Kim Dotcom reveals details of MegaUpload successor Mega

2012 hasn't exactly been the best year for Kim Dotcom.  MegaUpload, the popular file sharing website he helped to create, was shut down by the US government in January. It also executed a raid of his home in New Zealand at the same time. Dotcom was briefly put in jail, along with other MegaUpload team members, and he and his legal team have been fighting in court and awaiting a possible extradition to the US to face online piracy charges ever since.

In the midst of all this, Dotcom has been hinting for months that he will relaunch a successor to MegaUpload. Today, the first concrete details of this new service were revealed in an article for Wired, which will be called simply Mega.

Dotcom and his partners say that Mega will still allow users to upload and share files via a remote server. Unlike MegaUpload, users who upload files to Mega will be able to one-click encrypt any of them from within a web browser. After that is done, the user receives a unique key to decrypt that file.

The end result is no one but the person uploading the file to the server will have any way to know what that file's content will be like, including (in theory) the Mega administrators. Dotcom claims:

If servers are lost, if the government comes into a data center and rapes it, if someone hacks the server or steals it, it would give him nothing. Whatever is uploaded to the site, it is going to be remain closed and private without the key.

Mega partner Mathias Ortmann adds there is a way for companies such as movie studios and music publishers to still go after copyrighted content that is uploaded to Mega's servers. Ortmann says, "If the copyright holder finds publicly posted links and decryption keys and verifies that the file is an infringement of their copyright, they can send a DMCA takedown notice to have that file removed, just like before."

Wired's article claims that the new Mega service will launch sometime later this year but did not give a specific date.

Source: Wired | Image via Kim Dotcom

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20 Comments

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Mr Spoon said,
But I could just share that encryption key with a friend and they would be able to decrypt it?

Not sure I did follow your question correctly, but having the key equals having access to the decrypted data.

GS:mac

Mr Spoon said,
But I could just share that encryption key with a friend and they would be able to decrypt it?

Like stated, if someone is able to verify a link to the file and the key to decrypt it, it contains copyrigted material and is available to others then a takedown notice can be issued.
You could just share the file+key with a close group of friends or it could be a work based utility whereby you know that unless a colleague or client, etc has the key they cannot access the data. Think of it as a passworded .rar file you can just give them the file or have it stored on a USB stick but unless the other party has the key they aint seeing anything

Mr Spoon said,
But I could just share that encryption key with a friend and they would be able to decrypt it?

That's the point? If you give your friend your house key, he has access to your house, right?

Sly_Ripper said,
It's funny, with all this publicity Mega will probably be more popular than MegaUpload.

I hope it does! I've been waiting a long time for a decentralized "virtual drive" in cyberspace that everyone can use

I like this new Mega. now i can store my data. i dont trust Google Drive, Skydrive, Dropbox. They all give our data to FBI if they ask 4 that.

Majesticmerc said,
Maybe you didn't hear about what happened to MegaUpload earlier in the year. You know, where they gave all their users' data to the FBI?

You should link your sources.

Majesticmerc said,
Maybe you didn't hear about what happened to MegaUpload earlier in the year. You know, where they gave all their users' data to the FBI?

You forgot to mention that the FBI forcibly seized that information illegally, as it turned out. Whereas it is requested that google and the like provide it if the request is made.

KSib said,

You should link your sources.

A simple Google or Wikipedia search would suffice.

Dorza said,

You forgot to mention that the FBI forcibly seized that information illegally, as it turned out. Whereas it is requested that google and the like provide it if the request is made.

True, but how is that any different? If the FBI want your data, they'll get it. Granted they messed up with the MegaUpload Case, but given a warrant, they can legally take their data, regardless of who they are (assuming that the data is stored in the US, I don't know how it works for data stored in another country). Look at Twitter handing over the private messages of the Occupy protesters, they tried to fight it, and failed.

At the end of the day, if you don't want the authorities to take your data, don't put it on the net, period.

DMCA is an American law, it doesn't apply anywhere else. I say don't give them the ability to take down content - a suitable punishment for their behaviour.

simplezz said,
DMCA is an American law, it doesn't apply anywhere else. I say don't give them the ability to take down content - a suitable punishment for their behaviour.

Almost every western country has a DMCA-like law

simplezz said,
DMCA is an American law, it doesn't apply anywhere else. I say don't give them the ability to take down content - a suitable punishment for their behaviour.
Wrong! The Internet belongs to America!!! /s

simplezz said,
DMCA is an American law, it doesn't apply anywhere else.
Except that it does because that's how trade agreements work between countries. Steal copyrighted material from the USA, and your own government gives the USA the full right to sue you into oblivion.

ILikeTobacco said,
Except that it does because that's how trade agreements work between countries. Steal copyrighted material from the USA, and your own government gives the USA the full right to sue you into oblivion.

You have no idea what you're talking about. So stop making stupid comments. American laws don't apply outside the USA.

It still falls into NZ law before he can be extradited to the USA, hence the NZ courts are pretty much picking apart their useless case.