Lawsuit filed against use of Facebook Credits by minors

A few days ago, a group of parents filed a lawsuit against Apple, claiming that the company doesn't do enough to impose restrictions against children who want to buy in-game content for so-called "free-to-play" apps published on Apple's iOS App Store. Now another similar class action lawsuit has been filed, this time against Facebook.

PaidContent.org reports that the lawsuit was filed on Friday by Glynnis Bohannon of Arizona. She claims that her son, a minor, was able to purchase Facebook Credits, which are then used to acquire content for games such as Farmville.

Facebook's own terms of service claim that anyone under 18 can only purchase Facebook Credits with the help of parent or guardian. However, Bohannon claims that her unnamed son was unaware that he was spending real money, via her mother's credit card, to purchase Facebook Credits. Facebook gets a 30 percent cut of all in-game transactions.

A related court filing from Facebook's Manager of Payment Operation Bill Richardson claims that over $5 million in Facebook Credits were purchased in 2011 by minors age 13 to 17.

Bohannon is seeking a refund of not just the money spent by her son but also a refund for anyone in a similar situation. In an official statement, Facebook said, "We believe this complaint is without merit and we will fight it vigorously."

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13 Comments

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I am very curious on how that kids did get in reach of that credit card. I think Facebook gonna won this one for sure.

"However, Bohannon claims that her unnamed son was unaware that he was spending real money, via her mother's credit card"

"via her mother's credit card"

Well there's your problem! How do this crap even get to the news...

Pretty sure her bank wouldn't provide credit cards to minors. Facebook responsibility solved.

This is pure fail since the child would need a credit/debit card! People need to learn to take responsibility and not expect someone or a company to do it for them!

Their are always going to be things like this popping up, it happened with an ebay transaction to someone i know they sold a phone got the money and the ggirlfriend of the buyer classed the transaction as fraud because he used her credit card meaning the phone was lost and so was the money!

Also wasn't there a case like this last year with farmville and child and a mother? Zynga closed the account and she was lucky to get the money back or part of it i dont remember f top of my head. Anyway as said how are the minors getting there parents credit cards? To me seems like the parents fault for leaving there cards laying about unsafe, could security be tightend on buying fb credits? Sure! Why not add a monitoring system where if kids are under 18 there parents can add a limit per month how much they can spend that will solve most the issues and fraud allegations personally i dont think they should get there money back its their fault for not keeping there cards save from their kids, i also think the kids should lose there game account for the games they are trying to claim back because they are trying to con the company out of money either that or have there accounts reset!

Everyone wants something for nothing thats a fact and saying your kid used your CC so its fraud isn't a valid excuse imo for online games. Keep your god damn CC secure!!!

-=MagMan=- said,
Welcome to the USA, the land of no common sense, and where stupidity is the norm.

and, your the "Face" of that reason.

I hope the judge throws this case out.

How did the child get his parents credit card? Unlike Apple, this would not of been stored and I presume the child had there own facebook account. I smell fraud!

Irresponsible parenting is Facebook's fault now?
Also, I'm pretty sure most people over the age of 13 (i.e. Facebook's minimum age) know that using credit cards means you're spending real money...

CDav said,
Irresponsible parenting is Facebook's fault now?
Also, I'm pretty sure most people over the age of 13 (i.e. Facebook's minimum age) know that using credit cards means you're spending real money...

Next thing you know, a 13 year old will take the keys to their parents Honda and drive it into a tree. The parents will sue Honda saying there should have been parental controls to prevent the 13 year old from starting the engine.

Enron said,

Next thing you know, a 13 year old will take the keys to their parents Honda and drive it into a tree. The parents will sue Honda saying there should have been parental controls to prevent the 13 year old from starting the engine.


well that would be a cool idea.

How did the kid get the mother's credit card info?

Oh, wait. That would mean the parents would have to be responsible enough to keep that out of children's reach, never mind.

The rules state 18+, if he clicked agree which stated 'you must be 18 or over', I think that's classed as fraud, you're lying your age.