Last.fm strikes Sony music deal

Social music site Last.fm, bought in May for $280m (£140m) by CBS Corporation, has signed a deal with the Sony BMG record label. The partnership will give the service's 20 million users access to the entire Sony catalogue of music, including songs by the Foo fighters, Kings of Leon and Natasha Bedingfield. Started in 2002, the new deal will make Last.fm the largest web radio service the world, according to the company. "We've always aimed to have everything ever recorded available to listen to on our site, and having access to Sony's collection of some of the world's most popular music takes us another huge step closer," said Martin Stiksel, co-founder of Last.fm.

News source: BBC News

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10 Comments

A shunning for last.fm it is, then. I avoid anything that Sony does if possible, especially related to music!

*cough*rootkit*cough*

All this means is that last.fm will be allowed to broadcast music made by the Sony record label. They don't have any influence on what applications are used, or anything else regarding last.fm for that matter. So while I hate Sony, I love last.fm.. and I don't see it as a bad thing if they get more music on their radio stations.

ok? :huh:

There is more than the radio stations.You can also listen to a song on demand, click it and it will play. You cant do that with OTA FM stations.

It's not about the radio stations. It's about the community. The charts. The concerts. The music and the music you might discover there.

noroom said,
It's not about the radio stations. It's about the community. The charts. The concerts. The music and the music you might discover there.

The social music revolution. ™

noroom said,
It's not about the radio stations. It's about the community. The charts. The concerts. The music and the music you might discover there.

Excellent sales pitch. That's why I use it.

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