Kantar: Windows Phone, Android see massive growth at expense of iOS, Blackberry

We’ve already heard that Nokia and Samsung had disappointing fourth quarters, and Apple’s iPhone has been slowly losing market share throughout 2013. So many may be wondering if anyone’s actually winning the smartphone wars since everyone seems to be losing.

Now the latest report from Kantar Worldpanel gives us a clearer picture who is gaining market share and which markets are the most volatile. Kantar’s data is based on the previous three months, ending in December 2013.

First up, checking the tables below, we can easily see that Android has had another phenomenal year, with increased marketshare around the world. In the U.S., Google’s OS managed to increase its presence and is now sitting just shy of 51%. China and Europe have also seen greater adoption of the OS, which is sitting comfortably at 78% and 68%, respectively. However the biggest change occurred in Latin America, where Android saw a 21 percent increase year over year, and it now pretty much owns the market with an 83% adoption rate.

Despite all this, Samsung has had disappointing results lately, mainly due to increased pressure from local manufacturers in China, and more competition in the low-end market from players such as Nokia.

Speaking of Nokia, which practically owns the Windows Phone market, it too has had a good year in terms of adoption. Windows Phone has seen growth almost across the board. The biggest change is in Europe, where Microsoft’s platform has held double digit figures for the last three months of 2013. That’s almost double compared to last year’s results, when Windows Phone only accounted for 5.6% market share. Other markets have also seen growth, but Windows Phone is still very anaemic when it comes to the U.S. and China.

Finally, the year’s biggest market share losers are Blackberry, which is clinically dead, and more surprisingly Apple. The Cupertino company has seen decreases in pretty much every market. Even in the U.S., where it holds the most sway, iOS has seen a 5.8% decrease with most of those users moving to Android. Another big drop was seen in Europe where Apple’s products lost another 5.2% compared to 2012 and are now sitting at 18.5% marketshare.

Already we know Samsung is going on the offensive with the new Galaxy S5 being supposedly launched in the next couple of months, and there are a ton of rumors as to Apple’s upcoming plans. And let’s not forget Microsoft, which now owns Nokia’s smartphone business. All in all, 2014 is shaping up to be a very interesting year in terms of the smartphone race.

Source: Kantar Worldpanel via Engadget | Image via Kantar Worldpanel

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But I was told right here on NeoWin by totally neutral members a while ago that WP is only growing a little bit because Blackberry is dying and that that will stop very soon. So these numbers can't be right, I demand a recount!

I just find it interesting that apparently you can walk around Italy and see more Windows Phones than iPhones.

I've said it before, the main weakness of Windows Phone is the lack of apps. The performance and experience (to me) is superior to the competition on my Lumia 929 (recently upgraded from a HTC HD-7)...but all I see in advertisements for apps is "available for iPhone/available for Android".

Aren't over 50% of Apples profits and revenue tied to the iPhone? Continually shrinking numbers like this don't bode well. Especially with iPad sales declining and Mac market share and sales stagnate and shrinking.

Wapoz said,
Aren't over 50% of Apples profits and revenue tied to the iPhone? Continually shrinking numbers like this don't bode well. Especially with iPad sales declining and Mac market share and sales stagnate and shrinking.

Some of us have been mentioning this for a few years. The instant Apple loses it's "coolness" badge amongst teenagers and the hipster crowd it'll be game over. That moment doesn't look like it's far off. When you have the best product you can charge a premium and get away with it. Apple hasn't had that product since about the 3GS/4 era.

I had reason to be at a competition this weekend for the Business Schools of over a dozen Universities from across central and eastern Canada. Close to a 1,000 students, staff and volunteers. There were a number of big name sponsors like Pepsi and Target but front and centre Microsoft had a really nice area set up showing off some phones, Surfaces and even some stuff from Dell to push Windows 8. I believe they also had an Xbox One on the go too. In Canada, Windows Phone 8 and the Surface line are pretty tiny market share compared to the iPad/iPhone and android but when the MS people actually had the time to demonstrate the capabilities and features you could tell people were very interested. They weren't "selling" anything - simply giving people a chance to use the devices. The impression seemed to be that a lot of people had simply never looked at Microsofts products but when they were shown, in depth, what could be done, there was a clear feeling that the stuff being produced had actual use and utility rather than simply being flashy looking and being good for playing games on.

ExplodingKnees said,

Some of us have been mentioning this for a few years. The instant Apple loses it's "coolness" badge amongst teenagers and the hipster crowd it'll be game over. That moment doesn't look like it's far off. When you have the best product you can charge a premium and get away with it. Apple hasn't had that product since about the 3GS/4 era.

People have been saying this for years and it's still not happened. The latest iToy sold better than ever as far as i'm aware. The next one may likely do the same. I'd love for Apple to become irrelevant like they deserve, but sadly it might not happen. Even if Apples market share continues to fall, they can still continuously sell more and more iPhones each year.

I had a conversation with a co-worker who carries both a iPhone 4s and Galaxy. He used to be hardcore iOS and then switched part because of the iPhone's tiny screen. And the slightly bigger screen on the iPhone 5 wasn't appealing to him either so he got a Galaxy (but keeps the iPhone for a handful of apps that aren't on Android).

I wonder if that's the case with a lot of people; they can't stand the iPhone's smaller screen. Phablets have been selling well and Apple has nothing to compete in regards to screen real estate. Perhaps that's why we keep hearing so many rumors of a 5" iPhone coming this year.

Before getting a Galaxy S3, I was an avid iPhone user (had a 3G, 3GS, 4 and 4S). The reason I switched? Somewhere between the 4S and the 5, I felt iOS wasn't evolving anymore (no new killer features, lack of functionalities and choice versus Android, etc.). Sure, iOS 7 came out and looks different, but I still feel iOS is stuck somewhere in 2010. Screen size wasn't a factor for me (in fact, I preferred form factor of my 4S, even if my S3 is a superior phone). I simply got bored with iOS and its lack of choice/personalization.

With Android, I feel I can use my phone the way I want to (different ROMs, different launchers, icon packs, themes, possibility to chose default apps, etc.). With iOS, it felt like I had to use my phone the way Apple wanted me to. I didn't want that crap anymore.

Figure 8 Dash said,
I had a conversation with a co-worker who carries both a iPhone 4s and Galaxy. He used to be hardcore iOS and then switched part because of the iPhone's tiny screen. And the slightly bigger screen on the iPhone 5 wasn't appealing to him either so he got a Galaxy (but keeps the iPhone for a handful of apps that aren't on Android).

I wonder if that's the case with a lot of people; they can't stand the iPhone's smaller screen. Phablets have been selling well and Apple has nothing to compete in regards to screen real estate. Perhaps that's why we keep hearing so many rumors of a 5" iPhone coming this year.

Edited by myxomatosis, Jan 27 2014, 2:28pm :

By the way, you can now get a killer phone (Nexus 5) for a fraction of the price of an iPhone 5S. Apple needs to address this. $700+ for an iPhone without contract is a joke.

Stokkolm said,
I've made my contribution to Windows Phone and Nokia in the US by switching from iPhone to a Lumia 1520.

1520 is a very good phone/phablet. as for me I am waiting for a 5 inches lumia with same specs. I own 920 by the way for now. I also have a feeling they are going to change the look and feel of WP dramatically so I wait for now.

Indeed. I have a 920 as well and although I am not locked in a carrier contract, I always and only buy unbranded devices, I will wait to see what 8.1 will bring both as software and hardware.

I do find it to be slightly too big sometimes, but overall I can't complain. It is hard to do everything with one hand though.

I would hope that if anything drastic did happen that the 1520 would be upgraded on the software side. It is the top of the line WP right now, so hopefully anything they're designing will work seamlessly. If not, I changed my plan to AT&T Next, so I can upgrade in 18 months, which isn't too long of a wait.

The cost of an iPhone used to be worth it. but there are lots of manufacturers now selling very good smartphones at a very reasonable price. There aren't many people willing to spend 5x the cost of a cheap Android phone to get an iPhone.

Justin Luna said,
Windows Phone still has a lot of work to do. But this is already something!

I doubt it can grow much more on Nokia alone. Just look at the speed at which Apple is shrinking. One brand/style isn't able to hold people's interest forever. I bet if we were to split this pie into OEMS then we'd see a lot of smaller players and two big players shrinking. So as much as I like the Lumia designs and colors, Windows Phone needs more diversity to stay competitive.

If another OEM would go all-in and use its channels to promote WP then we will see an additional 50% increase. That or Microsoft's own Surface Phone. I think a serious-looking device like that could be a real hit among business users.

Ronnet said,

I doubt it can grow much more on Nokia alone. Just look at the speed at which Apple is shrinking. One brand/style isn't able to hold people's interest forever. I bet if we were to split this pie into OEMS then we'd see a lot of smaller players and two big players shrinking. So as much as I like the Lumia designs and colors, Windows Phone needs more diversity to stay competitive.

If another OEM would go all-in and use its channels to promote WP then we will see an additional 50% increase. That or Microsoft's own Surface Phone. I think a serious-looking device like that could be a real hit among business users.

Though I don't know how big a difference the "Surface Phone" would be from the Nokia line considering Microsoft now owns Nokia's Devices Devision, I think something a bit more business minded would be a good addition to the line. Keep in mind though that many businesses have been forced to wait for the upcoming Enterprise Pack that appears to be taking forevor... Once Microsoft starts taking the business market seriously, we should see some increased market share in that segment.

With regards to Android, I completely agree with you, and as all of these OEM's squable, I expect the OS to become less attractive to them.

I'm not expecting Microsoft to release a Surface Phone until WP8.1 (which is expected to include more Enterprise support). But I dont see the problem with Microsoft owning both Lumia and Surface devices.

Lumia has a very colorful, rounded, natural vibe in their design. Nothing at all like the Surface tablet line. Which is more about straight lines and corners. It has a more proffesional appearance. Which has its own charm to it.

This also plays in the need for diversity. I own a Lumia 920 but for my next Phone I would prefer a Surface-like Phone. I happen to be a WP fan so I wouldn't switch to Android no matter what. But I can understand someone coming from a Lumia device and wanting to go for a different looking Android just to switch things up. So it makes sense for MS to offer a like of different looking devices to keep customers on WP.

Ronnet said,

I doubt it can grow much more on Nokia alone. Just look at the speed at which Apple is shrinking. One brand/style isn't able to hold people's interest forever.

It isn't just Nokia though. In fact, my cell network here doesn't even have Nokia windows phones. Only Huawei and HTC.

ExplodingKnees said,

It isn't just Nokia though. In fact, my cell network here doesn't even have Nokia windows phones. Only Huawei and HTC.

Do they do enough to promote WP? Or are they stacked in the back behind rows of Androids?

I ask this because Nokia has 90% WP marketshare. So basically all growth comes from Nokia alone at the moment. And Nokia's WP marketshare has been on the rise the last year. So WP's growth is thanks to Nokia and not HTC and the others.

Ronnet said,

Do they do enough to promote WP? Or are they stacked in the back behind rows of Androids?

I ask this because Nokia has 90% WP marketshare. So basically all growth comes from Nokia alone at the moment. And Nokia's WP marketshare has been on the rise the last year. So WP's growth is thanks to Nokia and not HTC and the others.

Pretty much even footing. My network doesn't have dozens of handsets. Usually a few of each kind and some "feature phones" for those who aren't interested in a smart phone.

Ronnet said,

I doubt it can grow much more on Nokia alone. Just look at the speed at which Apple is shrinking. One brand/style isn't able to hold people's interest forever. I bet if we were to split this pie into OEMS then we'd see a lot of smaller players and two big players shrinking. So as much as I like the Lumia designs and colors, Windows Phone needs more diversity to stay competitive.

If another OEM would go all-in and use its channels to promote WP then we will see an additional 50% increase. That or Microsoft's own Surface Phone. I think a serious-looking device like that could be a real hit among business users.


Dont forget Apple on releases one product per year while Nokia(MS) releases many devices even some in niche markets. That's the major differences between Apples decline and Nokia.

I wonder how many Android OEMs are now behind Nokia in terms of marketshare.

Android looks huge in these comparisons but that growing piece of the pie is also being shared by more and more OEMs these days.