Intel will deploy Windows 7 on employee's computers

According to The Register, Intel plans to deploy Windows 7 on its employee's computers. When asked at a Technology Summit with reporters and analysts in San Francisco whether the company would wait until service pack 1 to deploy Windows 7, Intel's EVP and chief sales and marketing officer Sean Maloney said, "This time I think we'll go faster."

This is good news for Microsoft since Intel and many other companies skipped Vista. The company's top salesman also sympathized with those who passed on Vista. "There was an excuse not to deploy Vista, because - rightly or wrongly - people said 'wait for service pack X' or 'we don't like the compatibility issues."

But this time, things may be different. Maloney said, "There are really good reasons for the business client in terms of security, power management - lots of good reasons why you'd go for it."

Maloney also referred to Windows XP Mode saying, "It looks really robust. You've got compatibility mode, which takes away a bunch of those arguments, so I think it's all positive." However, in order to run Windows 7's XP Mode, its CPU must support Hardware Virtualization, and unfortunately, many Intel multicore chips don't support this.

Regardless, Maloney wants companies to upgrade their PCs to run Windows 7. "Now the question is," he said, "can we get the argument to the CFOs and the CEOs that it makes more sense to spend a little bit on capital to reduce your operating costs?" He seems quite clear on the answer to that question, "We think it makes overwhelming sense if you have a three-year-old PC to replace the thing, for security violations, virus, power consumption, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera - and Windows 7 is just one big positive."

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for those companies that had compatibility issues with vista, wouldn't they still have the same incompatibilities in windows 7?

mocax said,
for those companies that had compatibility issues with vista, wouldn't they still have the same incompatibilities in windows 7?


More than likely as it is the same backend with tweaks and improvements... but they did include XP mode for a reason

You know, I'd have thought a company like Intel would have more than one employee... ;)

(Or maybe they're actually only installing it on one employee's PC :D)

I hope my company replace out workstations with Windows 7 and Dual...still running Single AMD 3200+ with 2GB RAM and 80GB EIDE hard drives

Well, this is definitely good for Intel. I look forward to seeing how quickly the majority of chips end up supporting hardware virtualization. I'm kind of surprised so few do already...

However, in order to run Windows 7's XP Mode, its CPU must support Hardware Virtualization, and unfortunately, many Intel multicore chips don't support this.

It's true that not all Core 2 Duo/Quad chips support VT-x, however I wouldn't say "many." A quick look through http://ark.intel.com/VTList.aspx shows that 83 out of the 106 different models/revisions support VT-x.

Saying that however, there are only a couple of Pentium Dual-Cores that support VT-x...

I have an E6700 which is listed at Intel's link you pasted to support VT-x. I ran Securable from grc.com and it shows Hardware Virtualization as "Locked On" instead of "Yes". Will it still work for XP Mode?

It might have something to do with the fact that the Windows 7 release is optimized for Intel cores. Thus, having plentiful machines in the corporate environment would make sense.

Hopefully this might set a precedent and move other companies forward and hopefully drive the 'oh no its vista all over again' culture out of peoples heads.

dbbondy said,
Hopefully this might set a precedent and move other companies forward and hopefully drive the 'oh no its vista all over again' culture out of peoples heads.

Hopefully it wont and people will start to think for themselves. Maybe they will figure out that being stuck to one company has its issues, even one as big as MS. Maybe people will start to try other OS that are just as good, and in some ways better.

But probably not, and everyone will move to 7 because they don't think.

Or those people who move to 7 like it and can think just fine? Just because people don't run to use whatever it is your using for whatever reason doesn't mean they don't think.

cakesy said,
Hopefully it wont and people will start to think for themselves. Maybe they will figure out that being stuck to one company has its issues, even one as big as MS. Maybe people will start to try other OS that are just as good, and in some ways better.

But probably not, and everyone will move to 7 because they don't think.


Yeah, same thing at my company. The braindead IT people force the super expensive Microsoft OS and Office suites down our throughts. I would kill to get a Mac here. And the crap RIM devices we have to use are just horrid. I have started using my iPhone for everything at work as it is so much better than anything RIM has.

macrosslover said,
wow a 3yo PC needs to be junked? it's not good enough to run windows 7? damn Intel is trying hard to push some numbers.

LMAO I thought that was interesting too...

macrosslover said,
wow a 3yo PC needs to be junked? it's not good enough to run windows 7? damn Intel is trying hard to push some numbers.

It is more to do with accounting. They amortize the cost of the PC over 3 years, and they have to get rid of it according to some financial rules. I imagine a lot of people at intel would need very fast machines.

cakesy said,
It is more to do with accounting. They amortize the cost of the PC over 3 years, and they have to get rid of it according to some financial rules. I imagine a lot of people at intel would need very fast machines.

i'm not talking about Intel particularly. his comment is directed at all companies and that's just insane to actually tell a company to replace a pc that's only 3yo.

That probably has more to do with needing/wanting to use XP Mode since it's specific to VT tech that most 3yo PC's don't have on their CPU's.

If you just wanna run win7 itself then 3 or 4yo hardware is just fine. I ran it ok on a 6+yo POS for the hell of it.

cakesy said,
It is more to do with accounting. They amortize the cost of the PC over 3 years, and they have to get rid of it according to some financial rules. I imagine a lot of people at intel would need very fast machines.


The company I work for also has a 3 year replacement policy. The old PCs/laptops end up getting decomissioned and thrown away. Like what cakesy said, it's more of an accounting/inventory policy that we follow based on Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) compliance (Enron's to blame for this).

Our company is actually moving to a new building in spring 2010 and our CTO wants to have Windows 7 deployed when we move. But we probably won't do it until Office 2010 is released. I'm just going to hate the support calls I have to deal with from our ignorant user base (1500 or so :P).

macrosslover said,
i'm not talking about Intel particularly. his comment is directed at all companies and that's just insane to actually tell a company to replace a pc that's only 3yo.



The reason that is has to do with cost-amortization rules (in short, tax laws) for desktop computers. For servers, the rule is five years, for HPCs, the rule is seven years; for mainframes, the rule is ten years (and used to be fifteen years). It has nothing to do with what the desires of Intel and Microsoft (or even IBM) and a lot to do with cost-recovery for businesses.

I know for a fact we replace our computers because of accounting and budgeting.
If each system isn't replaced every 3 years and the deadline is missed then that machine stays in service for 6 years.

3 years is a long time for a full time used machine.

macrosslover said,
i'm not talking about Intel particularly. his comment is directed at all companies and that's just insane to actually tell a company to replace a pc that's only 3yo.


It's actually pretty standard business practice, my last employer hold the UK MOD, DWP and many other major size projects. The situation is standard across all estates with systems normally leased on a 3yr period and then refreshed.

Not that older PC's cant' cope with 7 I ran it on a laptop that struggled with XP without probs. Naturally Intel as a MS agility partner, will help to push the sales and it makes sense for Intel to use the next thing in OS's internally as Vista was a flop 7 clearly isn't going to be.

macrosslover said,
wow a 3yo PC needs to be junked? it's not good enough to run windows 7? damn Intel is trying hard to push some numbers.

It depends on the PC. We have 3 year old dell optiplex gx 620's with only p4 processors with failing power supplies. So yes a 3 year old pc can be junked.

macrosslover said,
wow a 3yo PC needs to be junked? it's not good enough to run windows 7? damn Intel is trying hard to push some numbers.


The quote is attributed to Intel's "EVP and chief sales and marketing officer". Gee, I wonder why somebody in such a position would recommend companies replace their PCs every 3 years?