IPv6 to power 'city of the future'

The city of Harrisonburg, Virginia, will experience a wide variety of new Internet-based services with the rollout of citywide Internet Protocol Version 6. Harrisonburg will become the first U.S. city to have a citywide IPv6 network in the third quarter of the year, said Mark Bayliss, director of the Harrisonburg Project and CEO of Visual Link Incorporated, a Winchester, Virginia-based Internet service provider. Harrisonburg has branded itself the "city of the future" and hopes to be a reminder of IPv6's advantages over IPv4. Harrisonburg has partnered with James Madison University on the project, and the university will use the network for delivering virtual learning services, added Christopher Harz, organizer of the U.S. IPv6 Summit in Reston, Virginia. "Eventually, this will involve training, classrooms and education for a whole bunch of disciplines we haven't even thought of yet," Harz said.

Harz and Bayliss both have many ideas and implementations for IPv6. The way IPv6 connects computers will facilitate mobile commerce, enabling mobile-phone users to buy tickets and download a bar code that can be displayed on the phone instead of carrying a physical ticket. In addition, IPv6's more efficient network routing will allow for the cost of providing Internet-based video services to drop by huge amounts. Because it has nearly unlimited network address space, IPv6 will also allow documents to have their own network address, creating a new field of authentication and Web-based notary services. Harrisonburg will also provide IPv6 for its emergency response agencies, including voice, data and map services. The city plans to start demonstrating eight IPv6 products soon: a test area for military and civilian applications is slated for the third quarter of this year.

News source: ComputerWorld

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17 Comments

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IP6 is much more secure than IP4, the main advantage (after the address space issue) will be that email will be more secure, at the moment email is just a joke, it is no where near secure enough to be the de facto communication standard.

enabling mobile-phone users to buy tickets and download a bar code that can be displayed on the phone

That's been available in Germany for public transportation fares for quite a while.

Because it has nearly unlimited network address space

The same was said of IPv4, and look how saturated it is now.

Reminds me of the "who will ever need more than 640k conventional memory?"

except with IPv6 it would be hard to saturate it consdiering a person could have a million addresses per person... theres what 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 addresses? and IPv4 has what 4,294,967,296 addresses? thats still 4 billion addresses for each IPv4 address

neufuse said,
except with IPv6 it would be hard to saturate it consdiering a person could have a million addresses per person... theres what 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 addresses? and IPv4 has what 4,294,967,296 addresses? thats still 4 billion addresses for each IPv4 address

Actually there are 2^128 addresses, hence: 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456.

That is 79,228,162,514,264,337,593,543,950,336 times more than IPv4.

bah humbug to IPv6, IPv4 is only half full and its alot easier to type 12 digits than 32 alphanumerics, Its like typing in a serial key everytime you want to manually connect to somone.

It's because of NAT, we have run out of IPv4 addresses, if the idea is to connect every person.

We have just over 4 billion IP addresses, and over 6 billion humans, so there we can't have each person connected unless we start doing odd things with routing.

Am I the only one not really looking forward to IPv6? I mean IPv4 addresses are hard to remember, but IPv6 addresses are much longer.

InsaneNutter said,
Thats why we have domains! ;)

And how many gamers have a dns name instead of an IP address when hosting and joining internet games? ;)

Me: Hey Bob, whats your IP so I can connect to your game?
Bob: 2001:0db8:0000:0000:0000:0000:1428:57ab
Me: Whoah!

TCLN Ryster said,

And how many gamers have a dns name instead of an IP address when hosting and joining internet games? ;)

Me: Hey Bob, whats your IP so I can connect to your game?
Bob: 2001:0db8:0000:0000:0000:0000:1428:57ab
Me: Whoah!

no [dash] ip [dot] com does quite well. I use it for my internet games (among other things).

TCLN Ryster said,

And how many gamers have a dns name instead of an IP address when hosting and joining internet games? ;)

Me: Hey Bob, whats your IP so I can connect to your game?
Bob: 2001:0db8:0000:0000:0000:0000:1428:57ab
Me: Whoah!

Good thing that that can be reduced to:

2001:db8::1428:57ab

But you'd know that, since you copied it right out of the wikipedia article :P

MioTheGreat said,
But you'd know that, since you copied it right out of the wikipedia article :P

Rumbled :P

Yeah you can omit multiple groups of zeros with :: and can miss of leading zeros in each group. But not all addresses are going to have that many zeros to remove

I didn't know documents could have their own IPs! but considering the exaggerated number of IPs there can be with IPv6... 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 it doesn't surprise me.