Internet Explorer market share up again, Chrome slips

The browser market share figures are in for February 2013, and Internet Explorer has risen once again at the expense of Chrome, while Firefox, Safari and Opera also managed to gain users. Last month Internet Explorer managed to pass 55% global market share, according to Net Applications, and this month the most popular browser rose again to 55.82% (up 0.68% from 55.14%) to keep its commanding lead in check.

Chrome dropped to a new low, falling a huge 1.21% (from 17.48%) to occupy 16.27% of the market in February, making it the lowest share for Google's browser since September 2011. Firefox has increased its lead over Chrome as the second most used browser, breaking the 20% barrier again with 20.12% of the market, up from 19.94% the previous month. Safari was up 0.18% to 5.24%, while Opera rose 0.07% to keep 1.82% of the market.

Internet Explorer 8.0 is still the most used browser version worldwide with 23.38% market share, however Internet Explorer 9.0 (21.67%) is closing the gap having gained market share throughout February. IE6 is dropping users while still hovering around the 6% usage mark, while IE10 has been rapidly gaining users over the past few months and sits on a 1.57% share. With IE10 now available for Windows 7, expect this figure to rise significantly in March.

Source: Net Applications

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I use IE 10 most of the time, I also use Opera, FF, SRWare Iron and Avant Browser (IE10 Engine) Each of them remembers several predefine tabs for me (Except IE10).

Pardon my ignorance but what is the basis of such statistics? Statistics of Statcounter or W3counter is just the opposite of Net Applications. Now what makes the data of Net Application the perfect one while the others are plain bull S***? Ok, I know Neowin is a fan site, but still what is the reason of believing Net Applications and disbelieving the majority others?

As far as I know Statcounter uses hits, meaning the number of times pages are opened with browsers. Net Applications counts number of users for each browsers meaning active installations. Hence Net Applications is the more accurate assessment. Hope that solves your confusion... :-)

I use chrome. I like it because it is faster than Firefox, and it is cross platform so all my bookmarks sync to my windows, mac, Linux, android, and ios devices. It's also easy to install ad blockers and other useful extensions.

Stup0t said,
Could the market share increase be anything to do with IE10 for windows 7 going through windows update ?

I highly doubt it, considering market share usually implies in use, not installed in the computer world

Stup0t said,
Could the market share increase be anything to do with IE10 for windows 7 going through windows update ?

so far I haven't seen IE10 popped up in my machines running windows 7. so I'm sure that has nothing to do with windows update.
and even if it was included in windows update why would chrome browser share fall? wouldn't it just be updating existing IE installs, it wouldn't be adding new users right?

Stup0t said,
Could the market share increase be anything to do with IE10 for windows 7 going through windows update ?

IE10 is not on windows update thought, in a similar fashion will you attribute Chrome's market share to google.com?

I use FF on my computer, and Chrome on my phone. Chrome is just so much better for mobile that FF is but I just dont like using it on the PC. I use IE at work (we have apps/web apps that work better in IE) and I do use IE at home on occasion if I want to test how things load in IE.

techbeck said,
I use FF on my computer, and Chrome on my phone. Chrome is just so much better for mobile that FF is but I just dont like using it on the PC. I use IE at work (we have apps/web apps that work better in IE) and I do use IE at home on occasion if I want to test how things load in IE.

I use IE on my computers and dolphin on my phone. it's funny how everyone is all webkit webkit but web apps works better in IE or more to the point it's easier to code webapps for IE.

I have look into http://gs.statcounter.com and they show chrome is still growing but those gauys from http://www.netmarketshare.com/ show a different story.

There are many business that lock IE in their windows machine even when some government and security institutions have called to stop using IE. Those business keep using for two reason lazy staff whom donĀ“t bother to install and maintain more apps or because the need to keep compatibility with internal apps.

I just wonder who is telling the true.

Net Applications sample is smaller (0.1 the size of StatCounter's) and unrepresentative in many countries.

sryo said,
Net Applications sample is smaller (0.1 the size of StatCounter's) and unrepresentative in many countries.
But GS use hits, and not uniek people, if you press 10 times F5, you count as 10 diffrent users. Also NMS counts China harder than a country like Belgium, GS says theoretical that Belgium (11 miljoen people) has as many people asChina (miljards).

Statcounter reports very low for Microsoft compared to other tracking sites. I think it just comes down to the selection of sites that use Statcounter for their analytics.

The problem is that there is no single authorative source for this stuff. It's all guesswork.

I'm happy with IE10 on Windows 7/8 and I prefer to use it 99% of the time. I like the UI and feature wise, it's got everything I need. But I do have both Chrome and Firefox installed for times when some sites refuse to load correctly or have been deliberately crippled by developers stuck in IE6 thinking or when I need to create a separate session to the same site.

While IE10 is better than IE9 in some ways, I think I will stay with IE9 (by uninstalling IE10) until they iron out the bugs.

I'm also not a fan of the "Metroization" of the scrollbar, menu bar, drop down boxes, etc. It is not consistent with the Windows 7 visual style.

That is true, I don't know why they chose to leave those visual elements, it does look jarring against Windows 7's style. Most likely they didn't think it was worth the effort to retro-fix.

CtrlShift said,
I'm happy with IE10 on Windows 7/8 and I prefer to use it 99% of the time. I like the UI and feature wise, it's got everything I need. But I do have both Chrome and Firefox installed for times when some sites refuse to load correctly or have been deliberately crippled by developers stuck in IE6 thinking or when I need to create a separate session to the same site.

personally i prefer ie8 ui over ie9/10 but performance on the latest its a way better.

My main browser will still be firefox which its the best overall

These statistics are either very flawed or you're comparing numbers from two different companies. There is no way Safari gained 5% in one month.

Ambroos said,
These statistics are either very flawed or you're comparing numbers from two different companies. There is no way Safari gained 5% in one month.

Umm, where do you get that? Article says safari gained .18 %.

Internet Explorer 8.0 is by far the slowest browser I have used. I feel sorry for all the people who have been forced to use it. There are videos showing how weak it is in regards to security as well, when compared to other browsers. Many organizations think "it's from Microsoft, so it's okay". Yeah right. At least at my workplace, we favor against using IE - only few people use it.

IE10 still isn't customizable enough. I like being able to move around the bookmarks bar, and put it where I like.

68k said,
Internet Explorer 8.0 is by far the slowest browser I have used. I feel sorry for all the people who have been forced to use it.

I'm still forced to use it at work. It's a tragedy. I'm thinking about reporting the company to the authority for mentally abusing their workforce.

Right now, i am working in a site using Bootstrap (html5) and:
ie6 = looks ugly and some stuff fail. However, i don't care about ie6 customers.
ie7 = the same.
ie8 = some transparency fail, some animation fail but it is usable. At least it support png transparency (without any hack).
ie9 = no animation but everything else works.

.Neo said,

I'm still forced to use it at work. It's a tragedy. I'm thinking about reporting the company to the authority for mentally abusing their workforce.

Hell, I use IE 6 - 10 at my work. Just started a new job several months ago and they are so far behind in upgrading some things. Still have not gotten back to where they were when the economy tanked.

I use IE10 and Firefox only. IE10 on my phone and tablet for touch and Firefox on the desktop for add-ons. If IE had better add-ons and syncing I could easily dump Firefox and only use IE.

I used to use Safari for Windows, then I thought Id give IE10 a go when it came out. Stayed with IE10 for a few months until i eventually gave Chrome a go. Haven't looked back since.

IE10 hasn't hit windows update yet, you can only get it from microsoft's website. So we'll have to wait to see april's browser marketshare to see how that affects things.

IE10 seems pretty decent so i think a lot of people won't bother installing a different browser.

I'm a die hard firefox fan and likely always will be.

hardly anyone had the preview installed though, so until the rollout of IE10 happens it will have little marketshare as most people don't manually update browsers.

i use firefox but then i move to palemoon as primary browser for U.I. reasons.

i'm however looking gecko browser that using IE8 UI,
that would be most ideal for my browsing needs.

Torolol said,
i use firefox but then i move to palemoon as primary browser for U.I. reasons.

i'm however looking gecko browser that using IE8 UI,
that would be most ideal for my browsing needs.

There's Chrome frame for IE. WebKit tends to be one of the best engines from a developers point of view.

I could feel the heat from my machine after Google Chrome is running for 10 minutes. But my machine is warm only after using IE10 for 8 hours. So I end up using IE as primary browser now :-)

I also use Netscape Navigator v9.0.0.6, for the retro feel.

I adore I.E. to never use any other browser on a permanent basis.

Long live I.E.

I would like to know how many people are aware of other browsers but still favour IE. I'm not suggesting IE is bad but it's the default browser in Windows and majority of businesses lock workstations down to prevent installing other browsers. Most the time that's a wise choice to retain compatibility with internal applications. Home users just use IE as it's ready for use out of the box and what they are used to using whilst at work.

Personally I used Firefox but switched to Chrome some time ago. I use IE, and always will, at work for work related sites.

I am aware of every browser under the sun and have used pretty much all on a multitude of different machines. For my 64 bit Windows 8 installs I'm running IE10- it blazes! I've got Chrome, FF and Opera all installed though, each with their own purposes.

SK[ said,]I would like to know how many people are aware of other browsers but still favour IE.

I was using Chrome on all our machines until IE10 came out. Google has been a bit too...odd lately, I'm trying to avoid them wherever possible.

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
So what you are saying is that MS should now make FF or Chrome default as the ballot screen is not enough already?

No and personally that ballot screen is just the worst crap the EU has forced MS to do so far.
Most home users don't understand what's in their face. They will quickly read it and just select IE as that's what they know. Malware lives off this habit.

IE should be the default. I have no arguments. I was simply saying I would like to know how many users are out of choice. IE is default on Windows Server. If I even see a different browser installed on a server it makes me sigh. As I said I still use it for work related items. On a personal level I use Chrome.

Few I should imagine.

I know a lot of people that use IE and hardly any of them are unaware of Firefox or Chrome.

I use IE9 by choice. I started experimenting a few months ago and switched to Firefox for a few weeks but found that it got slower and slower as the day went on, particularly when I'm using Google Reader and used up shocking amounts of memory (sometimes over 1GB of RAM with only 1 or 2 tabs open) requiring me to shut it down and restart several times a day. Often if I'd not used it for half an hour it would take a minute or more to redraw the window when I brought it back to the front.
I switched to Chrome for a few weeks and found the same thing only less pronounced.
I'd read somewhere that Firefox had improved its memory handling so I switched back to Firefox for a couple of weeks and although it was better it still had the same problems.
This last week I've switched back to IE9, haven't closed the browser all week, despite having Google Reader permanently open in a tab, yet have had no performance drop-off. Think I'll stick to IE, it handles my workload so much better. I do actually prefer the interface as well, it fits in with the rest of windows (unlike that godawful orange button on firefox) and gets out of my way.

SK[ said,]I would like to know how many people are aware of other browsers but still favour IE. I'm not suggesting IE is bad but it's the default browser in Windows and majority of businesses lock workstations down to prevent installing other browsers. Most the time that's a wise choice to retain compatibility with internal applications. Home users just use IE as it's ready for use out of the box and what they are used to using whilst at work.

Personally I used Firefox but switched to Chrome some time ago. I use IE, and always will, at work for work related sites.


I have every other major browser. However, 64bit IE10 with EPM is the simplest and best method to browse web. It just works.

Many home users are 'aware' of other browsers and just plain don't care. The browser isn't a big deal to them, and arguments about the finer details of rendering engines are about as relevant to them as arguing about the differences between Foxit and Adobe readers.

It's all about The Bubble. People who do care participate in so many discussions about browsers that they don't realize this whole massive 'real world' of everyone else who has other things to care about still exists out there. The Bubble is present across all parts of the tech enthusiast community, and this ignorance of what 'everyone else' cares about is a big part of why the vocal minority has convinced themselves that their opinions are more valuable than is actually the case.

Joshie said,
Many home users are 'aware' of other browsers and just plain don't care.

I imagine most of them just go on the general advice of whatever techie they know.

Joshie said,
Many home users are 'aware' of other browsers and just plain don't care. The browser isn't a big deal to them, and arguments about the finer details of rendering engines are about as relevant to them as arguing about the differences between Foxit and Adobe readers.

It's all about The Bubble. People who do care participate in so many discussions about browsers that they don't realize this whole massive 'real world' of everyone else who has other things to care about still exists out there. The Bubble is present across all parts of the tech enthusiast community, and this ignorance of what 'everyone else' cares about is a big part of why the vocal minority has convinced themselves that their opinions are more valuable than is actually the case.


True.

People care about if they can read their emails, browse facebook, google/bing when needed and watch youtube. Most people don't give a **** which browser they are using for these. As long as it works, they are ok.

Joshie said,
Many home users are 'aware' of other browsers and just plain don't care. The browser isn't a big deal to them, and arguments about the finer details of rendering engines are about as relevant to them as arguing about the differences between Foxit and Adobe readers.

It's all about The Bubble. People who do care participate in so many discussions about browsers that they don't realize this whole massive 'real world' of everyone else who has other things to care about still exists out there. The Bubble is present across all parts of the tech enthusiast community, and this ignorance of what 'everyone else' cares about is a big part of why the vocal minority has convinced themselves that their opinions are more valuable than is actually the case.

Best explanation on this site so far!

Sorry I do not agree with the EU here. It is NOT Microsoft's responsibility to advertise anyone else's Browser. Is people are unaware of Firefox or Chrome, so be it. They need to step up their game.

Crimson Rain said,

I have every other major browser. However, 64bit IE10 with EPM is the simplest and best method to browse web. It just works.

Because IE has such a high user share, websites pretty much have to support it.
The problem is that, when designing a website, it's always IE that causes a load of problems where other browsers just seem to all work as expected.

IE is getting better with each version, but it is still the case that the great experience you get, comes not from how good IE is, but from the large amount of extra work that the website developers have put in, ensuring their site works with IE.

I one that uses IE (IE10 on Win 8 x64 Pro actually) after having tried Chrome and FF (and variants such as WaterFox and PaleMoon). There are a number of reasons, but I will say the experience in most browsers to me was virtually the same. You click a link, it opens. So the reasons I choose IE are not like "OMG FOR REAL??" - I like EPM, x64 with High Entropy ASLR (randomizes memory more so it's harder to break into with an exploit) and the AppContainer Sandbox of EPM is the best around I hear. All my sites work fine in all the browsers, as I mostly visit simple news, forum and video sites. But IE10 does seem the fastest, to launch from desktop and close a tab (I especially like this), etc. it's super close between all of them performance wise, but I love that fast tab close feature of IE. Another one that is kinda big to me, though, is IE10 is the only browser that works with taskbar auto-hide on my system, FF and Chrome will most times block the taskbar from un-hiding, and I hate that. And a +1 to the guy who mentioned the interface, I do find it to be a little more visually compatible with the system than FF or Chrome. I enable Active-X filtering, and TPLs, so I get most of the add-on features I use in FF and Chrome as well.

SK[ said,]I would like to know how many people are aware of other browsers but still favour IE. I'm not suggesting IE is bad but it's the default browser in Windows and majority of businesses lock workstations down to prevent installing other browsers. Most the time that's a wise choice to retain compatibility with internal applications. Home users just use IE as it's ready for use out of the box and what they are used to using whilst at work.

Personally I used Firefox but switched to Chrome some time ago. I use IE, and always will, at work for work related sites.

Plenty of PCs and laptops come with Chrome setup as the default browser.

ingramator said,
I am aware of every browser under the sun and have used pretty much all on a multitude of different machines. For my 64 bit Windows 8 installs I'm running IE10- it blazes! I've got Chrome, FF and Opera all installed though, each with their own purposes.

But the same fact that you read this site makes you different than the majority of people using a computer who have no idea of what we are talking about.

SK[ said,]

No and personally that ballot screen is just the worst crap the EU has forced MS to do so far.

Whilst I understand why the ballot screen is in place, I hate the guts of it. It ONLY seems to be satisfied if you pick any browser but Internet Explorer.

And quite frankly, I like IE10 so much that I feel it very much missing in my Gentoo installation on my laptop. I dislike Chrome (and Webkit) and especially how sterile and static it renders pages, I used to like Opera but it's a bit too slow on the said laptop. So that leaves me only with Firefox and the Gnome 3 Browser - Epiphany, yes it's Webkit but its at least lightweight but crashes all the time.

MadnessRed said,

Because IE has such a high user share, websites pretty much have to support it.
The problem is that, when designing a website, it's always IE that causes a load of problems where other browsers just seem to all work as expected.

IE is getting better with each version, but it is still the case that the great experience you get, comes not from how good IE is, but from the large amount of extra work that the website developers have put in, ensuring their site works with IE.


Always this stuff, total BS if you ask me. I've been developing webpages for years. And yes there where issues with IE6 and plenty of them, but with IE6 at the time being 90% market share... it basically sets the standard. IE7 was a good increase. so was IE8. and there where just few limitations from IE7/8 that required little quirks and 'ie-hacks'. But in contrary to these IE hacks everyone cries about, the same people use the 'webkit-' or 'Mozilla-' specific junk constantly. Which is even further away from 'standards' then the IE implementations.
And since IE9 creating webpages is a blast, I design them primarily for IE10 now and they 'mysteriously' work across all browsers.
I've tested this with a few pages I made for Chrome only, I found that simple stuff didn't work or performed differently on Fx, IE or even Opera from Chrome. And similar with pages developed for Fx. While developing for Opera worked well for all other browsers.

Crimson Rain said,

True.

People care about if they can read their emails, browse facebook, google/bing when needed and watch youtube. Most people don't give a **** which browser they are using for these. As long as it works, they are ok.

Yeah, whenever you see someone throwing an epic fit about fonts and smoothing and how some particular visual element is slightly off in one browser vs. another, you're seeing someone who is completely and utterly disconnected from the priorities of the people actually visiting those sites.

It's cute, in a way, to see people so outraged because of the challenge to make something match exactly the set of visual specifications they're coding against, but like any act of design/creation, the people doing the work are NOT seeing the same thing as the audience when looking at the result.

It's a little like music. The musician hears his performance and cringes at every miniscule mistake. A listener comes up to him later and congratulates him on a perfect performance.

Same here. Its good to have choice. But I don't stick to one browser for a long period of time. Gives me more freedom to try different browsers.

ingramator said,
I am aware of every browser under the sun and have used pretty much all on a multitude of different machines. For my 64 bit Windows 8 installs I'm running IE10- it blazes! I've got Chrome, FF and Opera all installed though, each with their own purposes.

One of the other main reasons business use IE, is group policy. Until another browser provides the same sort of central control as GPO provides in IE, i doubt many large IT shops would want to change.