Intel's New Chipsets to Improve Core 2 Performance

Intel Corp., the world's leading supplier of core-logic sets which controls over the half of the market, plans to release new chipsets that will bring advanced functionality to end-users, but may scrap the support for legacy PS/2 and LPT ports, which will catalyze end-users to acquire new peripherals when migrating to new personal computers (PCs).

Intel's forthcoming chipsets code-named Bearlake X and Bearlake Q chipsets, according to a news-story published by IO Panel web-site citing sources close to Intel's Israeli center, will boost performance of Intel Core 2 processors by 15% compared to its speed on mainboards using current-generation core-logic sets. This seems to be logical, as the new core-logic sets will support 1066MHz memory and higher-speed processor system bus, which, along with performance of forthcoming Conroe chips, should definitely improve performance of PCs.

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News source: Xbit Labs

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I remember a couple ofyears back when ABit released a legacy-free board. Also, I recall servicing a Compaq (pre-HP/Compaq) unit that was legacy-free as well. Both obviously didn't take off as well as they had anticipated. Nevertheless, it's about time there's a move to legacy-free. I understand the necessity of COM & LPT ports for industial purposes (PLC's and the like), but really, the should shift away from those connection types; more so for enthusiast boards. Should there be a real immediate need for COM/LPT, there's always I/O cards they can install. Yes, PCI-based I/O cards still exist and it's not as though the BIOS can't be modified to accommodate a legacy add-on card? The less legacy I/O connectors on the back panel would allow for more features on the board. For example: instead of relying on pin-headers and such for the "additional IEE1394 and USB" they can just have them on the back I/O panel -- not all of them, of course, they can still have one USB pin header made available for the front panel I/O. Also, it'll allow for more eSATA connectors, provided line noise would not be a detrimental factor.

Just my 2 cents. /shrug

How many damned USB plugs do you need on the back of a case? If I'm not mistaken, wasn't USB supposed to be all about hubs? You'd have one under the monitor and plug your keyboard and mouse and flash drive in.

And honestly, a LOT of mainboard makers aren't using the back panel space as efficiently as possible. There will be a full load-out of plugs, except for a empty space where the second serial port, or the parallel port, or both, used to go... enough room to cram something in.

And many boards either leave a slot space with nothing in it, or a slot nobody actually uses (AMR/ACR/CNR/Whatever, or things like ASRock's "Future CPU slot" on Socket 939 boards) These can all be safely reappropriated.

I'd say if they prioritized the openings right, they'd do fine. For example, put the second Ethernet port, FireWire, and the sockets for anything > 2.1 sound on a mini-card. That frees up a LOT of space right there, and the connectors are of low importance for many users. (Honestly, those of you with dual Ethernet, do you use it?)

Hak Foo said,
How many damned USB plugs do you need on the back of a case? If I'm not mistaken, wasn't USB supposed to be all about hubs? You'd have one under the monitor and plug your keyboard and mouse and flash drive in.

And honestly, a LOT of mainboard makers aren't using the back panel space as efficiently as possible. There will be a full load-out of plugs, except for a empty space where the second serial port, or the parallel port, or both, used to go... enough room to cram something in.

And many boards either leave a slot space with nothing in it, or a slot nobody actually uses (AMR/ACR/CNR/Whatever, or things like ASRock's "Future CPU slot" on Socket 939 boards) These can all be safely reappropriated.

I'd say if they prioritized the openings right, they'd do fine. For example, put the second Ethernet port, FireWire, and the sockets for anything > 2.1 sound on a mini-card. That frees up a LOT of space right there, and the connectors are of low importance for many users. (Honestly, those of you with dual Ethernet, do you use it?)

The USB port suggestion was just that; a suggestion. Yep, I'll plug my keyboard and mouse (and whatever else) into my monitor. Hmmm.. wait, I would if I had a hub under it. Nor will I be replacing my 22" widescreen LCD for another monitor that has one. I like my VX2235wm, thanks. Moreover, USB hubs are better for low/bus-powered devices. As far as having dual ethernet? Yea, I use them both. But I care not to discuss my network topology with you.

Suggesting to move "the second Ethernet port, Firewire, and the sockets for anything > 2.1 sound on a mini-card" may not be a feasible option. That would be an extra expansion slot lost. It's bad enough GPU's are taking two slots already; and to say nothing of SLI/CrossFire 2-slot GPU configurations. I'm sorry, I would rather have those connectors where they are now and use whatever available slot I have for other devices. (I still prefer my Creative sound card over the onboard one, thanks... and of course my ATI TV tuner).

Nevertheless, the underlying fact that Intel's made a move away from legacy components is welcomed, imo.

I've never seen a PCI-x card and very few non-PS/2 mice and keyboards -these things outlast computers so there's no reason to throw them away!

Angel Blue01 said,
I've never seen a PCI-x card and very few non-PS/2 mice and keyboards -these things outlast computers so there's no reason to throw them away!

Well I can understand that.. Ever been to your friends house and they've got a new base unit but some grubby 5 year old ball mouse that's never been cleaned (And wonder why they suck at FPS's?)? As for keyboards, well time to say goodbye to those awful cream stained things with pubic hair and god-knows-what between the keys.

Time to buy a (decent logitech) wireless mouse, you won't regret it! Wireless keyboards are less important (for me anyway).

imachip said,

Well I can understand that.. Ever been to your friends house and they've got a new base unit but some grubby 5 year old ball mouse that's never been cleaned (And wonder why they suck at FPS's?)? As for keyboards, well time to say goodbye to those awful cream stained things with pubic hair and god-knows-what between the keys.

Time to buy a (decent logitech) wireless mouse, you won't regret it! Wireless keyboards are less important (for me anyway).


But I LOVE my cream (hehe... cream) stained KB. The pubic hairs serve as a good reminder not to be jerkin, when I should be fraggin! :-)

/I really have a Eluminx KB. It's PS2 though. :-(

Does anyone know when motherboards with these chipsets will come out? I wonder if they will be better for overclocking the C2D.

I agree with you there. PCI still has some use left in it, sure in the future move sound cards and other PCI addon cards to PCI-e but do what they did with AGP and PCI-e video cards.

lets add com ports too! i mean, kill them off as well. if someone would finally make good sata dvd drives you could kill off ide's as well. seems intel tried but it kinda backfired with the j-micro (i think) chip for ide support.

lothodon said,
lets add com ports too! i mean, kill them off as well. if someone would finally make good sata dvd drives you could kill off ide's as well. seems intel tried but it kinda backfired with the j-micro (i think) chip for ide support.

All new OEM systems come with SATA CD / DVD drives now... my new system that has a ICH8 southbridge on it doesnt even have a single IDE port on its motherboard...

Yeah, the key here is that finally the whole OEM channel is working together to drop old legacy connections. In the past it'd only be intel trying to do this. Now we can finally see USB pushed more, with Wireless USB coming soon, and since SATA is picking up steam, we can finally start to get rid of IDE.

Next they should drop any old PCI slots (the original 33mhz ones) and move everythng over to PCIe.

neufuse said,

All new OEM systems come with SATA CD / DVD drives now... my new system that has a ICH8 southbridge on it doesnt even have a single IDE port on its motherboard...

Same here.

My new PC has absolutely 0 legacy ports on it. Well it does have PCI, but I don't know if that quite counts as legacy quite yet.

But no IDE, no game ports, no LPT, no serial, no PS/2, none of that junk at all.

Oh only a boatload of business users and home users... But it's pretty much about time to retire it, yes. PS/2, not so much.

ahhell said,
Thank god they are finally killing PS/2 and LPT ports. Seriously, who uses an LPT printer???

Someones never worked in industry have they?... Almost every mechanical system it seems runs through parallel or Serial ports... very few are going through USB. why? because their factories where designed at that time and it costs a HUGE amount of money to get all new equipment just to switch to USB

neufuse said,

Someones never worked in industry have they?... Almost every mechanical system it seems runs through parallel or Serial ports... very few are going through USB. why? because their factories where designed at that time and it costs a HUGE amount of money to get all new equipment just to switch to USB

There will still be motherboards with parallel ports on them... they just won't be on *consumer* motherboards. It's a waste of space, money, and resources to put a port on there that the vast majority of people are never, ever, ever going to use. But for businesses, you'll be able to source a mobo with the required connections no problem.

actually i still use an LPT laser printer at work. :P

And my current pc doesnt have a parrelel port either, got around that one with a usb > lpt adaptor costing about £4 on ebay.

neufuse said,
Someones never worked in industry have they?... Almost every mechanical system it seems runs through parallel or Serial ports... very few are going through USB. why? because their factories where designed at that time and it costs a HUGE amount of money to get all new equipment just to switch to USB
I think the reason is rather RELIABILITY, which still remains too low with USB even almost 10 years after its introduction.

In my case and for now, I can admit LPT removed, I regret for COM, and I regret still more for PS/2 so far: when a PC is unable to start, there are too many cases where USB doesn't work, while PS/2 does.

Versailles, Fri 16 Feb 2007 19:00:00 +0100

neufuse said,

Someones never worked in industry have they?... Almost every mechanical system it seems runs through parallel or Serial ports... very few are going through USB. why? because their factories where designed at that time and it costs a HUGE amount of money to get all new equipment just to switch to USB

Because it costs so much they probably would not buy new computers either, right?

Yeah, I've stopped using PS/2 devices for a while, I did have a LPT Laser Printer but it died a few months back so no use for that port either. COM is probably another port that could go (if it hasn't already) the only thing I had that used that port was my Palm III cradle, but that died too several months ago. Everything is USB these days anyway.

Parallel ports are quite desirable because they're one of the last "Hackable" busses on a modern PC.

There are some fairly interesting projects which involve using the parallel interface for the PC to control external devices.

One of the most common is the small LCD status screen, popular for HTPC owners and enthusiasts. Just consider:

Surplus character LCD module + 18 inches ribbon cable + parallel connector + molex connector + handful of resistors and bits = $15-30 or so plus ONE EVENING of soldering.

Matrix Orbital or Crystalfontz all-ready-to-use USB LCD setup: $50-125 depending on exactly what you get.

I never liked USB. What annoyed me most was always that devices seemed to become associated with a given port. Maybe this is just how Windows understands it, but If I turn off my PC, move my USB scanner one port over, and turn it back on, it will go through the whole redetect-and-try-and-install-drivers thing. Considering that there's no real difference between the ports (unlike serial or parallel which DID live at different addresses, and software legitimately needed to know), it's weird.

Dude, if the machine you buy serves your needs, then why you get mad if something new comes out.
They'll never stop making new products, so you may never win this out.