Is Dell not out of the Windows RT business after all?

Earlier today, we reported that Dell had stopped taking orders for its only Windows RT product, the XPS 10, on its website. That means that Microsoft is currently the only company selling a Windows RT device. However, a new report claims that Dell does indeed have an ARM-based Windows tablet in the works that it will announced next week in a press event.

Geek World Central has the hardware specs, as well as an image, of the alleged Dell ARM tablet. The report claims the unnamed product will have an 10.8 inch screen with a resolution of 1920x1080. It is supposed to have a Qualcomm processor, 2 GB of RAM, 32 GB of storage and Office 2013 Home and Student installed. Battery life is supposed to be 10 hours.

Dell will show two new Windows 8.1 tablets, both using Intel's Bay Trail processor, at the same event, according to the report. One will have a 10.8 inch screen with a resolution of 1920x1080 with 2 GB of RAM and 10 hours of battery life, but will have 64 GB of storage and a built in 4G LTE antenna. Dell is also supposed to show off more of its previously revealed 8-inch Venue tablet at this press event. The new report claims it will have 2 GB of RAM, 32 GB of storage and Office 2013 Home and Student 2013 installed.

There's no word yet on what Dell will charge for any of its new tablets nor any specific launch dates. However, if it is releasing a new Windows RT product, it will be the only one of the four original third party Windows RT OEMs that decided to continue with a second generation product.

Thanks to dn_nb for pointing out this story in our news comments!

Source: Geek World Central | Image via Geek World Central

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> Is Dell not out of the Windows RT business after all?

So not only are we not sure of the previous report, there's doubt about the retraction also. Am I getting this right? Is this what journalism has come down to? Pure speculation?

I have no problem with discussions of any sort...so long as unverified items are not being passed off as "news". With "articles" like these, Neowin is providing less and less value for me all the time. And yeah, I know exactly what sort of response I'm gonna get for this, and the answer is, I'm considering it.

I just registered cause I saw this news comming on all kind of techsites.. We shall really see what dell will be bringing next wednesday.

The one thing that is never mentioned in the Surface ARM vs. Intel argument is that only ARM is able to do connected standby, going into a very low power state and still able to receive emails, Skype, etc.

You do know that surface pro 1 has a non-haswell processor, right?

Also, for it to work, you have to have windows 8.1, IINM.

P.S. Atoms don't have that limitation. Connected standby works for them on windows 8.

Ah, yes. Forgot that it's currently only supported on 32-bit versions of windows 8. My bad.

Still, the feature is actually supported by the CPU and OS. They just need to enable it on 64-bit versions.

So, MS will be offering 200g of Skydrive for two years as a value add to their new ARM Surface. What would Dell add if they did another ARM tablet?

Also, what's the point of running Win32 apps on an 8" tablet? I can't really see it being a satisfying experience with mouse driven interfaces. 8" seems like it should be ARM territory - get the pricing down a bit more but still offer good performance.

"Anybody who says that MS should just kill Windows RT has absolutely no clue about the future of Windows and personal computing in general."

Neither do you, it seems.

COKid said,
"Anybody who says that MS should just kill Windows RT has absolutely no clue about the future of Windows and personal computing in general."

Neither do you, it seems.

seriously, do you really think it's worth posting a comment when you have nothing to say?

Funny how people jumped to the conclusion that dell was abandoning Windows RT just because they were clearing their stocks of current devices despite the fact they said a month ago they were committed to Windows RT.

reposting here what I said earlier, before someone says clueless things about Windows RT again:
=====

Windows RT still has a bright future. Windows RT will basically become the new Windows Home edition.

in 5years from now, Windows RT will certainly replace Home versions of windows, and will certainly be available for x86 devices too. As we can see from the way Microsoft is naming Surface RT 2 (they're simply calling it Surface 2), Microsoft is pushing Windows RT for home users, and windows 8 for professionals and advanced users, which is a smart move because win32 compatibility should be limited to professional and server versions of Windows, and no longer available to regular users.

having unsandboxed (win32) apps on a consumer OS is no longer viable because most people are too easily tricked into installing malicious apps or apps bundling toolbars and adwares on their system. The same problems exists on osx and desktop Linux. None of the current desktop OSes are malware proof / idiot proof. That's why bringing windows RT to desktop and laptop PCs will totally make sense, once people can find everything they need in the windows store.

even Windows RT 8.0 has much more features than Android and iOS, and once the Windows Store becomes popular enough, most OEMs will start building Windows RT devices again.


Anybody who says that MS should just kill Windows RT has absolutely no clue about the future of Windows and personal computing in general.

@Link8506

I totally agree with you. MS absolutely can't give up on RT. ARM OS is their wild card and good timing introducing window 8 run on Intel and ARM. Unlike XP tablet timing wise.

While the prospect of losing the desktop, even for home users, is something I found very troubling, you make quite an interesting point that I can't just dismiss out of hand.

Definitely food for thought.

^ That

Even if MS was the only one building RT devices, they aren't going to bin it. It does have a lot of potential if they keep building on it and improving it. Manufacturers immediately go where the money is. While RT doesn't have much right NOW I think that in another couple of years it'll turn around. It's lacking in apps but that's really about it. I'll probably end up with a Surface 2, myself, just for office alone. Plus it looks sexy.

link8506 said,

Anybody who says that MS should just kill Windows RT has absolutely no clue about the future of Windows and personal computing in general.

No, it just means they don't like the direction Microsoft is going with pushing Modern UI and a store-only model for app distribution. In other words trading a more open OS for a closed one.

domboy said,

No, it just means they don't like the direction Microsoft is going with pushing Modern UI and a store-only model for app distribution. In other words trading a more open OS for a closed one.

I'm not a huge fan of store-only model. As a developer, it makes our job more difficult.
But users need more security. The current model was not designed with internet in mind. In the 90s nobody would have imagined that in the 2000s there would be so many criminal groups trying to profit from malwares, or companies making profit from adwares. Even today, osx/linux users still don't realize their app model is as vulnerable as win32.

you may not like how Metro looks visually, but WinRT itself is a required and long awaited "secure enough" platform.

There is only one, single drawback with windows RT; apps. It's miles ahead of iOS and android in any other aspect.

Once the apps come, it'll start to rise. Until then, MS shouldn't give up on it, IMO.

My girlfriend had an iPad - the $900 64gb 4g model, and she gave it to her mom; She had the entertainment apps on her iPhone, and the tablet was useless.

I have a Surface, and while the app selection makes it less useful, I find the only thing I can't do on it that I do on my desktop is program. Otherwise it's just as useful and can even double as a casual gaming device.

I really want RT to succeed in the long term as a home user OS. No matter how advanced the version of windows, no matter how much you preach vigilance, the average user will always install software that fills explorer/ firefox/ chrome with half a screen of toolbars.

maybe you missed this part of the article


Dell will show two new Windows 8.1 tablets, both using Intel's Bay Trail processor,
There's no word yet on what Dell will charge for any of its new tablets