Iran removes block on Gmail again after a week

Iran's sudden removal of Gmail access has been a cause of quite a lot of discussion. Despite government promises that they would have the 'Fajr' email service ('Dawn' in English) up and running before too long, it seems people want their gigabytes of free inbox storage more than they want an Iranian alternative.

The Iranian parliament is up in arms alongside the population. In what was surely the most neutrally worded statement of the past week, Hussein Garrousi of the Parliamentarian committee on industry told an independent newspaper that "some problems have emerged through the blocking of Gmail".

Access to Gmail was revoked on September 24, but things are back to normal. What you gain in one area is lost in another, so now their attention is on YouTube. Mohammad Reza Miri explained the following to a news agency:

We absolutely do not want YouTube to be accessible. That is why the telecommunications ministry is seeking a solution to fix the problem to block YouTube under the HTTPS protocol while leaving Gmail accessible.

In other words they blocked the wrong site. Good job, lads. Iran has given YouTube the cold shoulder since the election controversy within the country after the 2009 re-election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.  The government was caught doing a cheeky bit of Photoshopping back then in an attempt to increase support for the returning president.

Source: Google

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5 Comments

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"In other words they blocked the wrong site. Good job, lads."
I think you'll find they knew full well what they were blocking (and indeed had commented on it) and they've just unblocked it in the interim of finding a better blocking method.

Poor choice of words right there.

articuno1au said,
"In other words they blocked the wrong site. Good job, lads."
I think you'll find they knew full well what they were blocking (and indeed had commented on it) and they've just unblocked it in the interim of finding a better blocking method.

Poor choice of words right there.

This is what happens when you give governments control over the internet as a whole. What strives to be a more stable service, and one that the world is now more and more relying on by the vast majority of the world from banking to the food people eat. Along somes a government who, in their own interests decide to block a site for a little while, enough to create 'what if' in peoples heads or enough to distrupt work flow for people and the restore the service as if nothing happened.
Its not going to help Iran gain any movement on the technology front, people will start to second guess if they can do any real international trade with them due to fears of communications being blocked.
And its not simply a matter of not using a @gmail address, google provides email hosting that a lot of businesses use with custom domains. They also get blocked as a result of iran's silly businesss tactics.

What this amounts to is an internal DDOS attacks to their own country and its people.