IT consultants claim "we're seeing customers flee Google Apps for Office 365"

Microsoft has been trying to promote Office 365 as a better solution for businesses over Google Apps, including some recent video promotions starring Rob Schneider as "Google Docs". This week, Microsoft continued their campaign against Google's office software solution with a blog post written by people who have had experience in installing Office 365 in many different companies.

The post was authored by Sean McNeill, Cloud Services Specialist, and John Santiago, General Manager, at Catapult Systems, described by Microsoft as a company that works with mid and large businesses to provide "application development, enterprise solutions and infrastructure services." Their blog post says that they have recently seen many of their customers "flee Google Apps for Office 365." That apparently includes three unnamed companies in the last six months that have between 400 and 1,200 users.

McNeill and Santiago describe one specific incident at a company where an executive assistant was using Outlook on her own instead of her company's assigned Google Apps:

When we told her we were there to help her company move back to Office, her reaction was, "Thank God!" She wasn't the only one. After using Google Apps for a month, employees across the organization were exerting so much pressure on the IT department that the company decided to switch to Office 365.

Some of the reasons cited by McNeill and Santiago for ditching Google Apps for Office 365 include losing their designed format on Word and Excel files, paying extra for third party tools not included with Google Apps and simply missing the use of Microsoft Outlook.

Of course, this post was written on the official Microsoft Office blog, so it's a tad bias, but it once again illustrates that Microsoft is continuing to hammer away at Google as the two companies compete for the huge audience that is looking for a cloud software suite.

Source: Microsoft

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Raa said,
Depends if cost is a factor or not.
Even figuring in cost, you can't. It's not a binary thing when it comes to "is free" and "costs money" TCO is a real thing. Office365 is worth every penny it costs. If you have an information worker who just needs web access it costs nearly nothing ($5/u/m). Want office on up to 5 devices ($12.50/u/m). You can mix and match depending on your users needs. Google's offering just isn't worth it.

startscreennope said,
MS gives a few very small sized company sweetheart deals to switch to Office 365, writes a PR piece about it. Sorry, it's still not working.

And on what planet do you live on exactly?

Was anyone using Google Apps in the first place? I know a lot of casual users have used it but not business users. Web applications just aren't very good when you have a lot of work to do.

Spicoli said,
Was anyone using Google Apps in the first place? I know a lot of casual users have used it but not business users. Web applications just aren't very good when you have a lot of work to do.

Uhh... Office 365 is also a "web application"... this isnt talking about the Office 2010 you install from a DVD.

Depends on which license you get. the base is web apps. anything above base includes the full version of office 2013 pro plus for each user.

sao123 said,

Uhh... Office 365 is also a "web application"... this isnt talking about the Office 2010 you install from a DVD.

Not entirely true. Depending on which plan a company purchases they also get the full Office Professional Plus suite to install on five machines per user.

Actually, O365 is a traditional application suite and is only different in installation method - it's streamed from a central server. (I've migrated from one to the other quite easily, because there was, literally, zero difference in terms of functionality. None at all.) You are doubtless thinking of Office Web Apps - which IS different from a traditional application suite. (By the way, OWA is included - at zero extra charge - with EVERY license of O365/2010 and above.) Please- don't mix up the two.

sao123 said,

Uhh... Office 365 is also a "web application"... this isnt talking about the Office 2010 you install from a DVD.

You might want to actually try Office 365 instead of guessing. There's free web applications but you can download install the native application when you subscribe.

sao123 said,

Uhh... Office 365 is also a "web application"... this isnt talking about the Office 2010 you install from a DVD.

Depends on the plan you get. Their higher tier plans also include the desktop apps. But even without the desktop apps, the web apps are nearly identical and much more user friendly than Google Apps...

I can say from experience that Google Docs is adequate, but I prefer Office 365. I find the mail filtering in Gmail to be terrible, though.

My previous company used some form of that Open Office crap, and I can say without question that it is terrible. It was embarrassingly bad actually.

You CAN use Outlook with GMail - in fact, Outlook is my preferred GMail client of choice (it's been that since I've HAD GMail). If anything, there is less reason to use any other e-mail client than ever since Outlook has hands-free IMAP4 support (GMail uses non-standard - even for IMAP4 - settings; Outlook is, in fact, the ONLY e-mail client to successfully configure itself for GMail other than Apple Mail, which has to cheat by using iCloud. That's right - as good as Mail has gotten on OS X - primarily due to the aforementioned iCloud integration - Outlook still eats its lunch.)

The Ministry of Education here is using Google Apps and I just hate the interface for Google Mail. I have help my bosses secretary just to do a reply and add an attachment. I like Office simply because its a nicer experience to work in. To be honest, if you are working on one page documents, either platform will achieve the same result. If you are doing heavy stuff with a lot of formatting like indented tabs, borders, specially formatted tables, then Word is gonna be your best choice. Then again, who is constantly creating documents like that? Besides, you can do that in Word 95. I can run Word 95 on Windows 8 32 bit. Then again, who wants to run Word 95?

a client of mine is currently 'attempting' to switch to google apps... it's a ****ing disaster.

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