LG's 105-inch curved 4K TV is a bargain at just $117,000

Most of us find ourselves spending just a little beyond our means when we buy new gadgets, but spending $129,000 on a TV is perhaps overdoing it. Nonetheless, Samsung has attached that price tag to its curved 105-inch ultra-wide Ultra HD TV, sadly putting it out of the reach of most TV watchers who may not even earn that kind of dough in a whole year. 

But if you can't quite afford such a vast amount of money for a TV, don't panic - LG has got you covered. It has also launched a curved 105-inch ultra-wide Ultra HD TV, but those of you on a budget will be delighted to hear that it's much cheaper than Samsung's ridiculously priced model. 

LG's LCD TV costs just $117,000 and on top of that significant saving of $12,000 compared with the Samsung, you'll also get a large integrated speaker, which the Samsung lacks.

The LG's price is a direct currency version from the 120 million won it will cost in South Korea - but there is hope that it may be even cheaper in the US. Engadget reports that LG hinted at a price closer to $70,000 when it showed off the giant device at CES earlier this year, so when it goes on sale in the US it could well prove to be a good deal cheaper than the $117,000 it costs in Korea. 

But if you're the kind of person that can realistically afford to spend this kind of money on a frickin' TV, let's face it - you can probably afford to buy both the Samsung and the LG without even blinking. And hey, if you need anyone to help you test them out, we'll be happy to bring the popcorn. 

Source: Engadget | image: LG via Engadget

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My current LG Smart TV cost 1/40 of my annual salary, so I guess I'll have to wait until I'm earning about $4.7 million a year before I consider this :)

Xerino said,
other than people who shot home movies on their 4k cameras, is there even any real support for 4k yet???

Yes, Netflix is now streaming in 4K and there are some 4K blu-rays

Bargain? The 53" rear projection TV I got for free was a bargain! Got it used from my old boss, and used it for 5 years. I sold it, still working perfectly, to an old friend (only because he insisted on giving me money for it). It was SD, but the best SD image I've ever seen.

Nice as my current 42" HD set is, I still kind of miss the old monster. . . Yeah, the resolution is much higher, but the old set had kind of a movie theater feel to the image. Turn down the lights, put Gojira in, awesomeness!

"you'll also get a large integrated speaker, which the Samsung lacks."

That cracks me up. Who would spend over $100k on a TV and then use the speakers that came with it??? Maybe it is a great speaker, but even if it is, someone with that kind of A/V budget, is probably super picky and already has some hand made over priced speaker set they plan to use.

Ha! Mine is still bigger by an inch and way cheaper! LOL
Granted it is just 1080P and not curve, but I am happy with it!

By the time 4K content comes out, which will take at least a year, prices for 4K sets will be at least 1/2. These devices are for early adopters, who help finance the R&D for new tech. Its the same thing as buying the latest overpriced Intel cpu and motherboard and $2k video cards.

There is already some 4K content out, but it is VERY limited. Honestly, the biggest problem with 4K is that the TVs are not big enough. Most people's angular distance from their TV is too far to even fully see the benefit of 1080p. Based on THX specs, you should be no more than 6 feet from a 1080p 50" screen. Most people's living rooms are setup with 10+ feet viewing distances. Even with a 70", 10 feet is starting to lose 1080p detail for the average person's eyes. 4K basically cuts that in half. So 4 feet away from a 70" 4K TV???? Year right!!

I don't see any point in moving to 4K until I can buy something 100+" for a reasonable amount.

sphbecker said,
There is already some 4K content out, but it is VERY limited. Honestly, the biggest problem with 4K is that the TVs are not big enough. Most people's angular distance from their TV is too far to even fully see the benefit of 1080p. Based on THX specs, you should be no more than 6 feet from a 1080p 50" screen. Most people's living rooms are setup with 10+ feet viewing distances. Even with a 70", 10 feet is starting to lose 1080p detail for the average person's eyes. 4K basically cuts that in half. So 4 feet away from a 70" 4K TV???? Year right!!

I don't see any point in moving to 4K until I can buy something 100+" for a reasonable amount.

Finally the voice of reason has spoken!

Contrary to the ego of the internet comment community and blogosphere, not everything is meant for wide-spread consumer use.

This is the kind of thing an overfunded start-up will grab for their lobby and conference rooms.

The price is so high because they know they aren't going to be producing this in volume.

You can get a really good large screen (120+") and a projector for 1/10th that. I am looking forward to these coming down though, as I am looking forward to the black diamond screens coming down.

sc302 said,
You can get a really good large screen (120+") and a projector for 1/10th that. I am looking forward to these coming down though, as I am looking forward to the black diamond screens coming down.

that's great and all, but how much does a 4K projector cost? hint, it ain't cheap... a GOOD one like from Christie cost $100k, a cehap consumer one still costs multi thousands $11k+ from sony... and I'm not talking about a HD projector that claims 4K up conversion but still is only 1080p in resolution

Years ago the price for a 14" "Flat" (LCD) monitor was more than $1,000....
The prices for the first Sony plasma TVs were in the $7,000/8,000....
Prices will go down and.... people who have room to accommodate a 110" TV do not have a 1,000 ft. house.

Krome said,
The 1% will reveal themself soon, by buying one or two for their mansion/villa.

1% was like 20 years ago. Today it's more like 0.1%

Hm a bargain based on what? PPI? Just screen size? I guess based on Samsung as a benchmark. Not sure if that is a good benchmark or not.