Internet Explorer 9 preview improves HTML5 compliancy

IE9HTML5

Microsoft is working hard on the next version of their browser, Internet Explorer 9, and plans to make this the browser the top dog on the block.  Early IE9 preview tests have been looking very promising for the browser, finally moving to be fully HTML5 and CSS3 compliant.

The Internet Explorer team posted an update on IE9' progress, showing that it's fully W3C Web Standards compliant so far.  Not only did the IE team post the results for IE9, but posted the test results for Mozilla Firefox 3.6.3, Opera 10.52, Apple Safari 4.05, and Google Chrome 4.1.  The tests were all performed with browsers running on Windows, shipped in May 2010.

The W3C Web Standards tests included HTML5, SVG 1.1 2nd edition, CSS3 media queries, CSS3 borders & backgrounds, CSS3 selectors, DOM level 3 core, DOM level 3 events and DOM level 2 style. Microsoft, with the help of W3C, performed a total of 192 tests on all the browsers.

Internet Explorer 9 scored 100% in all eight tests, while every other browser, except Firefox in DOM level 2 style tests, didn't score perfect in any of the test categories.  Internet Explorer 9 seems to be picking up its game, and will be a very tough competitor to all other browsers when it launches.

You can download the Internet Explorer 9 preview from here.

Thanks to Skwerl for the news tip!

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I just tested the preview on a website where I have a jQuery cycle slide show on the front page and the GPU rendering really does make a huge difference. With the latest release build of FF, Chrome, Safari, and Opera, the slide show spikes one core of my CPU between 70% and 95%. However, with the preview of IE9, the CPU core spike is only ~ 5%. Offloading the rendering to the GPU is a great step forward and I hope the other browsers do so as well.

If they make the browser support extensions, then I guess, Chrome+FF will get a big kick in the butt. Then its the other side that will have to improve.

Well, lets wait and see.

I personally use Chrome but am a long time user of Firefox. I havent used IE since Firefox was in its first betas. I use it at times though as IE is the best browser to be using to browse Microsoft products (no surprise). As an administrator for many company networks, IE also has much unrivalled Group Policy configuration, something every other browser lacks.

Northgrove said,
"Early IE9 preview tests have been looking very promising for the browser, finally moving to be fully HTML5 and CSS3 compliant."

No, it won't be. I can already say this, because the spec isn't finalized.

It won't even be very close to that.

This IE9 Preview also sucks in the HTML5 Test (html5test.com), getting 19 of 160 points. 19! The latest Chrome 6 dev build get 142. And there's a rundown of everything IE9 doesn't support. It's about useful technologies. Very useful technologies that both current builds of Chrome, Opera, and Firefox already support.

I have no idea what limited "test" Microsoft has demonstrated here.

It's very clear that competition is heating up, and biased reporting follows in its tracks.

I'm disappointed of you, Microsoft. Again.


I'm not so sure on those numbers. The numbers from html5test.com are the same in the Platform Preview as they are in IE8. I think they only test beta versions and up.

thealexweb said,
Why is Microsoft comparing their alpha builds against other browsers stable builds, why?

Because if they compared it to unreleased builds you'd whine that they're works in progress and not suitable for comparison. You can't have it both ways, troll! >

thealexweb said,
No Ogg Theora or WebM tho so back of the pack in that respect.

MS has said that they are more concerned with the h.264 however, they did say that they would roll out support for the others. But this probably be in the form of a plugin.

thealexweb said,
No Ogg Theora or WebM tho so back of the pack in that respect.

It'll use WebM if the codec is installed and, let's be honest almost no one is going to use Theora if WebM is available.

FWIW, I prefer "compliance" to "compliancy". The latter just sounds odd.

Example:
Q: How does this batch of compliance taste?
A: Better, but it's still a little compliancy.

Yuck.

Yay for fancy tables skewed in Microsoft's favor! They seem to be implementing and testing things no other browsers have, but when you look at the grand scheme of things, other browsers still support far more features as a whole.

Elliott said,
Yay for fancy tables skewed in Microsoft's favor! They seem to be implementing and testing things no other browsers have, but when you look at the grand scheme of things, other browsers still support far more features as a whole.

The reason MS is submitting these tests is because almost no web developers implement the full spec of HTML/CSS/SVG/etc. Another issue is that the HTML/CSS/SVG specs are designed independently of one another, meaning that some of those specs contradict one another.

Microsoft wrote the tests, Microsoft passes the tests.

Hooray for them, it has nothing to do with standards compliance.

>> "Microsoft wrote the tests, Microsoft passes the tests."

>> "W3C Web Standards"

Everybody knows that Microsoft own W3C... stupid little kid.

fenderMarky said,
>> "Microsoft wrote the tests, Microsoft passes the tests."

>> "W3C Web Standards"

Everybody knows that Microsoft own W3C... stupid little kid.

Yer what? Was that sarcasm?

I'm an IE fan and user, but frankly I find these statistics to be deliberately deceptive, even for statistics.

Very disappointing.

While Acid3 is not an end all and be all, it should definitely be on the list. It is excluded from the list because IE traditionally does so very poorly against it. My chrome browser in the dev channel gets 100/100 but utterly fails to create the correct rendering it - so really it would not have hurt to include it in the list.

As for the SVG. My router displays bandwidth reports with it, and they still do not render correctly, so I have serious reason to doubt those 100% flags. Either they are wrong, or they represent an even smaller subset of real-life functionality than Acid 3 does. Either way, they are misleading.

codename.venice said,
IE 9 scores 0% in few other tests!
http://www.freeciv.net/yet-another-html5-browser-test/ (got link from slashdot)
The tests MS listed were ones they submitted to the official WC3 test case suites themselves. Yes, of course they pass them. Kinda stupid to work on and submit tests you haven't passed.

Specifically choosing pre-existing tests that IE9 hasn't passed is an even worse idea.

Dalek said,
I'm sorry but who checks articles before they're posted?

Compliancy. Seriously?

Yes? Compliancy? What's wrong with that? It's in the dictionary...

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