Internet Explorer on Xbox One detailed; IE team is also giving two consoles away

While it took Microsoft seven years to add Internet Explorer to its Xbox 360 console, the upcoming Xbox One will have a version of the company's web browser ready to go for the launch on November 22nd. Today, the official IE blog has more information on IE for Xbox One.

The blog states:

We increased support for modern web standards by over 200% from Xbox 360 to Xbox One. We’ve added browser features that you know and love from your Windows PC – website pinning, multiple tabs, inPrivate browsing, SmartScreen, Cookie blocking, and Do Not Track, and we’ve increased integration with Xbox SmartGlass so you can use your smartphone or tablet to not only navigate Internet Explorer on Xbox One, but be able to move websites back and forth from your television to your phone or tablet.

The Kinect add-on can be used with IE so people can view, for example, the New York Times website simply by saying, “Browse to New York Times". You can also say "Click on" and then the name of any link on a web page to have IE surf to that page. Microsoft says IE can head to the page just by hearing a few of the words in the link.

The Kinect gesture capture features can also be used with IE. Microsoft says:

Just reach out, and grab the page. Then move your hand up or down to pan around the page. You can also pull the page toward you to zoom in or push it away to zoom out. Move your open hand over a link and press it to click on it. And if the links are too close together on a page, the page will automatically zoom in so you can more easily choose one to press.

The blog offers up some tips for website developers so they can give their users the best experience when the site is viewed and accessed on the Xbox One version of IE.

Finally, the IE team is giving away a Xbox One console to two lucky residents in the U.S. The blog states that the people who are eligible to enter can use the Twitter @IE handle and the hashtag #IEonXboxOne, along with a message "telling us about what you’re excited to experience in Internet Explorer for Xbox One." The two winners will be picked at random on November 21st.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Microsoft uses Facebook and Twitter to congratulate Sony on PS4 launch

Next Story

Microsoft releases free 3D printing app for Windows 8.1

32 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

I don't how much Sony spent on the web to lobby against XBOX one but I am pretty sure despite all fuss in the internet, people will buy the XBOX ones like hot cakes, including myself.

> Finally, the IE team is giving away a Xbox One console to two lucky residents in the U.S

That probably would've worked out better if they both got their own.

Spying I assume, legitimate concern. All companies are complicit. You can live in the woods like a hermit or take steps to guard what's yours. Now that there's awareness, the new industry, PRIVACY, will emerge. Most of us here have been aware and already use aliases, VPNs, disinformation etc. Things will get worse before they get better, but it'll happen. In the meantime, how cool will it be to command your browser this way? Just hope it's not another let down when actually in use. Love the idea though.

acido00 said,
I heard we could be able to install Chrome on XBOX One, is that true?

considering how poorly Chrome performs on touchscreens on Windows, you certainly don't want to run that piece of crap on Xbox one with kinect.

and no, you can't run chrome on XB1. It's a win32 app.

In theory yes, once the App Store goes live, I'm sure there will be different kinds of apps on it and maybe even browsers, if MS lets them though.

Thief000 said,
In theory yes, once the App Store goes live, I'm sure there will be different kinds of apps on it and maybe even browsers, if MS lets them though.

good point! yeah probably the app store will improve experience on XBOX.

IE's not typically my thing.... but on a TV, with Kinect and the other goodies.. that looks really nice. I keep telling myself I wasn't planning on getting a console and stay a card carrying member of the master race, but it's getting really hard lately.

TV experience is a bit different than desktop experience. I think you can keep your membership to the master race if you game on PC from time to time.

It has SmartScreen? Thats interesting as thats to help stop malware and stuff. It would be strange if consoles start getting malware/spyware, but entirely possible.

NoClipMode said,
It has SmartScreen? Thats interesting as thats to help stop malware and stuff. It would be strange if consoles start getting malware/spyware, but entirely possible.

SmartScreen is used to block scam and phishing sites.

it is not designed to block malwares that exploit browser flaws. And yes, it is entirely possible that hackers try to exploit flaws in consoles browsers.

However the console environments are sandboxed and run only signed code, so there is less risk of successful malware attack.

If there wasn't all of these cool features coming out of the box, I would have waited for Titanfall. But... can't... resist... so one week to go.

Well its sounds like a full featured browser, so hopefully that means we can access any media services that don't offer native apps yet.

As long as the performance is there, I look forward to using it.

I wonder about that. They haven't said yes or no, but considering that flash is now integrated into IE, I would not be surprised if it is supported.

Could be, but I think they'll keep the security on IE on the Xbox One as shut as possible, just like on the Xbox 360. Flash is still the security hole it was before, even after every patch, another leak turns up. So integration doesn't necessarily mean better.

That's true, but remember that they support flash on IE for Windows RT devices, so maybe they have a better handle on isolating possible issues.

Thief000 said,
.... Flash is still the security hole it was before, even after every patch, another leak turns up. ....

Probably why MS integrated and manage it in Win8 (IE10) forward. If they can put it on RT, move from whitelisting to blacklisting, they can certainly have it on the console.

Being that this is an NT based console, It wouldn't surpise me if flash would be present. Afterall managing different browser forks is more work than a consistent code deployment across the ecosystem.

Thief000 said,
Could be, but I think they'll keep the security on IE on the Xbox One as shut as possible, just like on the Xbox 360. Flash is still the security hole it was before, even after every patch, another leak turns up. So integration doesn't necessarily mean better.

Flash has actually a lot less flaws than webkit for example.
Once properly sandboxed, it doesn't cause a significant security risk. It would be a good thing if it was included, but I don't think it will.

the XB1 security will rely on code signing and sandboxing. Not on eliminating every security flaw in the browser, which is impossible.

if a hacker manage to run malicious code, the XB1 OS should prevent it to persist after restart (the console will not run unsigned components).

deadonthefloor said,
....

Reading the blog post helps:
In the section of the blog post for web developers, they offer this prescriptive advice.
Avoid using plug-ins
Use HTML5 audio and video (h.264/AAC/MP3)

this leads me to believe no flash support.

Thief000 said,
"Once properly sandboxed". That's the thing and they decided against it even on the Xbox 360 where it would have been.

the xbox 360 was based on powerpc architecture.
even if Microsoft wanted to, it wouldn't have been able to support flash on IE/360, because adobe wouldn't want to spend money on supporting powerpc architecture just for a console browser (especially since very few people browse the web on their tv).

on the xbox one, there is no technical issue preventing Flash to be ported. That would not require a major rewrite of Flash player from adobe.

but I don't think it's microsoft's interest to include Flash on XB1. Flash player support will not motive media companies to develop XB1 apps for their tv/media services.

apple banned flash on ios for that reason. They wanted iOS specific apps to be created. They didn't want content provider to rely on the web browser to serve platform independent content.

There is Flash for PowerPC architecture. It is for Mac, but a conversion wouldn't have been hard to implement.
Apple banned Flash from their devices for security reasons as well as the reasons you mention for its developers as they want them to make specific applications for their platforms and Flash undermines that, just like it does for MS.

Thief000 said,
There is Flash for PowerPC architecture. It is for Mac, but a conversion wouldn't have been hard to implement.

support for powerpc macs has been dropped since long ago.
there is no recent Flash player build for ppc.
so, it would have required a significant amount of work and money to resume development on ppc, only for a small user base.


Apple banned Flash from their devices for security reasons as well as the reasons you mention for its developers as they want them to make specific applications for their platforms and Flash undermines that, just like it does for MS.

most of Jobs' arguments against Flash were just bull****.
if security was a concern, then apple should have removed Safari from the iPad, because webkit has a much worse security record than Flash Player.

but as I said earlier, security of webkit, trident, or flash doesn't matter that much. We know there ARE going to be security flaws. That's why everything gets sandboxed. And only signed code is allowed to run after restart.

that significantly reduce the risks compared to desktop OSes which can't ban unsigned code and can't block a lot of potentially unsecure features because they must continue to let legacy apps run.

in other words. flash player on iOS would not have decreased security in a significant way, contrary to what Jobs said.

and the battery life argument was bull**** too. Flash player performs very well on Windows RT, and battery life is pretty good.
when rendering similar content, animations/video in Flash player used to be much more CPU efficient than in HTML5.
there have been a lot of benchmarks about this. The only real issue with flash is that Flash content creators often used video, shader effects, and lot of features without caring about the CPU usage. The same could happen with html5 once visual editors become mainstream (designers with no clue about CPU constraints will use CPU expensive rendering).

I'm actually glad they have all these features and services integrated OOTB. It circumvents the necessity for third party apps and makes everything more streamlined.

This sounds incredible to be able to reach out and grab a web page to pan and zoom and then even click a link? Holy crap. To be able to navigate to a site on your TV or click a link by voice is a huge step forward.