Lenovo recalls 160,000 PCs due to fire risk

Lenovo has issued a recall notice for over 160,000 of its PCs, due to a defective component that poses a fire hazard. According to a report from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, two examples have so far been reported – one described as a ‘fire incident’, the other a ‘smoke incident’ – but thankfully, neither one resulted in any injuries.

The recall applies specifically to certain ThinkCentre M70z and M90z all-in-one PCs, namely those whose manufacturing date code falls within the following ranges: 1001 to 1012; 1101 to 1112; 001 to 012; and 101 to 112. The manufacturing date code can be found on a label on the device underside. The affected systems were sold in the United States between May 2010 and January 2012.

The US CPSC report describes the fault as “a defect in an internal component in the power supply [which] can overheat and pose a fire hazard”. It recommends that “consumers should immediately stop using the computers, unplug the power supply and contact the firm to determine if your computer is included in the recall and to schedule an appointment for a free replacement of the power supply”.

Curiously, while the US Consumer Product Safety Commission claims that around 50,500 systems were affected, Lenovo itself says that it is recalling 160,000 systems.

Concerned users can contact Lenovo toll-free on (855) 248 2194 or visit www.lenovo.com/aiopsurecall.

One person we know could be affected is our very own member TheReasonIFailed, who won a Lenovo M90z back in December 2010. We've sent a message advising to check if that Lenovo is affected.

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Thanks for the heads up. The manufacturing date on mine is 1102; so it's seems I'm getting this puppy fixed.

Other than the potential for this being a huge fireball this PC is great; I love this thing!!!

Thanks again!

On lenovo Website they say
"Lenovo is voluntarily recalling 160,000 ThinkCentre M70z and ThinkCentre M90z all-in-one (AIO) desktop PCs worldwide sold between May 2010 and January 2012"

I can't really see it lol, sorry if I have totally missed it, it has been a long morning and we have 20 of those units >.<

The cost of using cheap parts, as far as I know the main thing that goes wrong with cheap laptops/small computers is the power supply. My grans battery died(wouldn't hold charge). My sisters acer laptop the power system just failed and needed a whole new laptop. Then my sisters Samsung netbook battery wouldn't hold charge.

Hopefully using cheap power parts has stopped in the computing business.

Gaffney said,
The cost of using cheap parts, as far as I know the main thing that goes wrong with cheap laptops/small computers is the power supply. My grans battery died(wouldn't hold charge). My sisters acer laptop the power system just failed and needed a whole new laptop. Then my sisters Samsung netbook battery wouldn't hold charge.

Hopefully using cheap power parts has stopped in the computing business.

Main problem with the laptop batteries not holding charge is lack of cycles. Usually the result of them left permininatly on mains power with the brick.

A laptop's battery needs to regularly fully discharged and then fully charged again. Failing to give it a good cycle like that will dramatically reduce the life of the battery. A typical battery will last for 2-3 years and is best stored with around 75% battery power for optimal degradation and life span of the battery.

If the laptops are being used mainly on AC/mains power, then its best to remove the battery from the laptop once its charged and store it with the laptop bag until it needs to be made portable.

sagum said,

Main problem with the laptop batteries not holding charge is lack of cycles. Usually the result of them left permininatly on mains power with the brick.

A laptop's battery needs to regularly fully discharged and then fully charged again. Failing to give it a good cycle like that will dramatically reduce the life of the battery. A typical battery will last for 2-3 years and is best stored with around 75% battery power for optimal degradation and life span of the battery.

If the laptops are being used mainly on AC/mains power, then its best to remove the battery from the laptop once its charged and store it with the laptop bag until it needs to be made portable.

Man! What kind of ancient battery are you still using? The Li-ion (Lithium-ion) that are in use now a days, and have been for a while, don't require that crap anymore!

Prolonging battery pack life
Avoid deep discharge and instead charge more often between uses, the smaller the depth of discharge, the longer the battery will last.[96]
Avoid storing the battery in full discharged state. As the battery will self-discharge over time, its voltage will gradually lower, and when it is depleted below the low-voltage threshold (2.4 to 2.9 V/cell, depending on chemistry) it cannot be charged anymore because the protection circuit (a type of electronic fuse) disables it.[96]
Lithium-ion batteries should be kept cool; they may be stored in a refrigerator.[96][97]
The rate of degradation of Lithium-ion batteries is strongly temperature-dependent; they degrade much faster if stored or used at higher temperatures.[96][98]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium-ion_battery

neufuse said,

Quick, buy liability insurance!!!!!!! RUN NEOBOND! hehe j/k

I've done hurt myself trying to unplug the machine due to the potential for fire. If I never would of won this; I would still be OK. I will be taking Neowin to court and sueing them for all their worth or the cost of a band-aid which I used to supress the bleeding; which ever is greater!

P.S.: I'm kidding...just want to make that clear...