IPv6 adoption in America passes 3 million

According to George Michaelson, senior research and development scientist at the Asia Pacific Network Information Centre, IPv6 adoption is growing steadily but has a long way to go, reports Enterprise Networking Planet. Speaking at an IETF 84 panel this week, Michaelson revealed some numbers based on statistical research he has been doing.

The largest base of IPv6 users is in the United States, with an estimated 3.3 million users on the new protocol. This puts national penetration at 1.35 percent of the country's population. Romania leads the world for IPv6 adoption rate, with 8.73 percent. However, this translates to about 756,000 users. Japan is another leader, with almost 2 million users - 1.97 percent user penetration.

China, by contrast, has a poor penetration rate of approximately 0.42 percent, despite the strong need for IPv6 usage due to its enormous population. That small percentage translates into a relatively large 2.12 million users.

"I think you're used to us standing up and saying 'woe is me, woe is me, v6 isn't happening,'" Michaelson said. "But it is actually happening, these are not trivial numbers of people that are now using IPv6 on a routine basis."

Internet Protocol version 6 is intended to succeed IPv4, which does not have enough unique addresses for all the devices in the world. The official launch of IPv6 took place on June 6, 2012.

Source: Enterprise Networking Planet

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19 Comments

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The other reason for lagging ipv6 is simply they don't need too yet.. Sure for new customers they need it, but they still have all the existing ipv4 addresses, there's no need to upgrade them just for the sake of doing it.

Ryoken said,
The other reason for lagging ipv6 is simply they don't need too yet.. Sure for new customers they need it, but they still have all the existing ipv4 addresses, there's no need to upgrade them just for the sake of doing it.

I assume you are referring to NAT. NAT (Network Address Translation) has its own issues when it comes to IP management, and is a bit of a kludge itself - if anything, NAT is a messier kludge than IPv4 is. Also, IP4/NAT definitely didn't have mobile connectivity in mind (mobile connectivity is, in fact, the biggest driver of the adoption of IPv6 outside the US) As routers (home and backbone) get changed out, the reason for the kludge that is NAT will go away, because the need for NAT will also go away.

PGHammer said,

I assume you are referring to NAT. NAT (Network Address Translation) has its own issues when it comes to IP management, and is a bit of a kludge itself - if anything, NAT is a messier kludge than IPv4 is. Also, IP4/NAT definitely didn't have mobile connectivity in mind (mobile connectivity is, in fact, the biggest driver of the adoption of IPv6 outside the US) As routers (home and backbone) get changed out, the reason for the kludge that is NAT will go away, because the need for NAT will also go away.


so because i have both an IP4 and IP6 address in my router, i dont need to NAT my outside port 80 to my server on the LAN? wow! i've been doing this for a long time for no reason apperently.
I would like to know tho how else to forward my traffic from the outside to the inside considering the only current way is NAT as far as i know.

Ryoken said,
The other reason for lagging ipv6 is simply they don't need too yet.. Sure for new customers they need it, but they still have all the existing ipv4 addresses, there's no need to upgrade them just for the sake of doing it.

I think you'll find its more a case of ISPs security and scrutiny. IPv6 is enhentrently insecure due to every device being public facing on the internet. Not only that, but when a device gets issued IPv6 addresses, it actually gets issued several IPv6 for use in different networks. Then they have the whole issue of customer facing staff that have to be trained in IPv6 protocol and the weird new IP addresses. Most people can't even get their head around shortening ::0 let alone that there are now letters in the IP address.

Of course, then there are the firmware and hardware upgrades that need to be performed. For cable modem users, that means a hardware capable modem, and while a docsis 2.x modem can be firmware updated to provide IPv6 at the end point, it has no management ability. So docsis 3.x standard modems will need to be upgraded at the customers end. Then there are the issues with UBRs etc its a lot of man power and expense to upgrade the network to native IPv6. Most IPv6 enabled consumer ISPs are actually using a Tunnel and not providing native IPv6 support.

calimike said,
I'm currently use Ipv4. How do I upgrade to IPv6?

As long as your broadband modem and router support IPv6, you need do nothing - the OS you're running will handle the rest (and every desktop OS under the Sun, and darn near all under the moon as well, has supported IPv6 for years). In my case, as I pointed out, the router is IPv6-hostile (not merely unready) - remove it from the equation and I have full IPv6 connectivity on both sides of my dual-boot setup. The roadblock isn't the desktop (or even the server closet).

PGHammer said,

As long as your broadband modem and router support IPv6, you need do nothing - the OS you're running will handle the rest (and every desktop OS under the Sun, and darn near all under the moon as well, has supported IPv6 for years). In my case, as I pointed out, the router is IPv6-hostile (not merely unready) - remove it from the equation and I have full IPv6 connectivity on both sides of my dual-boot setup. The roadblock isn't the desktop (or even the server closet).

If your modem supports ipv6, you don't even need the router to support it as you'll be provided a block for your personal use. Much like you have with your IPv4 LAN IPs right now, your public facing part of IPv6 will be issued by your ISP, via your modem and your devices on the network will either provide their own 2nd part of the IP for public access (computed by the mac address) or you provide one yourself.

Of course, most people are going to want to keep a router in place for either a basic firewall effect for IPv4 devices (/shrug) or to keep IPv4 services running (noted).

If your ISP doesn't offer IPv6 via your modem you'll need to sign up for one of the tunnel services. If you just want to get online without any static ipv6 address or special settings, go for the gogo6.com gogoclient. It'll configure your PC for IPv6 tunnel with a simple click.
It does provide a few more features such as delegated ipv6 prefix, but if you're wanting them features you might want to try hurricane electric at ipv6.he.net, not as easy to setup but well worth it... even more so if you run domain names. Some fun can be had on ipv6 enabled IRC servers with custom vhosts

calimike said,
I'm currently use Ipv4. How do I upgrade to IPv6?

your modem and router has to support IPv6. And your ISP has to have IPv6 turned on. I bought a modem that supports IPv6, and I bought a router that also have full IPv6 capabilities.
The benefit that I like is the way devices connect over the internet without dealing with NAT. Things just connect and work. Go here: http://www.terena.org/webcam/index.php
If you have IPv6 enabled then it just connects while IPv4 doesn't. The website is a 720HD Live webcam.

calimike said,
I'm currently use Ipv4. How do I upgrade to IPv6?

I looked into this recently. Assuming your computer and router support IPv6, then when your ISP goes native v6 it will be a non-issue for you, maybe a firmware update on your router. If the router doesn't support it then it needs to be replaced.

If you are asking how to get access to the IPv6 internet using an IPv4 connection, that is MUCH more complicated. You can setup a tunnel on your router or computer, but those perform slow. The steps involved are not hard, you just need a fairly details understanding of how IPv6 works, which most people don't have. It took me the better part of a weekend to get a tunnel working as expected on an IOS Cisco Router.

Check out this webpage if you are interested in a free tunnel: http://tunnelbroker.net/

The lag on IPv6 adoption in the US has been in two areas - ISPs and routers. Desktops and servers have LONG been IPv6-ready (Windows - both client and server - since Windows XP Service Pack 2 and Server 2003 R2, for example); however, what comes between the desktop/server and the Internet (routers) has been lagging. Comcast and Verizon are among the leaders in IPv6 deployment in the US (especially the Freedom and Beltway Regions); however, even in those two regions, router changeout by individual customers is Iagging (largely due to a poor economy); for instance, my own router (a free lease from Comcast due to a router promotion of two years back) is IPv6-hostile - if I purchase my own IPv6-ready router, what do I do with the rouer it replaced (since I don't own it)?

PGHammer said,
The lag on IPv6 adoption in the US has been in two areas - ISPs and routers.

Actually it is more routers and modems than ISPs. Most people don't know what the hell an "Internet protocol" is. And most routers today have IPv6 turned off. The only way this will work is if the manufacturers have IPv6 turned on in their new products and in the firmware they push out to their current products.

PGHammer said,
The lag on IPv6 adoption in the US has been in two areas - ISPs and routers. Desktops and servers have LONG been IPv6-ready (Windows - both client and server - since Windows XP Service Pack 2 and Server 2003 R2, for example); however, what comes between the desktop/server and the Internet (routers) has been lagging. Comcast and Verizon are among the leaders in IPv6 deployment in the US (especially the Freedom and Beltway Regions); however, even in those two regions, router changeout by individual customers is Iagging (largely due to a poor economy); for instance, my own router (a free lease from Comcast due to a router promotion of two years back) is IPv6-hostile - if I purchase my own IPv6-ready router, what do I do with the rouer it replaced (since I don't own it)?

You probably are paying some small fee to lease that router, if you buy your own just turn it in and have them take it off your account. I know Comcast gives you the option, I think it is $5 a month. Others might just include that cost into your monthly bill.

I wonder how many of those users are just people with tunnels, I'm in Australia but my IPv6 data goes through a data center in California.

The_Decryptor said,
I wonder how many of those users are just people with tunnels, I'm in Australia but my IPv6 data goes through a data center in California.

Welcome to the internet.

The_Decryptor said,
I wonder how many of those users are just people with tunnels, I'm in Australia but my IPv6 data goes through a data center in California.

Very good point, those like Hurricane etc tunnel broker their worldwide IPv6 connections via proxies in the USA.

Could very well be inflating the US figures, where they are actual users in Australia and other places.

The_Decryptor said,
I wonder how many of those users are just people with tunnels, I'm in Australia but my IPv6 data goes through a data center in California.

There is a lot more native IPv6 now, comcast the nations largest ISP is switching all their CMTS's to native IPv6 right now, they have all the ARRIS ones switched, and working on Cisco ones right now... They already have a pretty good percentage of their customers IPv6 capable, they just need a IPv6 capable modem, and most DOCSIS3 modems are... so the more they get people to D3 modems the higher IPv6 rates at the CPE area. they already have hundreds of thousands of people on IPv6 native alone.

The_Decryptor said,
I wonder how many of those users are just people with tunnels, I'm in Australia but my IPv6 data goes through a data center in California.

That is possible, but there are a number of major ISPs here that offer native IPv6 to customers, no tunnel needed. None in my area sadly, but they do exist. I am glad to see ISPs move in this dirrection. It was frustrating to see year after year no one wanting to touch IPv6.