Intel wants to be inside Windows Phone

Intel isn't exactly the most popular chipmaker for smartphones, but they'd love to change that in the future. And Windows Phone could be just the platform to do that away, according to the president of Intel's Mobile Communications Group.

Before you get too excited (or disgusted, depending on how you feel about Intel), Eul says the time isn't quite right to enter the market. “We would be [interested] when we see that this market has a good chance to return our money that we have invested into this,” he explained to IDG, during an interview at Taiwan's Computex trade show.

Right now most of Intel powered smartphones are running Android, which Eul said was where the “money is,” while they're also 'engaged' with Tizen, a Linux-based OS that's also being backed by Samsung. But that hasn't stopped Intel from looking ahead, and they're ready to provide for Windows Phone devices if the market matures enough.

“Our roadmap has devices that can support [Windows Phone],” he explained. “The hooks for doing that [are] there.” But why would anyone want a smartphone powered by an energy hog like the Intel Atom? Eul says those concerns are put to rest pretty soon after someone actually tries out one of the devices.

In the meantime, Intel has several Atom chips aimed at the smartphone market on its roadmap, including next year's Merrifield, a high-performance chip made using a 22-nanometer process. Who knows, maybe we'll be seeing Windows Phones adorned with 'Intel Inside' stickers before too long.

Source: ComputerWorld

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16 Comments

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Not taking battery life into consideration, how's the performance of these Intel things compared to the ARMs?

Enron said,
Not taking battery life into consideration, how's the performance of these Intel things compared to the ARMs?

Mr. Eul says you'll love it

I'm confused .. what is stopping them from becoming yet another ARM CPU maker? If they do that then they can get into this market right away instead of shoehorning their Atom/x86 stuff.

Emon said,
I'm confused .. what is stopping them from becoming yet another ARM CPU maker? If they do that then they can get into this market right away instead of shoehorning their Atom/x86 stuff.

They used to make ARM CPUs and actually still hold an ARM license. They sold their ARM division (XScale) to Marvell some years ago. Used to be the most popular Windows Mobile processor until Qualcomm made their ****ty MSM7200

Emon said,
I'm confused .. what is stopping them from becoming yet another ARM CPU maker? If they do that then they can get into this market right away instead of shoehorning their Atom/x86 stuff.

ARM is not magical.

Intel is already really close to power consumption especially when factoring performance in the equation. And this is in just the known products shipping from Intel.

So if they can shove x86 technology into a SoC design that is faster and consumes less power than an ARM device, why not?

The whole SoC market has made some massive advances in high end processors in just the last few years. Ironically, it was Microsoft's work as being the 'first' to create a new base reference design technology that AMD, Intel, and others are all working from.

Microsoft hardware shocked the world with their work, and it raised a lot of eyebrows in the engineering community at the time, as Intel was more than embarrassed that Microsoft created these base working concepts before they could.
*(Bing/Google it, the articles are not common, as it was more engineering and very hardware level geek news, but it is out there.)

The current generation of the XBox 360 uses a SoC design, and was the first shipping product using this new technology. It is also why a new XBox 360 is quieter, uses less power, has less heat and is more reliable than the original XBox 360 with dedicated silicon for processors and chipsets.

AMD is also focusing on power consumption and performance with their APU and SOC technologies, and have stopped trying to race Intel on high end raw performance.

So don't be surprised to see a lot of new processing technologies in the next few years, especially with Microsoft pushing development to .NET and WinRT to break the x86 and x64 binary dependency.

webeagle12 said,
Title sound dirty

That occured to me while writing, but I hoped our readership would be mature enough to let it pass... expecting too much, apparently

THolman said,

I hoped our readership would be mature enough to let it pass... expecting too much, apparently

Yes. Yes you were.

deadonthefloor said,

I thought it was an homage to Intel's decade long slogan, which still made me giggle.

I knew someone would get it eventually.