IPv4 addresses down to 5% availability

 

Credit: American Registry for Internet Numbers

On Monday, the Number Resource Organization announced that adopting IPv6 addresses was now more important than ever.

The news came as it was announced that IPv4 addresses are down to the last 5% of availability. The NRO, who controls the fair distribution of unallocated Internet resources (IPv6 and IPv4 addresses and Autonomous System (AS) numbers) also announced that in nine months, 200 million IPv4 addresses have been allocated from IANA to the Regional Internet Registries, meaning that it could be around the same period of time before they’re all gone.

The reality is that IPv4 is able to supply 4.3 billion Internet addresses compared to the approximate 3.4×1038 that IPv6 is thought to support. 

Bigger companies such as Google and Facebook are already working to adopt IPv6 addressing schemes but smaller companies (most likely the ones still using IE6) are struggling to change their ways.

"This is a major milestone in the life of the Internet, and means that allocation of the last blocks of IPv4 to the RIRs is imminent," states Axel Pawlik, Chairman of the Number Resource Organization (NRO), the official representative of the five RIRs. "It is critical that all Internet stakeholders take definitive action now to ensure the timely adoption of IPv6."

The NRO also stated that IPv6 is the "next generation" of the Internet Protocol. According to their announcement, there was a 70% increase of IPv6 allocation and an 8% increase on IPv4 in 2009. Thankfully for us all, it seems people are starting to realize the importance of IPv6 over IPv4.

Image credit: American Registry for Internet Numbers

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36 Comments

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It is only going to get worse as everyone carries around a smart phone that is always connected (4G IP based networks), an internet connection at home, and a 3G/4G internet connection in a connected laptop/tablet/slate (iPad) computer. That is three IP addresses that someone could be reasonably be expected to be running at home. Given there are some 1.97 (wikipedia) billion internet users, it is entirely conceivable that could blow out to 3+ billion IP addresses required in the short term (not including servers).

I already asked my ISP if they were going to provide IPv6 and they said not unless they had to. Well this may be that reason.

Lexcyn said,
I already asked my ISP if they were going to provide IPv6 and they said not unless they had to. Well this may be that reason.

I think this is the exact reason why adoption is lacking. Barely any ISP's in the US provide IPv6 to you're router; making it much harder for techs to learn the technology without going though the pain of IPv4->IPv6 tunneling.

ISP's not providing the service I feel is truly making it much harder to adopt. I know i'm dreading the transition from IPv4 to IPv6. but the results will be much better after time. Another thing lacking with IPv6 are IPS/IDS devices.

soup4you2 said,

I think this is the exact reason why adoption is lacking. Barely any ISP's in the US provide IPv6 to you're router; making it much harder for techs to learn the technology without going though the pain of IPv4->IPv6 tunneling.

ISP's not providing the service I feel is truly making it much harder to adopt. I know i'm dreading the transition from IPv4 to IPv6. but the results will be much better after time. Another thing lacking with IPv6 are IPS/IDS devices.


If the ISPs have problems with it I'll laugh in their faces. They knew it was coming. We've all known. And what have they done? Nothing.

Lexcyn said,
I already asked my ISP if they were going to provide IPv6 and they said not unless they had to. Well this may be that reason.

Seems to be the same way with Shaw...Ignore the problem and hope it goes away...Sadly life doesn't work that way lol

to put IPv6's address space into some sort of perspective - every 'user' will receive a /64 address space which is 18 quintillion IPs....

that means IPv6 will be capable of handling 18 quintillion users, devices or separate address spaces.

gone are the days of NATs, numerous subnets or internal address spaces like 192.168.x.x.

Jdawg683 said,
gone are the days of NATs, numerous subnets or internal address spaces like 192.168.x.x.

There are very good reasons (security) for having NATs and internal address spaces...

Jdawg683 said,
to put IPv6's address space into some sort of perspective - every 'user' will receive a /64 address space which is 18 quintillion IPs....

that means IPv6 will be capable of handling 18 quintillion users, devices or separate address spaces.

IPv6 isn't getting rid of internal networks. So there will still internal addresses. Just not a specific set used only for internal routing.

gone are the days of NATs, numerous subnets or internal address spaces like 192.168.x.x.

IPv6 isn't getting rid of internal networks.

It's all full of **** anyway. Large corporations were given a huge amount in the beginning that they aren't even using now. If they would give up those addresses, there would be plenty for a while longer.

hagjohn said,
It's all full of **** anyway. Large corporations were given a huge amount in the beginning that they aren't even using now. If they would give up those addresses, there would be plenty for a while longer.

this.

hagjohn said,
It's all full of **** anyway. Large corporations were given a huge amount in the beginning that they aren't even using now. If they would give up those addresses, there would be plenty for a while longer.

all that is going to do is delay it. Sooner or later we will all need to use ipv6. As soon as they run out the change over will start to happen very quickly as the world relies on it too much

Not to be rude but this is the 3rd article within 24 hours that is strikingly similar to one that was released just hours prior from another tech site.

StevenMalone77 said,
Not to be rude but this is the 3rd article within 24 hours that is strikingly similar to one that was released just hours prior from another tech site.

Yea maybe you haven't noticed before but that's how it works, new start on one page, channel or whatever and the spread, either using the first poster as source or having the same source as the first poster...

Can someone please correct the very misleading title of this article? One of two things is happening here:
- The author of this article doesn't know the subject area;
- The author is just creating a misleading, sensationalist title.
Or more likely, both.

So what, there's only 5% unallocated to RIR's. Just because IANA has given another /8 to a regional registrar doesn't mean that registrar has allocated everything it has to ISPs, or that those ISPs have allocated everything to end users.

If things were to get "really bad" there's always 'class E' (240.0.0.0/4). And why HP has 15/8 and 16/8 is beyond me. And don't even get me started on the loopback address. Did we really need 16million addresses for the loopback adapter?

DaveHope said,
Can someone please correct the very misleading title of this article? One of two things is happening here:
- The author of this article doesn't know the subject area;
- The author is just creating a misleading, sensationalist title.
Or more likely, both.

So what, there's only 5% unallocated to RIR's. Just because IANA has given another /8 to a regional registrar doesn't mean that registrar has allocated everything it has to ISPs, or that those ISPs have allocated everything to end users.

If things were to get "really bad" there's always 'class E' (240.0.0.0/4). And why HP has 15/8 and 16/8 is beyond me. And don't even get me started on the loopback address. Did we really need 16million addresses for the loopback adapter?

Doesn't matter. Do you know the Official Tagline of Neowin.net, on the homepage?

thenonhacker said,
Do you know the Official Tagline of Neowin.net, on the homepage?
I do. I'm not claiming the article unprofessional though, far from it. I'm just saying the subject is misleading.

Examinus said,
Go on then...

Well, I sort of made my point on that one. 16 Million addresses for just one interface? Sure, multiple addresses are useful for tunnels etc, but a /25 would probably have probably been sufficient.

DaveHope said,
Can someone please correct the very misleading title of this article? One of two things is happening here:
- The author of this article doesn't know the subject area;
- The author is just creating a misleading, sensationalist title.
Or more likely, both.

So what, there's only 5% unallocated to RIR's. Just because IANA has given another /8 to a regional registrar doesn't mean that registrar has allocated everything it has to ISPs, or that those ISPs have allocated everything to end users.

If things were to get "really bad" there's always 'class E' (240.0.0.0/4). And why HP has 15/8 and 16/8 is beyond me. And don't even get me started on the loopback address. Did we really need 16million addresses for the loopback adapter?

The title comes from the NRO - the source of the story. http://www.nro.net/media/remaining-ipv4-address-below-5.html

neufuse said,
Comcast is already rolling out IPv6, so that should get about 30 million addresses freed up

At a nice hefty price. If I were them I'd be selling them for a premium.

ObiWanToby said,

At a nice hefty price. If I were them I'd be selling them for a premium.

....when soon the whole world is going to be using it? Why the hell would you sell it at a premium? All it would take is a competitor selling them for cheaper for that idea be totally turned over.

LiquidSolstice said,

....when soon the whole world is going to be using it? Why the hell would you sell it at a premium? All it would take is a competitor selling them for cheaper for that idea be totally turned over.

Selling the IPv4 addresses. Yeah IPv6 should remain cheap.

neufuse said,
Comcast is already rolling out IPv6, so that should get about 30 million addresses freed up

TekSavvy is also offering beta of IPv6.
The first ISP from Canada, don't think that's as much IP that will be freed but that's a great start

neufuse said,
Comcast is already rolling out IPv6, so that should get about 30 million addresses freed up

Verizon and Comcast are the only notable ISPs with work done on it in the US.

I haven't heard of anyone else, but I'd be very surprised if all the 4G phones did IPv4.

Quick Shot said,
Wow. That's a huge decline in such a short amount of time.

Well the IPv4 system was so inefficient, millions of IP addresses wasted.

Benjy91 said,

Well the IPv4 system was so inefficient, millions of IP addresses wasted.

Like apple, IBM and Xerox buying up entire A Blocks.....

neufuse said,

Like apple, IBM and Xerox buying up entire A Blocks.....

This is the biggest reason IPv4 are running short.

neufuse said,

Like apple, IBM and Xerox buying up entire A Blocks.....


Know your internet history. Back then, the only options were to buy block A, B or C. And you couldn't break them into subnets back then either, except for classful ranges (an A could become multiple B's, but you couldn't break a C into 2 smaller pieces)