Judge kills Winklevoss settlement appeal against Facebook

The long, infamous litigation between Facebook and the Winklevoss twins seems to have screeched to a halt, if a federal appeals court judge has anything to say about it.

Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss, along with fellow Hardvard peer Divya Narendra, entered in a lawsuit against Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, for allegedly stealing their idea for a social network website and using their coding to do so. Facebook then countersued the three and their site ConnectU, claiming they had hacked into Facebook to spam users with stolen data.

All four finally reached a settlement in 2008 for $65 million. But later, the Winklevoss twins and Narendra decided to pull out, stating that Facebook misrepresented the value of its stock. A judge ruled against the three, but they decided to fight it. All of which was later dramatically retold in the Academy Award winning The Social Network.

Monday morning, Chief Judge for the Ninth District of San Francisco Alex Kozinski ruled in favor of the previous court decision. And he had no problems voicing his intent to have the litigation die.

"The courts might have obliged, had the Winklevosses not settled the dispute and signed a release of all claims against Facebook," Kozinski wrote via CNET. "We see no basis for allowing them to [back out]. [...] At some point, litigation must come to an end. That point has now been reached.""

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19 Comments

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jingarelho said,
if you improved the chair would you pay to the guy who made the first one?

No but if the inventor of the chair hired you to help him design the chair then you stole the idea of the chair and improved it and made billions im sure the original inventor would have something to say about it.

Yeah, if you are really the original idea and coder of FaceBook, I am sure with 65mil or cash in hand, you can certainly think of a another great idea, may be something bigger than anything ..

Really should have taken the 65mil and should have concentrated on creativity !!!

Actually it's $20 million in cash, and what was at the time of settlement $45 million in Facebook shares. Today those shares are worth about four times as much.

I'd have taken the 65 mil and been happy split three ways that still make you filthy rich with 21.66 mil each what a bunch of drongo's

Athlonite said,
I'd have taken the 65 mil and been happy split three ways that still make you filthy rich with 21.66 mil each what a bunch of drongo's

+1

too much greed these days

Typical Harvard business students. Whenever someone like Mark Zuckerberg comes up with a great idea and they happen to be his helper-monkeys, they believe that they should get some bananas too.

I hope they leave this guy alone for good.

PlogCF said,
Typical Harvard business students. Whenever someone like Mark Zuckerberg comes up with a great idea and they happen to be his helper-monkeys, they believe that they should get some bananas too.

I hope they leave this guy alone for good.

Actually if the movie is accurate to the gist of the facts, you have it backwards. THEY came up with the germ of the idea, and Zuckerberg was the helper-monkey. However, he did come up with several improvements on the basic concept.

krasch said,

Actually if the movie is accurate to the gist of the facts, you have it backwards. THEY came up with the germ of the idea, and Zuckerberg was the helper-monkey. However, he did come up with several improvements on the basic concept.

The movie is not accurate. It is based on Ben Mezrich's "The Accidental Billionaires". Mezrich says that his book is based on court documents but the plot lines are just that. No one was ever interviewed for the book so the plot was mainly his fabrication.