Internet Explorer passes 55% market share in January

Net Applications is reporting that Internet Explorer has crossed the 55% market share threshold in January for the first time since August 2011, continuing the rises the browser saw in the second half of 2012. Internet Explorer was up 0.37% to 55.14% for the month, but it wasn't the only browser that saw a gain in market share according to Net Applications' data.

Firefox also rose, up 0.18% in January to 19.94% (from 19.82%), as did Opera which gained 0.04% to post a 12 month high of 1.75%; Safari was completely flat, losing no market share. Of course if most browsers posted a gain in market share, it has to come at the expense of one of them, and for January it was Chrome that took the hit: Google's browser fell a whopping 0.56% (from 18.04% to 17.48%), pushing it further away from Firefox to stay in third spot.

Internet Explorer 8 still commands the title of the world's most popular browser, with its market share of 23.54% coming in higher than all versions of Firefox combined. Internet Explorer 10 finally reached a market share above 1% having risen 0.33% to 1.29% in January, while Internet Explorer 9 market share dropped just like Windows 7. The latest versions of Chrome (24) and Firefox (18) are the most used versions of their browser types, with 8.70% and 8.28% usage respectively.

Net Applications gathers data based on 160 million unique visitors to around 40,000 websites, and data is weighted by country to give the most accurate results possible.

Source: Net Applications

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33 Comments

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I don't even see why they bother with these charts. Someone out there must not be aware that well over 50% of the browsers in use are NOT by choice. A great number of companies (including the one I am employed at) remove the ability to install another browser. Else, key corporate, internal sites reject anything but a certain browser.

Yay to IE and Opera!!

Maybe people are getting smarter and NOT simply being puppets and following others just because they say something like Chrome is cool!!

This is wonderful news, IE 10 is much better than Chrome on tablets (I mean scrolling, multi touch, and zoom), Chrome is way better in API and HTML 5 and tons of internal technologies, but they started neglecting the User Interface, I hope this pushes Google to make Chrome better than IE, and pushes Microsoft to make IE better than Chrome, we are the winner after all

Can't understand, everyone around me using Chrome or Firefox. How magically IE can gain marketshare.

I'm using IE 10 now but honestly i'm not satisfied with it, sometimes i have to open Chrome.

sontung57 said,
Can't understand, everyone around me using Chrome or Firefox. How magically IE can gain marketshare.

I'm using IE 10 now but honestly i'm not satisfied with it, sometimes i have to open Chrome.

Probably because IE comes with every PC.

techbeck said,

Probably because IE comes with every PC.

^that is it!! If Windows had true browser selection, where you had to pick one at first login, I suspect IE would be down with Safari for usage.

sontung57 said,
Can't understand, everyone around me using Chrome or Firefox. How magically IE can gain marketshare.

I'm using IE 10 now but honestly i'm not satisfied with it, sometimes i have to open Chrome.


Everyone around you isn't the entire world:P
Just out of curiosity, what is Chrome or Firefox better at that IE lacks?

Gary7 said,
This is due solely to the release of Windows 8

Either way those Win8 users realised that IE10 is really great and kept it

I disagree. IE 7 was too little too late, but starting with IE 8, it because a decent browser, IE 9 was better, it was version 9 where people started saying "wait, maybe I don't need Chrome anymore."

I wonder who use IE still ??

Personally really dont know any person who is an Internet user and using Internet Explorer !!!!

I wonder how can this IE still lead in market share ??

Choto Cheeta said,
I wonder who use IE still ??

Personally really dont know any person who is an Internet user and using Internet Explorer !!!!

I wonder how can this IE still lead in market share ??

That is really ignorant. Most businesses are on IE anyway

Riva said,

That is really ignorant. Most businesses are on IE anyway

They mainly handle their own specific website or intranet traffic only rather accessing "WWW" from which the net application data claims to be.

Choto, You must know very few people.

No clue what you are trying to say in the other reply. Businesses tend to use IE because it is highly manageable. Most management agents have built-in support for applying patches and AD group policies allow administrators to fully control IE without a lot of work. Sure, the same can be done on other browsers, but it takes more custom work.

I personally have gone back to using IE full time on my home and work PC. I don't see any need to really use Chrome. I stop using Firefox because it was such a performance nightmare.

If it wasn't for the fact I use multiple different OS's and need to sync between them, I'd probably be using IE 10 now. I'm pretty impressed with it.

I hope I'm missing something, because the w3schools website should not be considered even remotely accurate for worldwide usage. There are enough warnings on that page to explain this and discourage anyone from using it for the purpose you appear to have been attempting to do so.

That'd be like comparing the operating system statistics for MSDN or Windows Update and claiming that Windows commands virtually 100% of the market.

In other words, w3schools is heavily biased due to the nature of the content it provides. It even says that on that very page:

"W3Schools is a website for people with an interest for web technologies. These people are more interested in using alternative browsers than the average user. The average user tends to use the browser that comes preinstalled with their computer, and do not seek out other browser alternatives."

TheCyberKnight said,
These minute variations are totally irrelevant.

A constant rise for half a year is now a minute variation?

Anyway, the most important thing is that IE9/10 keep growing and IE8 falls so the web can move on.

I agree, posting a 0.37% gain is totally pointless and also misleading. Anyone who understands statistics would look for the margin of error. Changes this small probably fall inside it.

Now figuring out the margin of error isn't a simply high-school sample size calculation. These reports are based on a 100% sample size, however, the mechanism to identify unique users and ensure someone isn't counted multiple times is imperfect; therefor a margin of error does exist, even if it is unknown. Even a 1% MoE (which is statistically extremely low) totally wipes any relevance away.

The results of NetMarketShare are based on a full month, and there fit 44640 minuts in. But do you say this because Chrome is losing?

No, I have no agenda behind my comment, I am an IE user myself if you care. I am only pointing out that statistics are not perfect, and when you are talking about changes this small it is a bit silly. It would be a little like putting a picture of an insect on your computer screen and then getting a microscope out trying to see tiny details. All you will see are the pixels because the image is not perfect.

Studio384 said,
The results of NetMarketShare are based on a full month, and there fit 44640 minuts in.

TheCyberKnight was not talking about minutes of an hour. He was saying minute which is pronounced "my-noot" but spelled the same. It means an extremely small value.

sphbecker said,
I agree, posting a 0.37% gain is totally pointless and also misleading. Anyone who understands statistics would look for the margin of error. Changes this small probably fall inside it.

With a sample size of 160 million, a rise of 0.37% = 592,000 more users. Assuming there's roughly 2 billion internet users, this means roughly 7.2 million more users. I'd say that's significant.

Scorpus said,

With a sample size of 160 million, a rise of 0.37% = 592,000 more users. Assuming there's roughly 2 billion internet users, this means roughly 7.2 million more users. I'd say that's significant.

Ahhhh, people who don't understand statistics are hard to talk to. Okay, I am not saying the number is insignificant. I am saying the data resolution isn't accurate enough to measure such a change. How many people use more than one computer? How many people use more than one browser on the same computer? Within the month of the study, how many people cleared their cookies or reinstalled their OS? How many people don't allow tracking cookies at all? Every one of those events and probably at least a dozen more would cause a single person to be counted more than one time.

With anomalies like that in the sample data you can't expect to be able to accurately measure a change as small 0.37%. I am not saying the data should be ignored, I am just saying, wait until the change is statistically significant before claiming victory. If market share is in fact going up by about 0.37% every month, then by the end of the year we should see a 3.5-5.0% increase, which is significant. If the numbers just wiggle then it is just noise in the data that should be ignored.