Lenovo Erazer X700 gaming desktop PC review

As the globe’s largest PC maker, Lenovo is well-known for its diverse portfolio of offerings spanning home and business. Gaming, on the other hand, is one area Lenovo has mostly ignored over the years. With that in mind, we introduce to you the Erazer X700 -- Lenovo’s first stab at a PC tailored for gamers.

Features which qualify the X700 as a full-fledged gaming PC are its unique exterior, performance-centered parts, ample tool-free expandability, liquid cooling and OneKey overclocking. Sound good so far?

Our review unit houses an Intel Core i7-3820, Geforce GTX 660, 12GB RAM and a 1TB HDD and a 128GB Samsung SSD. This is actually the same model available at Best Buy for $1699. It’s worth noting though that we continue to see the non-SSD version for a promotional price of $1290 directly from Lenovo.

Read: Lenovo Erazer X700 gaming desktop PC review

These articles are brought to you in partnership with TechSpot.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

UK judge blocks sales of HTC One Mini for violating Nokia patent

Next Story

Microsoft releases Lync app for Windows 8.1

33 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Looks impressive, if it didn't have the Lenovo logo, at this angle it could be mistaken for a paper shredder.

I see the case-modding community from the turn of the century grew up and got jobs so they can mass market their horrible taste.

It's:

* Overdesigned and overpriced (that discount should be its normal price)
It looks like a tin psspot from inside. A $40 Cooler Master, say, K280, for example, presents vastly better management and workmanship qualities than this.

* Completely unbalanced
SB-E or IB-E - but it's not even available, because they probably have overstock of SB-E -, is absolutely unnecessary for gaming and 3820/4820K are both 100% niche products in general.

* Basic configuration 12 GB RAM - not using quad-channel potential, quite probably hard to find a stick that will complement this configuration. But one doesn't even need neither this amount nor quad-channel for any gaming in the foreseeable future.
CL is not advertised. CL10? CL11, perhaps? You know you got to cheapskate with consumer ignorance card.

* It's mounted the other way round, which spits in face of all airflow lessons ever made and component design. Graphics cards suck cold air in from below. Power supply should be bottom mounted because electrolytic capacitors die prematurely mainly due to heat. I wonder, do hard drives even get proper circulation or are they, too, destined to die prematurely?

* No power supply specs (or any specs, for that matter) readily available, so it's not possible to determine accurate pricing and aftermarket upgrade potential. And that no-name generic spark supply is probably complete rubbish anyway, bare minimum to run it and that's it.

* Vendor-locked. There's Lenovo custom board (have you seen mATX X79?) with locked down UEFI settings and very likely severe driver issues once they'll drop support for it. Also, the mentioned bloatware.

* Advertises features that are there for any medium level board (S/PDIF) and USB 3.0 (any given damn) as advantages.

* It should be a mortal sin not to offer an SSD for any new system. Consumer ignorance makes good soil for planned obsolescence, costly brand warranties and brand help services.

Such types of configurations are suitable for home and business use. Gaming and workstation PCs should be custom made to spec, just like racing cars are.

/rant

perhaps we are entering another era of custom PC's made by the users themselves? They buy the hardware and case they like, as they like.

Phouchg said,
It's:

* Basic configuration 12 GB RAM - not using quad-channel potential, quite probably hard to find a stick that will complement this configuration. But one doesn't even need neither this amount nor quad-channel for any gaming in the foreseeable future.
CL is not advertised. CL10? CL11, perhaps? You know you got to cheapskate with consumer ignorance card.


Ram is 3x4GB sticks, easy to add a fourth to. Latency is, as you said, unknown, and I can't find anything on Lenovo's site about it.

Phouchg said,

* It's mounted the other way round, which spits in face of all airflow lessons ever made and component design. Graphics cards suck cold air in from below. Power supply should be bottom mounted because electrolytic capacitors die prematurely mainly due to heat. I wonder, do hard drives even get proper circulation or are they, too, destined to die prematurely?

Ahh, the old hot air rises thing. Here's the thing though, yes, hot air *can* pool at the top of a case, but the airflow from even the smallest, weakest fan is enough to overcome any airflow due to convection. Turn your case upside down and run it. I'll bet you don't see more than a degree extra.

Phouchg said,

* No power supply specs (or any specs, for that matter) readily available, so it's not possible to determine accurate pricing and aftermarket upgrade potential. And that no-name generic spark supply is probably complete rubbish anyway, bare minimum to run it and that's it.

Power supply is 625W, 80 Plus gold. Made by ACBel, which as far as OEM power supplies go, are pretty decent.

Phouchg said,

* Vendor-locked. There's Lenovo custom board (have you seen mATX X79?) with locked down UEFI settings and very likely severe driver issues once they'll drop support for it. Also, the mentioned bloatware.

The BIOS is pretty weak, agreed, but the board is a standard MATX form factor. The case also appears to take ATX if you feel so inclined.

Phouchg said,

* It should be a mortal sin not to offer an SSD for any new system. Consumer ignorance makes good soil for planned obsolescence, costly brand warranties and brand help services.

SSD is offered as an option.

According to TH, RAM is 1600 CL11, which is yet another marketing ploy. The slowest possible 1600, well done. X79 bandwidth capabilities getting thrown out of the window right there. It might or might not be easy to add that fourth stick, depending on how well Lenovo made that custom board. Mixing chips works just as often as it doesn't. Of course, if you choose Lenovo's own service, they will have them at hand as much as you need, right?

TH (and sense uncommon) confirms that X79 was a bad choice for this in general. It's absolutely not a gaming PC for any other reasons than its overdesigned plastic trim.

I stand corrected about the power suppy. ACBel is said to be decent. Wiring looks like the most cheapest mid-tier unit in existance, but then again - everything in there does exactly that.

The problem with air circulation is - PSU pulls it up and out, graphics card pulls it down and rad fan pulls it from below and out. The single intake fan will not be able to accomodate proper circulation and underpressure will cause severe dust build-ups down the road. And since it's prebuilt, nobody will ever open and clean at least the rad until fire starts or something. Dust will also settle inside the graphics card's heatsink as opposed to mostly being on PCB.

The case has very much wasted space in terms of HDD expansion options and in general. Even the board only has four ports. Once again, why X79 then? Did they really buy a truckload of Intel's SB-E overstock at the yard sale?

The thing about mATX is that altogether lacks the expansion capabilities that make X79 a premium class choice in the first place.

And SSD should not be an option, but the only damn way.

We might say it's barely passable as their first experiment into this field, but I'm afraid no critique will matter down the road as notebook market has been doing all this crap for years on end.

/more-rant

morden said,
it looks like something a 10yr old would draw; but 10yr olds dont have $1300

See, I think it looks like an Autobot about to transform into something =). Or maybe it is transformed and now is my gaming PC.

But I wouldnt pay $1300 for it. Buy the parts and make it myself, I would =).

Lord Method Man said,
People won't know its a gaming PC unless it has all sorts of funky angles, excess plastic accents, and arrays of LEDs everywhere.

Excess plastic indeed: http://static.techspot.com/articles-info/743/images/20p.jpg

I like my computers to be sleek/elegant. I've got gaming rig packed into a little Mini-ITX Fractal Design Node 304: https://hostr.co/file/4aEbin6f4fWg/Node304Innards.jpg ...lots of horsepower tucked away in a case the size of a small subwoofer.

warwagon said,
Why are most OEM gaming machines so UGLY?

I suggest you look at the gaudy and horrible gaming boxes that people upload pictures off as bring their pride and joy. Sorry but the gaming community's aesthetic is cringe worthy.

Caleo said,

Excess plastic indeed: http://static.techspot.com/articles-info/743/images/20p.jpg

I like my computers to be sleek/elegant. I've got gaming rig packed into a little Mini-ITX Fractal Design Node 304: https://hostr.co/file/4aEbin6f4fWg/Node304Innards.jpg ...lots of horsepower tucked away in a case the size of a small subwoofer.

Oh man that is a beautiful little piece, I would love to start working on having a little beast like that. Care to share the parts you are using?