Intel Slates 'Nehalem' for Q4 2008

Intel's corporate roadmap reveals additional details about its desktop iteration of 45nm quad-core Nehalem, dubbed Bloomfield. Nehalem will be fundamentally different from the Core architecture since the company plans to move the memory controller from the core logic on the motherboard to the processor die and Nehalem will also feature a new bus interconnect, currently dubbed Quick Path Interconnect. The former has been a cornerstone for the AMD K8 architecture since 2003 and the latter behaves very similar to HyperTransport, currently used on all AMD platforms since K8. A new bus and memory controller results in a new socket design, labelled LGA1366, meaning existing motherboards are not compatible with Nehalem-based processors.

The company will replace the X38 and yet to be announced X48 desktop chipsets with the Tylersburg chipset family and ICH10 southbridge for these first LGA1366 motherboards. Corporate guidance also suggests the company will likely ditch all DDR2 support in favor of DDR3, at least on the high end platforms. All Bloomfield processors will support three DDR3 channels. Bloomfield is expected to feature a new revision of Hyper-Threading: the processor will dynamically allocate additional threads – Bloomfield computers will detect eight logical cores. Unlike the 12MB L2 cache featured on high-end 45nm Penryn, slated for release between now and Q4 2008, the 8MB L2 cache on all Nehalem offerings can be shared between all four on-die cores. Intel's highest-end Bloomfield processors will feature a 130W thermal envelope.

News source: DailyTech

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It's just getting crazy. ****ing Moore's Law in effect for sure. All this processing power from AMD and Intel, yet companies like WD and Seagate can barely do a damn thing for hard drive performance.

Adding cores is not part of moore's law. Moore's law states the number of transistors per surface area will double, not the number of transistors per chip.

Well, they do what they can. They've got HDDs with 12-16MB of cache now, And ontop of that they've added NAND flash to these hybrid drives. Add to that the whole perpendicular stuff + SATA2, and 3 soon. Transfer speeds have went up. But it's hard to get higher than 150MB/s with the way HDDs are made/work.

That's why the future will be SSDs in a few years as your main drive for OS/Apps, and HDDs just for storing media etc.

Very exciting. AMD made a big mistake by changing sockets from 939 to AM2 so quickly. The fact AM2 is not backward compatible with 939 makes no sense to me. Same pin count, different grid pattern... When all we gain is multi-core ability, you'd think they'd increase the pins.

I'm glad Intel has decided to add more pins to the socket unlike AMD. This will allow faster growth for the CPU while keeping the MB standardized. 775 has been around so many years it's crazy.

How many months was AMD's socket 774 around...? Maybe 6 months max? AM2 will probably learn the same fate.

You're right, AM3 is already pretty much done. We should see it in a few months I bet. But I think AM3 is compatible with AM2, the only thing it adds is HT3? And not full HT3 iirc.

what's the pro in keeping the socket for so many years if each time you release a new processor you force customers to switch mobos because of chipset incompatibilities?
have a 775 mobo from last year? sorry, you cannot use the latest processor, they are forcing you to switch the chipset again... way to go Intel!
and don't get me started on the soon-to-be short lived X38...

gonchuki said,
what's the pro in keeping the socket for so many years if each time you release a new processor you force customers to switch mobos because of chipset incompatibilities?
have a 775 mobo from last year? sorry, you cannot use the latest processor, they are forcing you to switch the chipset again... way to go Intel!
and don't get me started on the soon-to-be short lived X38...

Socket 775 mobos support newer chips, they will probably just not support the faster FSB speeds dude to stability reasons. Many will go up to 1066mhz easy, 1333mhz is harder. In a few cases, all you need is a bios update and you get 1066mhz also.

I don't see them forcing you to change your mobo as much as AMD has, which was what the original poster talked about.

And the X38 might be "short lived" but only marketing wise. The newer X48 doesn't change anything aside from "officially supporting 1600mhz FSB". The X38 can do that also from what I remember. You're not forced to get the X48 if you want that speed and have a X38 already.

Not really, though QuickPatch looks alot like Hypertransport. It's roots are in the old Alpha EV7 designs. Intel owns all the old Alpha tech that they got from HP years ago. Hypertransport is a copy of the Alpha designs. So who is making a copy of who's tech is a moot point right now.