Lenovo reveals 27-inch touchscreen AIO-tablet Windows 8 PC, testing 39-incher

Lenovo is starting up CES 2013 with a very big announcement, and we do mean big. The PC maker just announced plans to release the IdeaCentre Horizon Table PC, a massive 17.8 pound, 27-inch all-in-one Windows 8 PC that can also be laid flat on any surface.

While the PC does have a kickstand that allows it to be placed on a table or desk and used like any other AIO PC, Lenovo has created the IdeaCentre Horizon Table PC with extra features for use when it is placed flat like a really big tablet. Lenovo estimates the battery life in this mode is about two hours. When placed flat, it also automatically turns on a special UI, Lenovo Aura, designed specifically for use in that mode.

Lenovo is even including a set of unique add-ons with the PC:

It comes with a special set of accessories including an e-dice and four joysticks and strikers to offer a completely new digital gaming experience that combines the physical gaming accessory with the on-screen action. For the player, the action is part physical, part digital - an activity that Lenovo refers to as "phygital."

Yes, they did say "phygital". We suspect that will be the new Internet meme of the year.

In any case, the Lenovo IdeaCentre Horizon Table PC will also come with its own app download store where people can access new games and apps, including mobile apps that will run on the BlueStacks emulator. In terms of hardware, the PC will support up to Intel's Core i7 processor and will have a NVIDIA GeForce GT 620M graphics chip inside with 1 GB of RAM.

The PC will also support up to 8 GB of memory and up to 1 TB of hard drive storage, with an option to add a 64 GB SSD. The screen itself supports up to 1920x1080 resolution. Other features include a integrated webcam and a 6-in-1 card reader. It will be released sometime this summer with a starting price of $1,699.

Oh, one more thing. Lenovo says that it is also testing a similar all-in-one PC that can be laid flat but has a display of 39 inches! This product, which has the code name "Gamma", does not have a release date but Lenovo says it "is indicative of Lenovo's future direction in Table PC computing."

Source: Lenovo email press release | Image via Lenovo

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thealexweb said,
So many of these touch PCs are beyond the reach of most, cost alone will ensure touch PCs remain a niche for now

Some of these are in the 1000-1400 range, which isn't a massive jump over non-touch based PCs.

There are smaller screen touch based PCs that have been available for several years in the 500-800 range as well.

Not sure how you see this as overly expensive or a niche market.

Moving up to a bigger display with imaging based pixel sense technology is a niche market as they cost several thousand, but even those won't be out of the range of average consumers before long.

It says 27 inch Tablet in the title ! ..... So how longs the battery last on that ? Not long me thinks but Id love one to be honest.

Are people expected to take these off their desks/tables to place them flat on their tables more than a couple of times. I don't get this flat mode much. What's the point? Why would people want to do that other than gaming but how populat do they expect this to be?

I can imagine them being quite popular in Office/Design Studio situations, or for product demos, or other collaborative scenarios.

I can't imagine using a desktop setup for Touch - raising my arm a stretching out to touch the screen thousands of times a day?! if that becomes the norm the number of rotator cuff/shoulder surgeries will sky-rocket!

Must be getting pushed by orthopedic surgeons...!

Will give a couple of years for the technology to develop well, and bring some Gorilla Glass to the table

It's very pleasant to bring memories from the true Surface.

After watching the video: It's quite sleek, and at a good price too (if we compare it to the Surface whose price rose over the 10k)

Jose_49 said,
After watching the video: It's quite sleek, and at a good price too (if we compare it to the Surface whose price rose over the 10k)

What made/makes the original Surface (PixelSense) expensive is that it is NOT a traditional touch based display technology.

It uses 'imaging' to detect touch, size, pressure and images on the display to respond. This is why Windows 7's Touch API set was expand to 50 input points supporting pressure, tilt, size, shape, and image. It can see fingers, paintbrushes, glasses sitting on the display, bar codes, even can see the room light sources change and respond to them.

It is 'far' beyond a 'multi-touch' technology, but is the future of interactive displays.

It is a small thing, but it really is dismissive to classify the PixelSense (Surface) technology with traditional touch technologies.

thenetavenger said,
It can see fingers, paintbrushes, glasses sitting on the display, bar codes, even can see the room light sources change and respond to them.

And that is why the Surface really impressed me.

How many monitors out there have the same resolution of the Thunderbolt Display? My current monitor on my Mac Mini has 1920x1080 and I must say, I still find it unfair when I can still see pixels. Though the colors on here are just gorgeous.

mrp04 said,
Bleh 1920x1080 at 27"?

I see Apple marketing is still working on the weaker mindsets. When Apple only offered 1680x1050 displays, they made fun of the 2K and 1080p PC displays. Weird how they changed what people consider to be 'good'.

When Toshiba was pushing 2K and 4K displays in 2006, the market wasn't supporting it because users were happy with 720p and 1080p displays, especially when Apple was making fun of the 1080p displays based on their OSes lack of scaling technology.

Now Apple's failings at anti-aliasing has pushed them to offer higher resolution displays, they don't realize that text can be as crisp on a 1080p Windows system as a 2k Apple display.

(And don't be fooled that the 'extra' pixels on Apple displays are used for much more than font rendering, as they don't have the GPU power to even do modest full resolution 3D applications.)

Mr.XXIV said,
How many monitors out there have the same resolution of the Thunderbolt Display? My current monitor on my Mac Mini has 1920x1080 and I must say, I still find it unfair when I can still see pixels. Though the colors on here are just gorgeous.

Weird that the color are gorgeous considering OS X can't produce as many colors, and their Retinal displays dither for 24bit color more than displays from other manufacturers like Toshiba.

thenetavenger said,

Weird that the color are gorgeous considering OS X can't produce as many colors, and their Retinal displays dither for 24bit color more than displays from other manufacturers like Toshiba.

I was talking about my monitor itself.

thenetavenger said,

I see Apple marketing is still working on the weaker mindsets. When Apple only offered 1680x1050 displays, they made fun of the 2K and 1080p PC displays. Weird how they changed what people consider to be 'good'.

So liking a resolution higher than 1920x1080 on a 27in monitor is due to Apple's marketing on the weak minded, and it has nothing to do with personal preference?

Please.

Who cares what Apple did in that past? To some, 2560x1440 looks better than 1920x1080 on a 27in. Also, who cares if OS X can't produce as many colors as the next guy over? Looks are subjective, and if it looks great to someone, then who are you to say otherwise?