It's official: Microsoft and Nokia announce Windows Phone 7 partnership

Microsoft and Nokia have confirmed the two companies will work together to take Microsoft's recently released Windows Phone 7 operating system to the next level.

While the news won't come as a surprise to many, Microsoft says the strategic partnership will allow both companies to use their "complementary strengths" to create a new "global mobile ecosystem" which will almost certainly take Windows Phone 7 market share to a whole new level.

As part of the partnership, Nokia will make Windows Phone 7 their "principal smartphone strategy" (in other words, it's going to be their main operating system for all their phones) with plans to work in partnership with Microsoft on both software and hardware features, focusing first amongst other things on the Windows Phone 7's imaging capabilities. They'll also collaborate with Microsoft on marketing and the Windows Phone 7 roadmap, while assisting with hardware design and language support.

In a big win for Microsoft's search engine, Nokia will make Bing the default search engine across their range of mobile products, with Microsoft adCenter to power advertising on the service. On the flipside, Nokia will allow Microsoft to use their Nokia Maps technology, which will be integrated in turn into Bing and adCenter to "form a unique local search and advertising experience."

“I am excited about this partnership with Nokia,” Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO said in a statement today. “Ecosystems thrive when fueled by speed, innovation and scale. The partnership announced today provides incredible scale, vast expertise in hardware and software innovation and a proven ability to execute.”

Nokia's app store and content will be made available in the Windows Phone 7 marketplace, while Nokia's "extensive" operator billing agreements will allow Windows Phone 7 devices to be sold in countries where access to credit cards is low.

It's expected the deal -- which still needs to pass a number of regulatory approvals and checks before being finalized -- will see Windows Phone 7's market share grow considerably with devices available for potentially lower price points and with varying specifications, and could be the boost the relatively new entrant into the smartphone race needs to compete with the likes of Google's Android offering and Apple's iPhone.

Update: Nokia have now confirmed the company's Symbian software will become a "franchise platform", with MeeGo soon to be open sourced with an emphasis placed on "longer-term market exploration of next generation devices, platforms and user experiences." Nokia says they will still ship a MeeGo device later this year despite today's news.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Opera Mini for iPad to be shown off at next week's Mobile World Congress

Next Story

TechSpot: Tablets of 2011 - What to Look For

95 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Nokia lost an enormous share on the smartphone market, having said that its biggest share has been and still is low med priced devices. Of course eventually as android devices will get cheaper, that share is gonna shrink dramatically. Currently however it looks to me like Nokia is saving Microsoft from an epic fail than the other way around.

The benefits for Microsoft are clear - it eliminates a competitor (Symbian is still ahead of MS particularly if we consider the lackluster market performance of Windows Phone 7) and at the same time captures a major contender in the mobile telephony market.

However, it is unclear what Nokia gets in exchange - Windows Mobile market share declined sharply over the last two years and its new incarnation Windows Phone 7 has barely changed the situation (price of LG Optimus has been reduced by 40% despite no announcements of new WP7 roducts). Instead of having the tools to define its own product strategy, Nokia becomes dependent on Microsoft while the other MS partners (LG, HTC, Samsung) have a multi-OS strategy.

It is true that Nokia missed the boat while persisting in a outdated user interface with Symbian, while the market was quickly moving into a touch interface. However, under the hood the Nokia engine is solid and largely reliable. Windows phone 7 is a product with a number of functional and technical limitations - from which the absence of multitask is just an aspect. It seems to have been designed to leverage other MS products (Zune, Hotmail, X-box, Windows Live) while many of these are not even available in many countries where Nokia is well represented.

I think the 15% drop in NOkia stock is very telling about what investors think of the impact of Nokia's decision ...

The benefits for Microsoft are clear - it eliminates a competitor (Symbian is still ahead of MS particularly if we consider the lackluster market performance of Windows Phone 7) and at the same time captures a major contender in the mobile telephony market.

However, it is unclear what Nokia gets in exchange - Windows Mobile market share declined sharply over the last two years and its new incarnation Windows Phone 7 has barely changed the situation (price of LG Optimus has been reduced by 40% despite no announcements of new WP7 roducts). Instead of having the tools to define its own product strategy, Nokia becomes dependent on Microsoft while the other MS partners (LG, HTC, Samsung) have a multi-OS strategy.

It is true that Nokia missed the boat while persisting in a outdated user interface with Symbian, while the market was quickly moving into a touch interface. However, under the hood the Nokia engine is solid and largely reliable. Windows phone 7 is a product with a number of functional and technical limitations - from which the absence of multitask is just an aspect. It seems to have been designed to leverage other MS products (Zune, Hotmail, X-box, Windows Live) while many of these are not even available in many countries where Nokia is well represented.

I think the 15% drop in NOkia stock is very telling about what investors think of the impact of Nokia's decision ...

so much fanboyism around here! everybody has different tastes, relax. i know everybody wants their own device or their prefered OS doing well in the market, but in the end the consumer will make which decision is best for him/her.

neoxphuse said,
so much fanboyism around here! everybody has different tastes, relax. i know everybody wants their own device or their prefered OS doing well in the market, but in the end the consumer will make which decision is best for him/her.

Well said.

recursive said,

How about Nokia's?

Nokia tanked, and Microsoft sank when the market opened. I'm not too surprised by Nokia's drop. However, I really thought this would be a boon for MSFT, so I was surprised by how this played out (and paid for it dearly!).

Android sucks here's to Nokia and Windows Phone making a nice splash. If droid is so good and all, why is there so much fragmentation, oh thats right because it costs manufacturers and arm and two legs to keep the phones updated. Yea droid is good. I'll stick to windows thank you.

Android is fine, WP7 is fine, iOS is fine. They're all good OSes. They have their strengths and weaknesses, but none of them suck.

People in US and Canada, have no or very less idea about Asian and European Markets. People in Asia, prefer Nokia over other phones because it's hardware quality.

Android is not very popular in India, and iPhone is approx. Rs31,000 (~$700), also it's locked to a carrier. Indian executives use BlackBerrys' are only when provided by their employers, due to it's not so good cameras and other multimedia features.

People generally have faith in Nokia, and Microsoft is a very trusted brand (most people don't see it as evil). So Nokia+Microsoft would be the best package for Asian Smartphone Market.

Though iPhone is quite popular in Europe but it doesn't have US like market dominance. Currently Android is leading in Europe, but Nokia's smartphone market share in Europe is much better than that in US.

Since Nokia is not seen as a dying company in Asia and Europe, this partnership would work out there.

In US, Market is dominated by iPhone and Android. Nokia is dying and WP7 in a new and untested platform. Road would be difficult in US, but with time things can work out. But Microsoft has to continue updating it's OS (coz direct update is a huge benefit over Android), and aggressive Market campaigns.

People in US and Canada, have no or very less idea about Asian and European Markets. People in Asia, prefer Nokia over other phones because it's hardware quality.

Android is not very popular in India, and iPhone is approx. Rs31,000 (~$700), also it's locked to a carrier. Indian executives use BlackBerrys' are only when provided by their employers, due to it's not so good cameras and other multimedia features.

People generally have faith in Nokia, and Microsoft is a very trusted brand (most people don't see it as evil). So Nokia+Microsoft would be the best package for Asian Smartphone Market.

Though iPhone is quite popular in Europe but it doesn't have US like market dominance. Currently Android is leading in Europe, but Nokia's smartphone market share in Europe is much better than that in US.

Since Nokia is not seen as a dying company in Asia and Europe, this partnership would work out there.

In US, Market is dominated by iPhone and Android. Nokia is dying and WP7 in a new and untested platform. Road would be difficult in US, but with time things can work out. But Microsoft has to continue updating it's OS (coz direct update is a huge benefit over Android), and aggressive Market campaigns.

"I don't want my Android, WP7 or iOS look and function exactly the same as other OS, I want uniqueness."

No matter what new feature comes out by whoever, you'll have uniqueness for about 5 minutes.

speedstr3789 said,
"I don't want my Android, WP7 or iOS look and function exactly the same as other OS, I want uniqueness."

No matter what new feature comes out by whoever, you'll have uniqueness for about 5 minutes.

Yeah ... I want *good features* in my phone. If someone else thinks of a good feature, I don't want it to be ignored solely because my OS developer wants to be unique.

Nokia isnt dead theyve just been ****ing at the low end of the market and have made sweet FA into the smartphone market and have had sweet FA innovation in that space either. Its a good partnership for both companies alot of positives should come from this.

Only uninformed people have been buying nokia devices the last few years (and many companies for their employees :rollseyes:). Nokia is virtually dead, not sure if this deal will save this boring mobilephone company...

vacs said,
Only uninformed people have been buying nokia devices the last few years (and many companies for their employees :rollseyes:) ...

And people who simply want a phone to make calls and receive/send SMSes (not everyone wants/needs a toaster and a coffee machine in their pockets)

vacs said,
Only uninformed people have been buying nokia devices the last few years (and many companies for their employees :rollseyes:). Nokia is virtually dead, not sure if this deal will save this boring mobilephone company...

Depends on where you live in the world, and what specific functionality your company is needing that may make Nokia an ideal choice.

Even if you live in the USA, like myself, it was Nokia that shoved Motorola and Sony in the 90s to get good phones at a reasonable cost into the hands of a lot of people.

From your perspective of the world Nokia may be virtually dead, but in reality of most of the world, Nokia is still a rather important name that isn't going anywhere for a while. (Seriously, Google/Bing/Wiki Nokia - it will give you a new perspective on them.)

Well, it is not because Nokia was important in the 90s that it will necessarily keep pace with the market today. Sentimentalism does not save a company, and we've seen this many times over the years, haven't we?

Now, Nokia wasn't and isn't dead. This deal covers the smartphone line of the company only and, as you guys said yourselves, there are other people with other needs out there. Maybe Neowin readers all use smartphones so, for them, Nokia doesn't exist. But that doesn't mean they are dead.

Personally, I really like this deal. Competition and variety may not be as great as everybody says. Fewer mobile OSes, for instance, will help grow the amount of apps on these devices. It is cheaper and easier for small developers to support fewer OSes than a huge ecosystem. So users of these popular systems will benefit from the support of developers. That, IMHO, overshadows any "sentimentalism" for a platform, a name or a company history. So long Symbian.

This is good news, I might just be replacing my current Nokia E71 with another Nokia (I won't buy Symbian again though)

Now... time for the "Turkeys" to take on the "Eagle"... While the Eagle might not be getting any sleepless nights yet, it had better start rebuilding it's nest!

Suave Sagittarian said,
Now... time for the "Turkeys" to take on the "Eagle"... While the Eagle might not be getting any sleepless nights yet, it had better start rebuilding it's nest!

How you it take you to make that one up?

Seriously though, this partnership will hopefully mean good things for competition. Can't see myself moving to WP7 anytime soon however, being a heavy google apps user.

SuperHans said,

How you it take you to make that one up?

Seriously though, this partnership will hopefully mean good things for competition. Can't see myself moving to WP7 anytime soon however, being a heavy google apps user.

Eagles fly high, but turkeys don't get sucked into jet engines

SuperHans said,

How you it take you to make that one up?

Seriously though, this partnership will hopefully mean good things for competition. Can't see myself moving to WP7 anytime soon however, being a heavy google apps user.

Lol... it just came to me by divine inspiration!

But yeah, you're right. The more the competition, the better it is for us consumers.

20legend said,

Eagles fly high, but turkeys don't get sucked into jet engines

Lol... good one mate!

yowan said,
So what will Nokia do with all these millions of Symbian devices, will they get an upgrade to WP7?

Nope, buring bridges is good ...

XIII said,
Nope, buring bridges is good ...

I suppose you have proof that those devices won't get an upgrade, do you?

yowan said,
So what will Nokia do with all these millions of Symbian devices, will they get an upgrade to WP7?

Why on earth would Nokia update their old handsets to WP7? That makes no sense at all. Never mind that there's probably very few of them that meet the WP7 minimum requirements, but all of the software people have BOUGHT for them wouldn't work. It'd be like Apple replacing all Macs running MacOS with iOS - how do you think that'd go down?

good news, but what would microsoft do with the OVI store, those are qt and wrt programs, they are not compatible with wp7

XerXis said,
good news, but what would microsoft do with the OVI store, those are qt and wrt programs, they are not compatible with wp7

Throw them into the fire

XerXis said,
good news, but what would microsoft do with the OVI store, those are qt and wrt programs, they are not compatible with wp7

Qt may work in Windows Phone. Isn't it a cross platform app framework? Pardon me it i'm wrong.

yowan said,
So Symbian is dead or not?

Dead for High end smartphones. But Symbian is fine for cheap smartphone like Nokia 5320 XpressMusic, it's only $130.

Nokia can't join the Android Team because the politics of Android Team Founders and Partners. Hope that this join venture will help to rise up nokia and enhance the Windows Phone 7 experience.

Kushan said,
One burning platform is just as good as another, eh?

Should have gone Android.


How can I give you rep for this comment ? By this move, Nokia officially becomes another OEM at Microsoft disposal. This will stop innovations, which is bad for the consumers...

Kushan said,
One burning platform is just as good as another, eh?

Should have gone Android.

Why? HTC are doing well with Android, Nokia can push out Windows 7 to the masses and the iphone will continue to sell well. Hopefully this will make both hardware and software manufactures continue to be more innovate and develop their chosen platforms to try and be the best. Don't forget they'll all be fighting to get you on board so price wars are inevitable as well.

As a consumer that's surely a good thing?

XIII said,

How can I give you rep for this comment ? By this move, Nokia officially becomes another OEM at Microsoft disposal. This will stop innovations, which is bad for the consumers...

Trollololololol.

XIII said,

Does Kin ring any bell ? Enough said.
Whoa, companies can never have failed products right? Obviously not in your fantasy troll world.

And btw the Kin was a Microsoft project, not some OEM that was "disposed off."

Nokia, in this case, will just be like Samsung, HTC, LG, and Dell. All of whom are committed to supporting and selling WP7 devices...especially Samsung who plan to make more WP7 devices in 2011 than Android ones. Oh but don't let facts come in the way of your rock.

/- Razorfold said,
Whoa, companies can never have failed products right? Obviously not in your fantasy troll world.

And btw the Kin was a Microsoft project, not some OEM that was "disposed off."

Nokia, in this case, will just be like Samsung, HTC, LG, and Dell. All of whom are committed to supporting and selling WP7 devices...especially Samsung who plan to make more WP7 devices in 2011 than Android ones. Oh but don't let facts come in the way of your rock.


Dude, why don't you crawl out of your rock and read the damn articles? Nokia goes full WP7 while other phone makers do have Android handsets to backup sales as well. If WP7 goes down, Nokia will go along with it. Nokia made a dangerous gamble this time by not going multiplatform or at least keep the Symbian alive.
Also the market will lack competitors, what will that lead ? Major competitors like iOS, Android, WP7 copy each others and no innovation can flourish... Before you post something else, please stop and think for a moment if what I said is true before you post. I don't want my Android, WP7 or iOS look and function exactly the same as other OS, I want uniqueness.

XIII said,

Dude, why don't you crawl out of your rock and read the damn articles? Nokia goes full WP7 while other phone makers do have Android handsets to backup sales as well. If WP7 goes down, Nokia will go along with it. Nokia made a dangerous gamble this time by not going multiplatform or at least keep the Symbian alive.
Also the market will lack competitors, what will that lead ? Major competitors like iOS, Android, WP7 copy each others and no innovation can flourish... Before you post something else, please stop and think for a moment if what I said is true before you post. I don't want my Android, WP7 or iOS look and function exactly the same as other OS, I want uniqueness.

I guess you are the one not reading the article? Read it again, they are not going WP7 only

XIII said,

Dude, why don't you crawl out of your rock and read the damn articles? Nokia goes full WP7 while other phone makers do have Android handsets to backup sales as well. If WP7 goes down, Nokia will go along with it. Nokia made a dangerous gamble this time by not going multiplatform or at least keep the Symbian alive.

They aren't?
Update: Nokia have now confirmed the company's Symbian software will become a "franchise platform", with MeeGo soon to be open sourced with an emphasis placed on "longer-term market exploration of next generation devices, platforms and user experiences." Nokia says they will still ship a MeeGo device later this year despite today's news.
Nokia: Symbian and MeeGo not dead, still shipping this year

Guess you should read the article and research it yourself before talking out your ass.

Also the market will lack competitors, what will that lead ? Major competitors like iOS, Android, WP7 copy each others and no innovation can flourish... Before you post something else, please stop and think for a moment if what I said is true before you post. I don't want my Android, WP7 or iOS look and function exactly the same as other OS, I want uniqueness.

How will the market lack competitors if Microsoft gets another OEM to ship WP7? Android still exists. iOS still exists. And neither of them are going away anytime soon.

Don't even try to pretend you care about WP7 being innovative or not, you just spent the past day talking about how WP7 will die and blah blah blah.

Maybe you should take your own advice and except change a few things. "Stop and think about how not to troll"

XerXis said,

I guess you are the one not reading the article? Read it again, they are not going WP7 only


Let's read the article again, shall we ?

As part of the partnership, Nokia will make Windows Phone 7 their "principal smartphone strategy" (in other words, it's going to be their main operating system for all their phones) with plans to work in partnership with Microsoft on both software and hardware features, focusing first amongst other things on the Windows Phone 7's imaging capabilities. They'll also collaborate with Microsoft on marketing and the Windows Phone 7 roadmap, while assisting with hardware design and language support.

The keyword here is "principal." That means that development for Symbian will be much less than before. With this decision, Symbian is no longer one of the key players in the mobile OS and can be considered dead.

The keyword here is "principal." That means that development for Symbian will be much less than before. With this decision, Symbian is no longer one of the key players in the mobile OS and can be considered dead.

Not likely. Since like I mentioned in my forum post Nokia doesn't only make high end smartphones. WP7 requires what is considered a high end device.

Nokia still makes tons and tons of tons of low end devices that will still run symbian or meego and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Not everyone in the world can afford a $600 phone, and it would be quite stupid of Nokia to abandon their biggest market and go high end smartphones only.

Common sense 1. Troll 0.

/- Razorfold said,
Whoa, companies can never have failed products right? Obviously not in your fantasy troll world.

He's a macfan.

XIII said,

Dude, why don't you crawl out of your rock and read the damn articles? Nokia goes full WP7 while other phone makers do have Android handsets to backup sales as well. If WP7 goes down, Nokia will go along with it. Nokia made a dangerous gamble this time by not going multiplatform or at least keep the Symbian alive.
Also the market will lack competitors, what will that lead ? Major competitors like iOS, Android, WP7 copy each others and no innovation can flourish... Before you post something else, please stop and think for a moment if what I said is true before you post. I don't want my Android, WP7 or iOS look and function exactly the same as other OS, I want uniqueness.

1) Not going full WP7.
2) They still have their phone and smartphone OSes to fall back on.
3) Going Android would be as much cost and work to shove out their own OSes, so why waste their time with someone else's platform when devoting this level of resources?

Right now, WP7 has a better longevity outlook than Android because of the massive ongoing costs to keep Android bug fixes and updates applied to devices. Go read what Samsung and others have said about the horrid costs of Android in comparison to WP7.

Try to imagine it like this... (Insert Wayne's World dream sound effects.)

Think of the Phone world as the computer world in 1990.

First you had Mac with a simple feature set and hardware set making it easy but was only available from Apple, limited hardware features and limited functionality outside the rules of Apple.
(aka iPhone).

Next you have DOS and lots of UNIX variants running around. With UNIX you had a lot of development costs to port to your hardware, create the limited drivers and then add in the versioning and variant fragmentation that made it too EXPENSIVE to be offered as a viable desktop OS. Both UNIX and DOS lacked any upper level OS functionality, which shoved new basic OS functions on the backs of Applications, creating application inconsistency and development nightmares for any production level software. -Which are sadly some of the same problems you see with Linux as a desktop OS today.
(aka Android)

Next you have a new spin on what an OS should provide and the responsibility of the OS software to the company that makes it, and you have Windows 3.x that offered a simple OS environment that offered hardware independence, upper layer OS features that created a consistent development platform, with Microsoft taking all the work and responsibility out of the hands of OEMs and also Application developers by providing these new core OS features that were relegated to the Application layer in old models like UNIX and DOS.
(aka WP7)

This is fairly hyperbolic, as WP7 probably won't do as well as Win 3.x did no matter what, as Apple and other companies have learned why Win 3.x was successful, but it seems Google hasn't yet got this down.

Google is almost in slow motion standing by and letting Android choke itself with a sub par VM technology, shoving OS features to Applications, version/update issues that have even made Motorola flinch, and exponetial MFR cost issues that are very close to how UNIX almost disappeared from the desktop 20 years ago.

Google needs a good slap in the face to wake up, or Android will be the 'cheap crap, and maybe it will work' public perception relegated to specific niches like UNIX in 1990, and it will be Apple and Microsoft once again, and possibly Microsoft beating Apple at their game, as Windows did with regard to GUI functionality and performance in the 1990s.

XIII said,

Does Kin ring any bell ? Enough said.

Kin and Windows Phone 7 are not the same things. I'm sure you don't know the difference between Featured phone and smartphone.

XIII said,

Does Kin ring any bell ? Enough said.

mann .. thats months old.. get over it..
no one brings up the macintosh portable and how big of a fail that was anymore.

xMetian said,
Sounds good. Perhaps Nokia can get back on track, looking forward for the new phones

Yeah. Nokia W70 , Can you remember Nokia N70 days? Nokia is surely going to get back those days.

Mike Brown said,
Excellent. I'm looking forward to seeing how this pans out.

Me too. This is should benefit everyone with Nokia helping to improve WP7 as well.

This should be great for WP7 market share to rise. Especially in India, where people believe Nokia is the only company that can provide quality.

Navan said,
This should be great for WP7 market share to rise. Especially in India, where people believe Nokia is the only company that can provide quality.

yeah, but cheap Androids zte bade, videocons etc are all the rage now

guru said,

yeah, but cheap Androids zte bade, videocons etc are all the rage now

Nah man, those products are no where near quality. But yeah, for a quick and affordable taste of a smartphone OS, good choice.

Navan said,
This should be great for WP7 market share to rise. Especially in India, where people believe Nokia is the only company that can provide quality.

Yes, exactly. Same here in Bangladesh. I see everyone still uses Nokia. High-end Nokia N8 to Nokia 1200. I myself owned 7 Nokia devices. They really have outstanding quality. My Nokia N85 dropped from 20 feet height and it's still working nicely. I dropped a Nokia 1100 device in the pond and it's still working. You know it's true.

All signs led to this. I think it is a good step for Nokia, although I think they should have looked at Android instead. It have a much better market penetration.

x-byte said,
All signs led to this. I think it is a good step for Nokia, although I think they should have looked at Android instead. It have a much better market penetration.

What, even after Googles VP of engineering called both Nokia and Microsoft "Turkeys"?

neo158 said,

What, even after Googles VP of engineering called both Nokia and Microsoft "Turkeys"?

He was referring to the fact that Nokia (losing marketshare rapidly) and Windows Phone (in dead last) were probably not the best combination. Nokia globally has a staggering amount of phones out there but then they chose to go with an OS that seems to be lagging behind everyone but RIM. This statement was made via twitter, what was it, two days ago? I find it hard to believe that VP of engineering didn't know what was coming as you make it seem. He just was throwing a jab.

At the end of the day I truly wish them the best, this will probably be great for WP7. As for Nokia whose stock just took a dive, IDK only time will tell. But competition is always good I hope it will make the big three stronger platforms (iOS, Android, WP7) but as for RIM, I think they might be done.

x-byte said,
All signs led to this. I think it is a good step for Nokia, although I think they should have looked at Android instead. It have a much better market penetration.

Yes, better market penetration, but this also comes with drawbacks.

If they just went Android, they would be 'lost' in the sea of hardware, and people are already fairly clueless about Android phones with regard to hardware technology/features.

Also if they wanted to continue dumping money into the software side of their phones, with Android requires of MFRs, they would be better off sticking with their own OSes.

OS/Software development and long term support is not cheap, and this why Android is expensive to maintain for OEMs and carriers.

Just the initial release of Android on a device is expensive - build, drivers, optimiziations, workarounds, etc. (Especially if the company cares about the quality of the device.)

Then add in the bug fixes, version updates, and dealing with carriers to provide the updates is an ongoing and expensive process that many MFRs have publically said is far too expensive for even a short life cycle of a product (aka 2yrs.)

There are several MFRs that have already dropped updates and bug fixes for Android devices, and are treating them as fixed releases that will never be anything more than what the device was when it was purchased.

There are a lot of Android update promises that will never happen, and this includes big names as well as smaller companies that just don't have the money for ongoing development. (Think of how expensive it is for a hardware company to update drivers for computer peripherials, then imagine the cost of having to do this for a whole platform and every piece of hardware on the computer/device)

Even Motorola is stopping updates, and like many MFRs are leaving customers at very old versions, that create a framentation nightmare for Android and Google and developers and end users: http://androinica.com/2011/02/...eceive-new-android-updates/

The cost issue is one place WP7 is very attractive to MFRs as all the initial heavy lifting, driver support, and updates are handled by Microsoft.

Phone MFRs and carriers can finally treat their devices like a computer, meet the specifications and leave the rest up to Microsoft.
-(This same concept is what made Windows popular with OEMs intitially and why it is still popular with OEMs, and is why you don't see many OEMs seriously offer OSes that they end up being responsible for development, updates, and drivers, like Linux.)-


Nokia could have gone Android, but the cost and amount of work would not be much different than continuing their own OSes.

So by getting out of the software/OS side of development, and leaving it up to Microsoft as any WP7 OEM gets to do, they will save a lot of money and can put their resources into other areas like hardware design. It is a smart move for them.

Edited by thenetavenger, Feb 11 2011, 10:21am :

x-byte said,
All signs led to this. I think it is a good step for Nokia, although I think they should have looked at Android instead. It have a much better market penetration.

turkey riding a bicycle? not funny.

x-byte said,
All signs led to this. I think it is a good step for Nokia, although I think they should have looked at Android instead. It have a much better market penetration.

See, people would buy more Nokia N8 device if it would come with Windows Phone 7. It's the only way for Nokia to gain market share. Now come to the reality. In my country or in my neighborhood country (like India, Pakistan, Malaysia) of course many people buy Nokia high-end devices, they don't know anything about Android. But if Nokia advertise their phones with Windows Phone people will be more interested cause everybody knows Windows.

x-byte said,
All signs led to this. I think it is a good step for Nokia, although I think they should have looked at Android instead. It have a much better market penetration.

the android phone rush is over..

thenetavenger said,

Yes, better market penetration, but this also comes with drawbacks.

If they just went Android, they would be 'lost' in the sea of hardware, and people are already fairly clueless about Android phones with regard to hardware technology/features.

Also if they wanted to continue dumping money into the software side of their phones, with Android requires of MFRs, they would be better off sticking with their own OSes.

OS/Software development and long term support is not cheap, and this why Android is expensive to maintain for OEMs and carriers.

Just the initial release of Android on a device is expensive - build, drivers, optimiziations, workarounds, etc. (Especially if the company cares about the quality of the device.)

Then add in the bug fixes, version updates, and dealing with carriers to provide the updates is an ongoing and expensive process that many MFRs have publically said is far too expensive for even a short life cycle of a product (aka 2yrs.)

There are several MFRs that have already dropped updates and bug fixes for Android devices, and are treating them as fixed releases that will never be anything more than what the device was when it was purchased.

There are a lot of Android update promises that will never happen, and this includes big names as well as smaller companies that just don't have the money for ongoing development. (Think of how expensive it is for a hardware company to update drivers for computer peripherials, then imagine the cost of having to do this for a whole platform and every piece of hardware on the computer/device)

Even Motorola is stopping updates, and like many MFRs are leaving customers at very old versions, that create a framentation nightmare for Android and Google and developers and end users: http://androinica.com/2011/02/...eceive-new-android-updates/

The cost issue is one place WP7 is very attractive to MFRs as all the initial heavy lifting, driver support, and updates are handled by Microsoft.

Phone MFRs and carriers can finally treat their devices like a computer, meet the specifications and leave the rest up to Microsoft.
-(This same concept is what made Windows popular with OEMs intitially and why it is still popular with OEMs, and is why you don't see many OEMs seriously offer OSes that they end up being responsible for development, updates, and drivers, like Linux.)-


Nokia could have gone Android, but the cost and amount of work would not be much different than continuing their own OSes.

So by getting out of the software/OS side of development, and leaving it up to Microsoft as any WP7 OEM gets to do, they will save a lot of money and can put their resources into other areas like hardware design. It is a smart move for them.

+1. I think this was a great strategic partnership for both Microsoft and Nokia honestly.

Clik said,
RIP Symbian.

More like DIAF. >_> Seriously though, Symbian has no real hope against iOS and Android. It's better for Nokia to embrace a modern platform that's readily available.

Interesting. I wonder how this will affect the market share...not that it makes any difference to me personally, but it'll be interesting to see nonetheless.

Intrinsica said,
Interesting. I wonder how this will affect the market share...not that it makes any difference to me personally, but it'll be interesting to see nonetheless.

Nokia is the most popular mobile maker in the world. In my country almost everyone uses Nokia.

Faisal Islam said,

Nokia is the most popular mobile maker in the world. In my country almost everyone uses Nokia.

yeah but how many of those Nokia phones used in your country can run WP7 ?

LaP said,

yeah but how many of those Nokia phones used in your country can run WP7 ?

Exactly. The only truly global software/service I know of from MS is Windows and possibly Office. Most Live services have restrictions and I'm not even sure how much of the world still doesn't have the Zune. I think this move is purely American.

LaP said,

yeah but how many of those Nokia phones used in your country can run WP7 ?

I don't know how much phones Nokia released with WP7. Do you? hahhahahahahahhahahahahaha

Anyway I think a $500 phones can run WP7. That's the point. Of course people in my country or in India will not buy Samsung Galaxy if they see Nokia N Serise or XpressMusic or E Serise whatever with WP7.
Man I live here, trust me, many people in India and Bangladesh use 'Ovi Mail' as their primary Email address. I don't why but Nokia has a very good position is South Asia.

LaP said,

yeah but how many of those Nokia phones used in your country can run WP7 ?

I'm sure it will result on a Liter version of the OS...

wctaiwan said,
Nice. Good luck to Nokia. Hopefully this will save Nokia and make Windows 7 a much more important contender.

I agree. This is really a great arrangement for both of them.