Internet Explorer 9 Preview 7 released

IE9beta

Microsoft has just released their latest platform preview of Internet Explorer 9. The 7th release of the IE9 platform preview brings a number of performance improvements in Charka, Microsoft's JavaScript engine.

The initial platform preview was released just 8 months ago, and already is impressing the tech community. The latest platform preview beats out all of the competition in the WebKit SunSpider JavaScript benchmark tests, and is even faster than Google Chrome. The first IE9 beta was released three months ago.

Internet Explorer 9's preview platform is already leading the pack in HTML5 conformance tests, showing early signs Microsoft is doing something right with their latest browser. The IE9 team has increased its performance by 345% since the first platform preview. The video posted by Microsoft also shows off how well IE9 Platform Preview 7 can handle HTML5 compared to Firefox 4 beta 7 and Chrome 8 beta.

The new platform preview brings three three new benchmark tests, including Galactic, HTML5 Sudoku, and Shakespeare's Tag Cloud.

Microsoft also announced that since the launch of Internet Explorer 9 beta, it has seen over 13 million downloads. You can download IE9 Platform Preview 7 from testdrive.com.

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day2die said,

Optimizing for a benchmark is not cheating.

The problem from what I understand it is that it seems they've literally said "if the function looks exactly like this, run this code directly", instead of going through the Javascript interpreter, so as soon as someone makes a purely cosmetic change to the function it reverts to the normal speeds.

So since they're lying to us about their score, I'd say thats cheating. They did the same thing with Acid2, if you moved all of the code to another site IE fell apart.

Pc_Madness said,
They did the same thing with Acid2, if you moved all of the code to another site IE fell apart.

According to http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ie/arc...sn-t-ie8-passing-acid2.aspx IE8 fails the copies of ACID2 due to the cross domain security checks IE performs for ActiveX controls. It was some cross-domain restriction thing.

And actually "caching" pre-"compiled" versions of Javascript might be good... just look at how many websites are using Javascript libraries like jQuery, etc. I'm not even surprised if they decide to make the browser cache the "compiled" version of a script on a site. Think about it: if you visit gmail.com every day, the browser would not need to re-intepret the Javascript, as long as the original javascript code has not been changed. Of course, in that case the Javascript benchmarks wouldn't be accurate any longer. And then we'll need new benchmarks that are much more dynamic and force the browser to re-intepret the code every time...

Pc_Madness said,

The problem from what I understand it is that it seems they've literally said "if the function looks exactly like this, run this code directly", instead of going through the Javascript interpreter, so as soon as someone makes a purely cosmetic change to the function it reverts to the normal speeds.

So since they're lying to us about their score, I'd say thats cheating. They did the same thing with Acid2, if you moved all of the code to another site IE fell apart.


Microsoft already comment that it included dead code elimination which make it faster.

At best it's a bug in their dead code analysis routines, at worst they're cheating.

In IE9 there's a 10x speed difference with the changes, in Firefox 4 there's a 0.1ms change.

zeke009 said,
Instead of hacking the preview together with the beta, how about a new beta?

MS said there won't be a Beta 2, just RC candidate.. with the shortened release cycle it may be soon!

zeke009 said,
Instead of hacking the preview together with the beta, how about a new beta?
Why? The important part for testing is really the engine, not the UI.

Kirkburn said,
Why? The important part for testing is really the engine, not the UI.

not true, the IE9 beta was missing alot of functionality that we need like spellcheck and countless other things, we wanna play with new functions and see if they are working properly aswell as test for rendering issues and speed.

tuxplorer said,
Impressive but 60% of Windows users can't run it. Other browsers are available AND competitive. What's the point of IE9 besides pushing Windows 7 sales? e.g. Opera delivers impressive frame rate on XP.

Then use opera

Won't be long before Chrome, Firefox and Opera have versions that recommend or require Windows 7 - especially as HTML5 video takes off.

tuxplorer said,
Impressive but 60% of Windows users can't run it.

Well... more like 45%, and dropping significantly every month. But yes.

It is impressive. I think your question is more about upgrading Windows than IE. There are many reasons to upgrade. Rather than spend resources developing for a legacy OS, I think Microsoft is right to focus on offering the best experience on the latest OS generation. This is also ground work for Windows 8. For folks like yourself, 3rd party software makers continue offering new software releases to XP users..everyone is happy.

rfirth said,

Well... more like 45%, and dropping significantly every month. But yes.

Please continue to use yout 10 year old OS then.

blahism said,

Then use opera

Won't be long before Chrome, Firefox and Opera have versions that recommend or require Windows 7 - especially as HTML5 video takes off.

I doubt it. XP will be supported by other browsers till at least its end of extended support, that is, 2014.

tuxplorer said,

I doubt it. XP will be supported by other browsers till at least its end of extended support, that is, 2014.

Nah.. this holiday season and corporate updates through early next year will knock the number down big time.

While I'm enthusiastic about IE's progress..let's not get carried away...there is still work to be done on the UI side of things.

JohnCz said,
While I'm enthusiastic about IE's progress..let's not get carried away...there is still work to be done on the UI side of things.

which shouldn't take long since even wordpad's ui is actually more visually overwhelming than chrome's.

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