Jobs' Amazon account exposed, idiot wants to sell details

When you're a celebrity or a high profile citizen, it's not uncommon to be targeted by selfish individuals looking to make a dollar at your expense. It's possible that Steve Jobs has fallen victim to a phishing scam that may have given access to his Amazon account.

CultofMac.com is reporting that they have been contacted by a phishing artist who managed to get into Steve Jobs' Amazon account by claiming to have "sent Jobs a phony but official-looking email that tricked him into logging onto a fake Amazon.com website".

Like any greedy individual, the phishing artist wants to sell the details of what items Jobs has purchased, which he claims to be over 20,000 items over the last 10 years, or about 5 items a day.

The phishing artist goes by the name of orin0co, and claims neither Jobs nor Amazon knew of the intrusion because he didn't change the password on the account. The phishing attack was a well-crafted email that "instead of spamming millions with scattershot email scams, ...targeted high-worth corporate executives with cleverly-crafted emails full of personal details. The executives received messages that appeared to come from the Better Business Bureau, Internal Revenue Service, or Federal Trade Commission, among others."

Even if this turns out to be a hoax, it's a good reminder to keep strong and secure passwords. Use a variation of numbers, letters and symbols when possible and don't keep the same password for every site.

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This piece of rubbish must be the biggest load of bunk I've ever seen posted on Neowin! It should be removed as a matter of urgency!

Yeah Jobs was hacked, but he quickly drawed his iFon and patched all the holes from his home.

1) A vulnerability in Apache when handling FTP proxy requests can be exploited by malicious people to conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

For more information:
SA31384

2) A boundary error in the handling of Compact Font Format (CFF) fonts in Apple Type Services can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow when specially crafted document is downloaded or viewed.

Successful exploitation allows execution of arbitrary code.

3) A vulnerability in BIND can potentially be exploited by malicious people to conduct spoofing attacks.

For more information:
SA33404

4) An error in the parsing of Set-Cookie headers in CFNetwork can result in applications using CFNetwork sending sensitive information in unencrypted HTTP requests.

5) An error in CFNetwork when processing long HTTP headers can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow when visiting a malicious web site.

Successful exploitation allows execution of arbitrary code.

6) Multiple errors exist in the processing of PDF files in CoreGraphics, which can be exploited to corrupt memory and execute arbitrary code via a specially crafted PDF file.

7) An integer underflow error in the processing of PDF files in CoreGraphics can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow when specially crafted PDF files is opened.

Successful exploitation allows execution of arbitrary code.

8) Multiple vulnerabilities in the processing of JBIG2 streams within PDF files in CoreGraphics can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

For more information:
SA34291

9) Multiple vulnerabilities in cscope can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

For more information:
SA34978:

10) A boundary error in the handling of disk images can be exploited to cause a stack-based buffer overflow when a specially crafted disk image is mounted.

11) Multiple unspecified errors in the handling of disk images can be exploited to cause memory corruptions when a specially crafted disk image is mounted.

Successful exploitation of vulnerabilities #10 and #11 allows execution of arbitrary code.

12) Multiple vulnerabilities in enscript can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a vulnerable system.

For more information:
SA13968
SA32137

13) Multiple vulnerabilities in the Flash Player plugin can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

For more information:
SA34012

14) An error in Help Viewer when loading Cascading Style Sheets referenced in URL parameters can be exploited to invoke arbitrary AppleScript files.

15) A vulnerability exists due to Help Viewer not validating that full paths to HTML documents are within registered help books, which can be exploited to invoke arbitrary AppleScript files.

Successful exploitation of vulnerabilities #14 and #15 allows execution of arbitrary code.

16) An error in iChat can result in AIM communication configured for SSL to be sent in plaintext.

17) An error in the handling of certain character encodings in ICU can be exploited to bypass filters on websites that attempt to mitigate cross-site scripting.

18) Some vulnerabilities in IPSec can be exploited by malicious users and malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

For more information:
SA31450
SA31478

19) Multiple vulnerabilities in Kerberos can be exploited by malicious people to potentially disclose sensitive information, cause a DoS (Denial of Service), or potentially compromise a vulnerable system.

For more information:
SA34347

20) An error in the handling of workqueues within the kernel can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS or execute arbitrary code with Kernel privileges.

21) An error in Launch Services can cause Finder to repeatedly terminate and relaunch when a specially crafted Mach-O is downloaded.

22) A vulnerability in libxml can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service) or potentially compromise an application using the library.

For more information:
SA31558

23) A vulnerability in Net-SNMP can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

For more information:
SA32560

24) A vulnerability in Network Time can be exploited by malicious people to conduct spoofing attacks.

For more information:
SA33406

25) A vulnerability in Network Time can be exploited by malicious people to potentially compromise a user's system.

For more information:
SA34608

26) A vulnerability in Networking can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

For more information:
SA31745

27) A vulnerability in OpenSSL can be exploited by malicious people to conduct spoofing attacks.

For more information:
SA33338

28) Some vulnerabilities in PHP can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service) or potentially compromise a vulnerable system, and by malicious, local users to bypass certain security restrictions.

For more information:
SA32964

29) An unspecified error in QuickDraw Manager can be exploited to cause a memory corruption and potentially execute arbitrary code via a specially crafted PICT image.

30) An integer underflow error in the handling of "0x77" tags within PICT images in QuickDraw Manager can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow via a specially crafted PICT file.

Successful exploitation allows execution of arbitrary code.

31) Multiple vulnerabilities in ruby can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions, cause a DoS (Denial of Service), and conduct spoofing attacks.

For more information:
SA31430
SA31602

32) An error in the use of the OpenSSL library in ruby can cause revoked certificates to be accepted.

33) A vulnerability in Safari when handling "feed:" URLs can be exploited to compromise a user's system.

For more information:
SA35056

34) Multiple unspecified errors in Spotlight can be exploited to cause memory corruptions and execute arbitrary code when a specially crafted Office document is downloaded.

35) An error when invoking the "login" command can result in unexpected high privileges.

36) A boundary error in telnet can be exploited to cause a stack-based buffer overflow when connecting to a server with an overly long canonical name in its DNS address record.

Successful exploitation may allow execution of arbitrary code.

37) A vulnerability in WebKit when handling SVGList objects can be exploited to corrupt memory and potentially execute arbitrary code.

For more information:
SA35056

38) Multiple vulnerabilities in FreeType can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service) and potentially compromise applications using the library.

For more information:
SA20100
SA25350
SA34723

39) A vulnerability in xterm can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

For more information:
SA33318

40) Multiple vulnerabilities in libpng can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service) or to potentially compromise an application using the library.

For more information:
SA29792
SA33970

If I was Steve Jobs and this was true, I would just publish everything I bought on the web for free. Then the scam hacker guy wouldn't be able to sell anything.

I am suprised no one commented yet on SJ buying Blu-Ray how about "The future is in HD itunes downloads" or the "You know, Blu-ray is a bag of hurt. I don't mean from a consumer point of view—it's great to watch movies—but the licensing is so complex.

I guess it wasn't too complex for him to figure it out

Every amazon member knows amazon do not send you emails asking you to login via your email inbox.

Give Forrest back his company he would not fall for that!

I dont get people now a days...why in the world would you click ANYTHING in ANY email system that has to do with "account" stuff. NEVER EEEEVVVERRR do I do that, I delete it (if it "looks" like it "might" be important I will READ it, but NOT click ANY links in it.).

If Amazon/paypal/eBay/etc. said to me in an email (like most phishing scams do) you have to log onto your account to update some new security questions, click here:, I would delete THEN GO TO AMAZON.COM MYSELF, typing it in or my OWN bookmark, and logging in to check. Why people believe convenience is ok to be lazy and get screwed I have no clue. Just dumb and ignorant if you ask me.

That beats ANY issue about "oh safari is terrible, IE is terrible, should have used outlook, etc."...actually its the email 'provider' that needs to warn you [if IT knows about it that is], they 'are' the ones handling it first...duh.

Now earlier comments made a good point earlier, its probably fake anyway, and as well, who cares its not like its his bank account details that are up for grabs...

Don't get the point of this line:

Even if this turns out to be a hoax, it's a good reminder to keep strong and secure passwords. Use a variation of numbers, letters and symbols when possible

What good is a strong password if you're dumb enough to get phished?

Athernar said,
Don't get the point of this line:


What good is a strong password if you're dumb enough to get phished?


Amateur articles at their finest.

Let's set a few things straight here before anyone else blames OS X or Safari or Mail.

Phishing filters should not be a requirement. Simple as that. Someone as educated in the tech industry as Steve Jobs knows when they are being targeted. They know the signs to look for. They know to check for security certificates, and valid ones at that, for big sites like Amazon. So I am 100% sure that this is fake.

Regardless, say he was an everyday Joe. Safari has anti-phishing built in. Mail has pretty good spam/phishing detection. And the OS simply has nothing to do with it.

The way a phishing filter works is through past experience. If a phishing site is discovered, it is added to a large list of other sites. Same way a virus works: different routine to create it, different routine to remove it. You can't just say "he should've used a different browser" because a site wasn't yet added to the filter. If an attack is aimed specifically at one person, an idea not too far out of the question, a phishing filter will not detect it. Even if it's detected as spam, some people may click through.

But we have to go back to the first point and be rational about this. We're talking about a billionaire who made it through the tech industry. Not just a businessman, but a businessman who sold computers through the birth of the Internet. He knows what a phishing attack is as well as anyone on this site, and I doubt any of us would blindly put our password into a site linked to us in a e-mail.

"At the time this scam occurred, Jobs was on a PC with IE8, his friend's computer, while checking his email. Jobs stated that, 'I only went on the PC for a couple minutes and look what happened! I really had no other choice.'

If he had been on a Mac using Safari, this would have never happened."

:D *this is a joke* I almost always think that I need a legal disclaimer at the bottom of any of my sarcastic posts.

Oh, thus why you should've included the disclaimer. I dunno, you should've seen the responses to my other post about macs.

Solid Knight said,
...Phishing scams are platform independent so the joke doesn't really work.

They are? Most of the Mac people would disagree with you.

I see no evidence this is really his account, he's not the only Steve Jobs in the world my bets are on this is fake.

Oh please. It's not hard to register on Amazon as "Steve Jobs" so chances are it is fake.

And if it happens to be genuine, the idiot isn't the person selling the data. The true idiot is the person who thinks it is money well spent. So Steve bought some stuff on Amazon, how does that impact anyone's life? Get a grip.

C_Guy said,
Oh please. It's not hard to register on Amazon as "Steve Jobs" so chances are it is fake.

And if it happens to be genuine, the idiot isn't the person selling the data. The true idiot is the person who thinks it is money well spent. So Steve bought some stuff on Amazon, how does that impact anyone's life? Get a grip.


For once I agree. I couldn't care less what famous people have purchased... how will this benefit anyone in any way?

C_Guy said,
Oh please. It's not hard to register on Amazon as "Steve Jobs" so chances are it is fake.

And if it happens to be genuine, the idiot isn't the person selling the data. The true idiot is the person who thinks it is money well spent. So Steve bought some stuff on Amazon, how does that impact anyone's life? Get a grip.

I also agree with you for once, but highly doubt this is genuine.

orin0co should at least learn to use paint text before he/she claims to be able to effectively phish - this looks more like some fun a 5 year old had at the weekend.

i bet steve jobs used his crappy safari which claims to be very good but it turns out it is worse than IE,perhaps steve jobs should use firefox or opera instead of that piece of garbage safari. if and when steve jobs dies he should tell apple to let go of all there restrictions of all and donate all his money to charity or to the poor.

Um Safari is worse than IE. That's my personal oppinion. There's no better or worse really, just oppinions. Vanilla ice-cream's better than chocolate, well no, chocholate's better!! It'll never be decided, but what we do know is that if Jobs was using IE8 and MS Outlook, this would have been a lot more unlikely to happen.

And Microsoft is a better company because they donate so much. That's just very kind of them, so stop calling them M$.

It's all about what you want in a browser. If IE or Safari works for you, then stick with it. Even Firefox or Opera.

However, in this case, it's a moot point. Safari has the same phishing protection as Firefox. You can only detect a phishing attack if it's been discovered before, and I doubt someone would target Jobs with a mass mailing.

Additionally, it's probably a fake. It's easy enough to say "Look who I hacked!". It's another to actually prove that the account belongs to them.

hotdog963al said,
Shows how much you know. To say Safari is "worse" than IE, is completely and utterly ignorant. Read up on WebKit.

Exactly.

dagrimdialer619 said,
Exactly.

The browser in question is not "Webkit" it's Safari. And it is BAD. Why would any browser let sites to palce executible files on your desktop without your consent? (non-issue for Apple)

Julius Caro said,
I know right? Unprofessional doesnt have to mean low-class

Agreed. Keep personal opinions.. well.. personal.

I was given a warning for posting a link to the old "you are an idiot" flash site in response to a specific post by another member. Why should I get a warning when a news poster is allowed to call someone else an idiot directly in the title of a main news post? Mods, either remove that warn on my account, or fix the title here. You can't have it both ways.

Also if you are going to call someone an idiot I wouldn't pick the scam artist for that... I would call the one who fell for it an idiot....

Article edited to fix some spelling and grammar issues. And cheers bmdixon, was just editing your post to do the same

How is a phishing case a reminder to keep a strong and secure password? It doesn't matter if it's 3 paragraphs long and contains each symbol in the unicode alphabet at least twice.

Wow relax... That read like the author felt like someone has stolen his mom's bank account number. I'm sure Jobs fixed his account information and it realy isn't that big of a deal.

I for one don't really feel sorry for Jobs if it is his account. He shouldn't fall victim to that stuff, but I guess he took those Mac Vs PC ads a bit too seriously...

I don't normally post criticism regarding the news on this site, but I wonder what the author was thinking when he chose to add 'idiot' to the title. The guy may not be morally or legally sound in his decision to phish, but plenty of people make their living selling personal details about celebrities. A sad fact of life, but that doesn't make the guy an 'idiot'...

[< snipped > - Calum]

Yea, this orin0co guy isn't an idiot. He finally has helped prove that Mac's do have worries and security problems just like PC's! Maybe Apple fill finally stop lying in their commercials, it's making me really upset (My first word choice was censored, lol).

andrewbares said,
Yea, this orin0co guy isn't an idiot. He finally has helped prove that Mac's do have worries and security problems just like PC's! Maybe Apple fill finally stop lying in their commercials, it's making me really upset (My first word choice was censored, lol).

See my above post 1.6

If you think that a weak password, or falling for social engineering has anything to do with how secure the OS is, then I pray you don't work with computers.

markjensen said,
See my above post 1.6

If you think that a weak password, or falling for social engineering has anything to do with how secure the OS is, then I pray you don't work with computers.

What "post 1.6"?

And do you really think that anyone who hacks anything Apple related is an "idiot"? Where did all the moderational zeal on the "calling other people names" go?

Haha, I don't recall anyone calling the ones who hack random celebrity accounts "idiots" and "selfish", but when it comes to the god that is Steve Jobs.. Oh my. :rolleyes:

BTW, Neowin + Firefox =

"Idiot" seems halfway appropriate, but scumbag, jackass, loser, or douchebag might be even more appropriate. What a stupid thing to do, and then try to sell! What kind of lifeless fool would even care what the CEO of a company purchases at Amazon?

RealFduch said,

What "post 1.6"?

And do you really think that anyone who hacks anything Apple related is an "idiot"? Where did all the moderational zeal on the "calling other people names" go?


Sorry. 2.6 Way to get pedantic on the typo. :rolleyes:

And what the heck are you dragging me into a discussion point I did not make or support with regards to the term "idiot". Firstly, I never claimed anyone hacking an Apple is an idiot. Secondly, an Apple wasn't hacked - just an online account credential.

Save your scorn for someone else, rather than throwing it around at random.

Oh dear. If this is true, then Jobs will be on a screaming bloody rampage for this person's head.
Brb going to grab pitchfork for the witch hunt.

or Firefox... is ok too. Or get a pc then run linux if he hates windows so much. There are many choices. If he used M$ outlook, this would not happen.

Or Safari 4... or Safari on the iPhone 3.0. Phishing filters aren't anything special, although Apple was slow to add it to their browsers. I have no doubt Jobs is on Apple's beta software.

simon360 said,
Or Safari 4... or Safari on the iPhone 3.0. Phishing filters aren't anything special, although Apple was slow to add it to their browsers. I have no doubt Jobs is on Apple's beta software.

Which apparently works just swell, eh?

LOL. MS Outlook would have protected him so well, along with IE8.

But I guess this blows the whole, Mac's are 100% secure and don't have any worries commercial out of the water. Good job, orin0co!

If someone does something stupid, they do something stupid. Additionally, this was probably aimed specifically at Jobs. No phishing filter can detect a new site, it's always based on threats already discovered.

andrewbares said,
LOL. MS Outlook would have protected him so well, along with IE8.

But I guess this blows the whole, Mac's are 100% secure and don't have any worries commercial out of the water. Good job, orin0co!


What does having a weak password, or replying to a phishing email have to do with your OS security?

Let me answer for that for you, since you seem to miss the linkage.

There is no link. No corresponding statistic. No connection.

markjensen said,

What does having a weak password, or replying to a phishing email have to do with your OS security?

Let me answer for that for you, since you seem to miss the linkage.

There is no link. No corresponding statistic. No connection.



Because Outlook and/or IE8 would've warned him that it's a phishing site or phishing e-mail. Mac's don't do that hence the great Steve Jobs is tricked into giving up his personal details.

That's the link.