iPad buyer in Wal-Mart receives a box of notepads

An interesting story to tell, and more than enough paper to tell it...

Wal-Mart has a reputation for being somewhere you go to buy things for great prices, and while it's true that you can get a great bargain that isn't a guarantee. Especially not when you've spent iPad-money on a box of notepads, as happened to a family in Sealy, Texas.

Somehow, the sealed iPad box came stuffed with notepads; the mystery of how someone stuffed it with notepads without opening the seals is still one that needs solved, but the result was one very disappointed fifteen year old. Understandably outraged, the family returned to the store to demand a return.

No return was forthcoming, even after two hours of back and forth discussion with the store's manager, who explained the issue could not be resolved. No doubt it has left a bitter taste in the mouths of everyone concerned, and there's no way to tell if there are any more iNotepads out in the wild.

Wal-Mart released a statement on the topic, with the most important element below:

It appears someone previously purchased the iPad, removed the contents and resealed it in a manner that clearly resembles factory packaging. We have reviewed our surveillance video to see if we can find out who is responsible for this and we are sharing that information with local law enforcement in hopes that whoever is behind this is held responsible for their selfish acts.

The announcement also explains that the family has been contacted to receive a full refund, and they've also got some revolutionary new notepads as well.

Source: Khou | Notepad image via Shutterstock

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13 Comments

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man, isn't this a sad age? One EMP hit and all this techno stuff will just become expensive paperweights. we should always rely on the failsafe paper and pen backup.

Two things.

1. Normally, whenever I return electronics to Walmart, they have someone from that department come up to Customer Service to make sure I am returning what the box says I am, including cords, manuals, etc. Or they send me back there to do it. It seems like Walmart was lax in this case, given the fact someone was able to return an iPad box with notepads inside.

2. It is always a good idea to check your electronic purchases BEFORE leaving the store. That way, you are less likely to have doubts raised by Customer Service if there's an issue.

PS. Of course, if this was an inside job, my first point is moot.

Edited by COKid, Oct 13 2012, 6:34pm :

needs solved

Grammatically incorrect.

Should either be 'needs solving' or 'needs to be solved'. This '___s ____ed' seems to be a relic from certain areas where they improperly teach grammar, and it infuriates me.

I knew someone that did this years ago. They did it with Nintendo 64 games and swapped out the games for an old cassette tape. His boldest move was buying a high end flight joystick and replacing it with a can of paint thinner. Glad he got caught.

I also was the victim of this with my 360. The thief took out the bundled game and controller and swapped the console with a junk one. While a previous poster is correct about the serial number, it is extremely easy to swap that.

Troll said,
I knew someone that did this years ago. They did it with Nintendo 64 games and swapped out the games for an old cassette tape. His boldest move was buying a high end flight joystick and replacing it with a can of paint thinner. Glad he got caught.

I also was the victim of this with my 360. The thief took out the bundled game and controller and swapped the console with a junk one. While a previous poster is correct about the serial number, it is extremely easy to swap that.

Meant to add they swapped the guts with another 360. And they superglued the box together after using a heat gun to open it without breaking any seals. This was at target and I luckily was able to go back within 10 minutes and get it swapped out. I also forced them to open the new box in front of me to ensure all parts were there, which they were.

And finally, the kid in question that did this worked at a store with access to a shrink wrap machine so there was no second guessing until Toys R Us had numerous complaints and caught him with the cassette tape.

get the family a replacement and investigate walmart employees, do mot punish the paying customer. if they had the receipt it should be easily resovled.

This scam has been around so long that it's surprising that there haven't been counter measures put in place by retailers, or at least more of these types of complaints.

10-14 years ago it was very difficult to tell different models of Maxtor hard drives apart. It was a common scam to buy say a new 30GB HDD, put an older 8GB in the new box, and take it back and exchange it for another new 30GB. Then, one would take another older HDD and the new box to another store location and repeat.

Same thing happened to me with a Xbox 360. I got it home, opened it up, and tried to plug the power cord in the back and it didn't fit. To my surprise it was someone's bricked Xbox 360. They would not take it back and even blamed me for swapping Xbox's!

sprfly said,
Same thing happened to me with a Xbox 360. I got it home, opened it up, and tried to plug the power cord in the back and it didn't fit. To my surprise it was someone's bricked Xbox 360. They would not take it back and even blamed me for swapping Xbox's!

360s have a little window in the side of the box, and the serial number on the console will show through that window. Of the 3 360s I bought, they always scanned that serial number, which was printed on the receipt. One of the 3 that I bought was a gift for my brother, he wanted to return it (an Arcade) and get the higher end model. I gave him the wrong receipt, and they wouldn't take it back because they thought he was trying to return a broken one. I gave him the correct receipt, and he exchanged it with no problem.

Wasn't this in the news like 6 months ago? Didn't they determine the employees were stealing the ipads and resealing. It's ridiculously easy to do if you have access to the equipment.

Read the source and this is a different case.