Linus Torvalds switches to GNOME

Approximately two years after Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel, stated that the GNOME environment "in striving to be simple, no longer does what [he] needs", has made the switch from KDE to GNOME.

KDE is a graphical user interface for the Linux/GNU operating system environment, it is best known for its functionality. Something which Linus once touted "confused" the "idiot" users of GNOME.

GNOME is also a graphical user interface, which is regarded as more minimalistic than KDE.

In an interview with Rodney Gedda of NetworkWorld, Linus states that the 4.0 release of KDE is what really pushed him towards using GNOME.

"I used to be a KDE user. I thought KDE 4.0 was such a disaster I switched to GNOME... The whole 'break everything' model is painful for users and they can choose to use something else" Linus said regarding his switch.

All hope is not lost, the once very vocal KDE advocate has stated that while KDE made many half-baked changes in 4.0, it may be the best decision in the long run and he will not hesitate to try it once more.

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Meh I use Gnome at home and KDE at Uni with NetBsd. We've kept with kde 3.5 so far I believe, so I can't comment on version 4 but I like both (Gnome and KDE 3.5 that is) a lot. As for either being "cheap Windows knock-offs" or something to that effect as some people have been commenting seriously go **** off. Everything in Windows is so derivative you wouldn't be ripping off Windows even if you did emulate its window manager and yes all window managers try to cover similar ground otherwise users will not be able to migrate between environments, which is what Linux wants, effectively. Anyway a little history for you, Steve Jobs ripped the first GUI off Xerox Parc for the LISA and then the Macintosh which Microsoft ripped off (Badly) for Windows, further implementations saw Microsoft get ahead through a greater hold on the market, Jobs was fired then later rehired by Apple through their purchase of Jobs side project NextOS based on Unix and their BSD project Darwin. As you can see as I have outlined incredibly roughly gui implementations have always been an incestuous affair as I see it everyone is ripping off everyone, however I think Compiz or whatever other fancy gui things you use with your OpenSource distro is implemented a hell of a lot better than Microsoft or OSX. Also it's FREE!!! I asked my friend recently who bought Vista Ultimate for some reason why he did it and what the advantages were and they were mainly gui related, "Oh I get this multiple windows thing if I press these buttons" LOL. Apparently they don't give you some of these nifty little tricks in the basic version god I'm glad I don't let Microsoft rape me anymore.

RangerLG said,
Real Linux users use command line anyway! :)

So someone who use Linux as a workstation and want to do some programming with a graphical user interface is not a real Linux user :P

Approximately two years after Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel, stated that the GNOME environment "in striving to be simple, no longer does what [he] needs", [HE] has made the switch from KDE to GNOME.

As you can see I've added a new word.

Please learn to write, it makes reading easier.

KDE 4 was a complete mess when released, and still is IMO not a viable alternative to KDE 3. Therefore I've stuck with KDE 3 and still have the advanced features of kdevelop and quanta for development, and konqueror for my filebrowsing (why they dropped the more developer-friendly konqueror and moved to the quite frankly awful Nautilus-like Dolphin is beyond me - one of the reasons I can't use GNOME for development is the serious lack of features in Nautilus). For GUI developers, KDE 3 is still be far the more superior development environment, as it offers unparalleled features and allows for very quick deployment of applications - in my experience a GTK project takes about 2-3 times longer. For a developer like Linux the DE makes little difference, as he's dealing with non-GUI kernel development, and this is best done with a tool like Emacs, not a full IDE - which is just overkill. For users who programs apps with a GUI QT4 is buggy, and KDE 4 doesn't provide the necessary tools (although Kdevelop 3.1.4 works fine), although for a normal user who needs to just view the web, use office documents, IM and check email, either KDE 4 or GNOME do the job splendidly.

"Something which Linus once touted "confused" the "idiot" users of GNOME."

This is not a complete sentence; this is a sentence fragment. How do I get a job working here? Geez.

It's nice to have options of how basic or glitzy you want your desktop to be. You do not get that with Windows or OS X other than skinning.

I don't use Linux much, but whenever I do, I greatly prefer Kde over Gnome - *especially* the new Kde 4.
It seems he can't make up his mind on things when he switches around from bashing to praising that quickly.

Wait, what?

Linus Torvalds switches to GNOME
Approximately two years after Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel, stated that the GNOME environment "in striving to be simple, no longer does what [he] needs", has made the switch from KDE to GNOME

Is he switching to KDE or to gnome?

You missed highlighting the "two years after" part.

Two years ago, he criticized Gnome. Now, he is critical of what has happened in recent KDE development that prompted his switch from KDE to Gnome.

markjensen said,
You missed highlighting the "two years after" part.

Two years ago, he criticized Gnome. Now, he is critical of what has happened in recent KDE development that prompted his switch from KDE to Gnome.

Syntactically it's not correct. "Linus Torvalds", "stated that.." and "has made"

My first WM was Gnome, then I switched to xfce purely out of curiosity. Love em both; xfce really is lightweight :)

I tried KDE for a day, and I don't doubt that you can customize it to look and feel good... but the KDE designers (or the Kubuntu folks?) have obviously never heard of this thing called "usability". Navigating through the options, let alone common application windows, was such a headaching NIGHTMARE that I never touched it again! I'd love to give it a chance, tho, honestly... what good KDE distros are there other than Kubuntu, and are easy to use by the default settings?

Maybe give openSUSE a go. They are known to implement KDE and tweak it very nicely.
What version of KDE have you tried before, if I can ask you that?

Gnome is more small screen friendly IMO than KDE4. I had KDE4 on my 10" net book and the panel at the bottom took up too much room and wasn't easily resized without messing stuff up. Plus KDE4 reminds me too much of windows.

the question is..can KDE 4.0 be fixed? but I'm surprised that the gnome and KDE haven't had any staggering improvements to give us an improved desktop.

I'm an eye candy kind of guy.

what do you think of this xfce? I've never used it.

ChrisJ1968 said,
the question is..can KDE 4.0 be fixed? but I'm surprised that the gnome and KDE haven't had any staggering improvements to give us an improved desktop.

I'm an eye candy kind of guy.

KDE is currently at version 4.1.

KDE 4.2 will be released in two days from now. :)

http://kde.org/

Traitor! LOL

Seriously KDE 4.0 was a bit disappointing and in my honest opinion it shouldn't even be 4.0. But what's done is done, now KDE is about to release 4.2 and it is much more usable and stable. I believe Linus will change his opinion about KDE and maybe will reconsider going back, when he has a chance to test this new release... :)

Although GNOME is a nice desktop too, a bit limited for some people's taste but nice and simple.

For those trying to figure out what Gnome and KDE look like...

KDE looks similar to Windows (initially -- the start menu is drastically different in 4.0)
Gnome looks similar to Mac OS (remove the bottom bar on most default installs and add a dock)

Then you have XFCE and IceWM which are true minimalist environments.

KDE 4.0 is pretty good but it certain feels complex to figure out the changes from previous versions.

Gnome on the other hand, works well and it feels more comfortable to use for novices in linux like myself.

I've never liked KDE, although I haven't tried it for over a year or so. It always seemed so big and fisher price like to me

AeronPrometheus said,
[citation needed] :P

I can't find citation for it myself, but I recall Torvalds using WindowMaker (with very few dockapps) during his work on 2.4. He mentioned it briefly on LKML on several occasions.

I have to agree that KDE 4.0 is such a disaster! I never felt ease working in KDE 4.0! GNOME has come a long way and has interesting updates

KDE 4 is definitely following suit with Aero in vista and 7, in many ways and is pushing the boundary for GUI for linux but it's also full of a lot of inconsistencies and they're still working towards taking the eye candy as well as functionality and working on moulding it into a great all in one GUI package. I agree that GNOME is plain and simple in many ways can be like Windows Classic, but I believe KDE will come around just as Snow Leopard and 7 are getting to aswell.