LG Unveils Second-Generation Super Multi Blue Drives

LG Electronics, a leading maker of consumer electronics, has reportedly announced its second-generation hybrid optical disk drives for personal computers (PCs). The novelties can read all four disk formats currently sold, including Blu-ray discs (BDs), CDs, DVDs and HD DVDs, which brings quite some value to end-users wishing to watch high-definition movies on their PCs.

The new drives in the Super Multi Blue family of LG are LG GGW-H20LI and LG GGC-H20LI. The former can read and record CDs, DVDs and BDs as well as read HD DVDs, whereas the latter supports recording on CDs and DVDs and reading all four types of discs. Both feature LightScribe technology that can create labels on optical discs.

It is interesting to note that LG GGW-H20LI and LG GGC-H20LI will cost $499 and $399, respectively, which is much closer to mainstream price-points at which customers will really start to get the novelties. Earlier Blu-ray disc burners could retail for about $1000, which did not allow them to become really popular. Meanwhile, the most affordable HD DVD drives for PCs from Toshiba cost approximately $250 in the U.S

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News source: Xbit Labs

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Naive me, but if there weren't competing formats, you think we might have cheaper burnable media for HDDVD or Blu-Ray? I'd love it if the media came down to $2 to $3 a disk. I'd buy it up in a jiffy.

DrunkenMaster said,
Naive me, but if there weren't competing formats, you think we might have cheaper burnable media for HDDVD or Blu-Ray? I'd love it if the media came down to $2 to $3 a disk. I'd buy it up in a jiffy.
if anything I'd think the competition will result in price dives sooner than they would if there wasnt competition. At least in movie's sales they seem to be trying to out perform eachother with promotions and the like and when PC writers become more common I'm sure they will turn their attention to lowering media costs.

Got a few questions:

1) Are they mountable in an external enclosure? Will the USB2/Firewire/Whatever interface sustain the high bitrate needed to burn Bluray/HD-DVD discs?

2) Is the burner SATA?

My laptop would be the only computer in the house capable of reading BD/HD-DVD video streams properly, and I don't want to mount it in my old Athlon XP 2200+ rig.

Mass production = lower price. Right now HD-DVD R and BD-R are very much niche products, not many people buy them. When drives become cheap enough and more people start buying discs, production goes up and price comes down. I remember when DVD-R first came out, the blank discs were like luxury items that I never thought I'd be able to afford. Now they are so cheap they're practically disposable, same will happen with the HD discs.

The problem is that there's little reason for a family to buy an HD-DVD or Blu-ray player unless they are 1) educated enough to know what these formats allow and 2) hve a ton of money.

DVD took off only because it provided several compelling reasons to switch from VHS, and even then it took 7 years from its introduction to eclipse VHS sales in 2002. Besides looking nice on an *expensive* HDTV, Blu-ray & HD-DVD offer nothing to the masses.

And we haven't even brought in the fact that both camps are screwing themselves over because no one in their right midn should by either of these formats until they quit their bickering and combine to sell me ONE product. Till then, I'll get my HD fix elsewhere.

dagamer34 said,
And we haven't even brought in the fact that both camps are screwing themselves over because no one in their right midn should by either of these formats until they quit their bickering and combine to sell me ONE product. Till then, I'll get my HD fix elsewhere.
True...although players such as LG's will only become ever increasingly common and really make the format war obsolete in my opinion. As long as the hardwares there to support both formats in one device I dont think it'll matter what format people have in the long run.

atm...the short run...its a total mess but.

What most people are forgetting is that you're using an HD Monitor to post these comments. You don't need an awesome television to experience the benefits of HD-DVD/Blu-Ray over DVD and VHS.

Tech is outpacing the needs of most consumers, as well as the budgets of teens who make up a large part of these entertainment purchases. There's no "killer app" for much of this stuff.

Anyone can explain me why Blue-ray [sic] exist? AFAIK Blue-ray [sic] are just for people that have money and they don't know on what waste it. Backup? An external HDD costs a lot less than a HD-DVDs and Blue-rays. [sic] Movies? You're telling me everyone in the world owns huge a$$ TV's that need higher quality than the normal, cheap DVD's? Blue-rays [sic] and HD-DVDs is just something rich people would buy... or just people that want to impress others.

I'd wait for the holographic ones, if I want to backup stuff up.

Those huge ass TVs are cheaper than those BluRay players, so yeah, more and more people are getting their HD TVs, it's only a matter of time. Right now, yes, they're expensive. But DVD were even MORE expensive than BD/HD-DVD are now and yet people bought them.

I watch my movies on my computers LCD monitor so I would love the extra resolution HD movies offer. As a student holding down a part time job I hardly see myself as rich either. I wouldnt buy it to impress others...I'd buy it to see movies and films in a more impressive definition fitting to my display.

Noones telling you that "everyone" owns a HD tv.


Secondly HD's may be practical size wise but who wants to mess around with installing a damn HD every time you want to make a pernament backup of something and then reinstalling it when you want to access said data. HD's are likely more succeptable to damage too unless storred propperly and take up more space.

high-quality, perhaps still really expensive TVs, for which DVD doesn't scale well, will soon become the norm, even in the United States come 2009

The novelties can read all four disk formats currently sold, including Blu-ray discs (BDs), CDs, DVDs and HD DVDs, which brings quite some value to end-users wishing to watch high-definition movies on their PCs.

Novelty? I see it as being very useful, not a novelty.

I was wondering about the choice of wording there too. Perhaps it's one of those UK vs US English things like some site's use of the word "scheme" (which simply means plan in UK English but has negative connotations in US English).

Yay, Blu-ray burning! Another thing I've noticed is that while the media still seems a bit pricey (that's more of a factor to me -- the burner is just a one-time purchase after all), BD-R discs give you better bang per buck than HD-DVD-R discs, at least on WeSellCD.com where I use to buy as a Scandinavian. But even considering that, they're a bit pricey. However, Blu-ray is far closer to being really interesting for me for burning than HD-DVD.

Edit: Here's the prices I see there...

Verbatim HD-DVD-R 1x speed, 15GB, jewelcase, 5 discs: $75 ($15/disc)
Verbatim BD-R 2x speed, 25GB, jewelcase, 5 discs: $89 ($17.8/disc)
Verbatim BD-RE 2x speed, 25GB, jewelcase, 5 discs: $139 ($27.8/disc)

So a HD-DVD-R currently gives you around $1/GB, a BD-R around $0.7/GB, and a DVD-R < $0.2/GB. ;)

They're hopefully getting more competitive sooner rather than later though. Cheaper burners is sure a good first step.

Hey, it was only about 10 years ago that CD burners were $1000 and discs were $20 each, so it's only a matter of time before prices drop to more reasonable levels.

seen futureshop got the 4x LG blu-ray burner on for $380.. definatly dropping in price. when it takes another $100 dip I will invest.