Lots of iOS 5 customers use Microsoft's Hotmail

Microsoft's Hotmail isn't just for PC users. Indeed, people who purchase Apple's iOS-based devices seem to love using Microsoft's web-based email service. In a new post on Microsoft's Windows Live blog, Microsoft's Chris Jones says that its been easier to link Hotmail to mobile devices since it launched the Exchange Active Sync program in 2010.

And apparently iPhone and iPad users are taking advantage of this fact with Jones writing that since the launch of iOS 5 in October over 2 million people with iOS-based products have connected to Hotmail through those devices with 100,000 new users added each day.

As you can see in the chart above, a combined 64 percent of Hotmail iOS users have either an iPhone 4 or the new iPhone 4S, with another 12 percent using the iPhone 3GS. The rest of the iOS-based products, including iPads, are in the single digit percentage numbers on the chart for using Hotmail.

The blog points out that other mobile products based on Android, Nokia and Blackberry platforms can also connect to Hotmail. Of course that also included Microsoft's own Windows Phone 7 client. However it is a testament to Hotmail's success that nearly all smartphone and tablet products can connect to Hotmail in some way. Indeed, a couple of weeks ago a new and free Hotmail app client launched on the Android Marketplace.

Image via Microsoft

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Wow, speaking of Microsoft's distorted reality. 2 million users out of 270 million iOS users is :
0.74%. Such a huge success has never been seen before. It deserve an entry in Guinness World Records /s

I think what deserves an entry in the Guinness World Records is your ability to troll every single topic that mentions Microsoft.

alexalex said,
Wow, speaking of Microsoft's distorted reality. 2 million users out of 270 million iOS users is :
0.74%. Such a huge success has never been seen before. It deserve an entry in Guinness World Records /s

"since the launch of iOS 5 in October over 2 million people with iOS-based products have connected to Hotmail"

2 milion in one month... someone should learn to read.

count me in. The active sync exchange server is awesome. Mail are pushed instantly. You can even sync contacts and calendar. Thumb Up. Those who said otherwise is lame and know not thing. Remember, use can only fetch Gmail, not push. Only Hotmail can push. period

satus said,
count me in. The active sync exchange server is awesome. Mail are pushed instantly. You can even sync contacts and calendar. Thumb Up. Those who said otherwise is lame and know not thing. Remember, use can only fetch Gmail, not push. Only Hotmail can push. period

I've had my gmail pushed to iOS for years, as well as contacts and all my calendars. It supported it before Hotmail did in fact..

DomZ said,

I've had my gmail pushed to iOS for years, as well as contacts and all my calendars. It supported it before Hotmail did in fact..

You mean on iOS as a native Apple push notification specifically, right?

Hotmail and Live have supported push email and contact/calendar integration on smartphones going back to 2003. (This is before GMail existed.)

*Reference: Windows Mobile - Windows Smartphone - Windows PocketPC

Microsoft also provided these services to non-smartphones via SMS since around 2003 as well.

AFineFrenzy said,
Hotmail is old, slow and clunky.

The website is slow and clunky... it's a much better experience when it's connected to the Mail app on mobile devices.

leojei said,

The website is slow and clunky... it's a much better experience when it's connected to the Mail app on mobile devices.

The website is slow and clunky compared to what?

Have you used it in the last few years?

If you still found it slow, try using IE9 or other HTML5 compliant browser, and you will be hard to find a millisecond of difference where it is slower than any web email service, including GMail.

It's simple really, my HoTMaiL address is my oldest surviving email address, I had it before Microsoft bought the company and still use it. The fact that I now use an IOS device to access it is has no bearing.

Mark Thomas said,
Poor misguided fools.

Fanboy much?

Like desktop operating systems these days, which email provider users choose really doesn't matter anymore. Accessing mail through smartphones, tablets, and other clients (Digsby user here) basically makes EVERY inbox function 99% identically.

Sitting around acting like anybody is a fool for their choice of email provider just makes you look like you're living in the past. Other than people extremely dependent on Gmail's labeling system, nobody's day-to-day life is affected by their choice of email provider. So grow up.

Joshie said,

Fanboy much?

Like desktop operating systems these days, which email provider users choose really doesn't matter anymore. Accessing mail through smartphones, tablets, and other clients (Digsby user here) basically makes EVERY inbox function 99% identically.

Sitting around acting like anybody is a fool for their choice of email provider just makes you look like you're living in the past. Other than people extremely dependent on Gmail's labeling system, nobody's day-to-day life is affected by their choice of email provider. So grow up.

The awkward moment when Joshie calls someone a fanboy then goes on a huge rant defending the product in question.

AFineFrenzy said,

The awkward moment when Joshie calls someone a fanboy then goes on a huge rant defending the product in question.


What? What comment were you reading? Are you seeing imaginary posts that give you something to reply to with some strange deep well of snark desperate to burst out of you? My post blatantly encompasses ALL email providers, if you'd actually read it.

Or would you care to name which product it is I'm defending? Good luck, cuz I sure never did.

On iOS5, Gmail does not provide PUSH support. I can only check mails manually. While Hotmail does support PUSH. This is a huge factor which helps people to decide between the two. Whether the PUSH mail works correctly without draining iPhone battery is another funny question though.

sanke1 said,
On iOS5, Gmail does not provide PUSH support. I can only check mails manually. While Hotmail does support PUSH. This is a huge factor which helps people to decide between the two. Whether the PUSH mail works correctly without draining iPhone battery is another funny question though.

If you set up Gmail as 'Exchange' (ActiveSync) rather than 'Gmail' (IMAP), I believe that it does Push. I think that Apple made the 'Gmail' option use IMAP instead of Activesync to make it so Gmail didn't look that good.

sanke1 - said,

On iOS5, Gmail does not provide PUSH support. I can only check mails manually. While Hotmail does support PUSH. This is a huge factor which helps people to decide between the two. Whether the PUSH mail works correctly without draining iPhone battery is another funny question though..

Yes it does, investigate before you comment.

Mark Thomas said,

Yes it does, investigate before you comment.

I know that you have to set it up as Exchange account. But it was giving me too many problems where some of my emails disappeared. Emails not being pushed.

If you add your Gmail account details selecting Gmail option, THERE IS NO PUSH. Only FETCH or MANUAL.

There might be a bug in current version of iOS 5. But many of my friends switched over to Hotmail for this exact reason.

Google were the pioneers of email revolution but now they are lagging behind or at least Apple is showing them in poor light.

sanke1 said,

I know that you have to set it up as Exchange account. But it was giving me too many problems where some of my emails disappeared. Emails not being pushed.

If you add your Gmail account details selecting Gmail option, THERE IS NO PUSH. Only FETCH or MANUAL.

There might be a bug in current version of iOS 5. But many of my friends switched over to Hotmail for this exact reason.

Google were the pioneers of email revolution but now they are lagging behind or at least Apple is showing them in poor light.


That's weird... I set up Hotmail the same way (through Exchange) and not having problems with neither of them on iOS5... have you tried using Hotmail on Exchange and see if the same problem arise?

SK[ said,]MS actually added Push to Hotmail because its competitors (GMail) were offering it. A long time before MS I might add.

http://www.google.com/support/...bin/answer.py?answer=138740

However I do wish GMail would support syncing tasks.

Ya, Microsoft was just copying GMail, just like when they added this technology into Exchange back in 1995, using their crazy time travel machine so they could once again copy Google's GMail from 2006.

BTW What you are talking about isn't even close to being correct...


Microsoft began offering real-time e-mail notification with Windows Mobile 2003 (sending SMS messages when new mail arrive), then replaced it with a simulated push experience (long polling) in 2007

(And this is a horribly fact scrambled Wiki article, but it at least recognizes that Windows Phones were doing this crap before GMail and the iPhone existed.)

Really?

PS Do you work at Google, and if so, do they make you believe their version of reality?

I wonder how much of those users are accessing Hotmail from the Mail app and how much are using Safari. That's a statistic Microsoft should, but most probably wouldn't, publish.

Rolando said,
I wonder how much of those users are accessing Hotmail from the Mail app and how much are using Safari. That's a statistic Microsoft should, but most probably wouldn't, publish.

Why should they publish that? I fail to see what difference it really makes if they logged in in the browser or the mail app (well settings really)

Rolando said,
I wonder how much of those users are accessing Hotmail from the Mail app and how much are using Safari. That's a statistic Microsoft should, but most probably wouldn't, publish.

Considering they say the stats are because they can tell what clients are using ActiveSync, they're all using the mail app...

htcz said,
Active Sync really sucks on Android.

Im glad they put out a Android app for it...Much better.


Mail in general on Android sucks, the only app that works properly with push and all is the gmail one.

Leonick said,

Mail in general on Android sucks, the only app that works properly with push and all is the gmail one.

And even that gets quirky at times. I don't know if it's any better on tablets, but the number of taps necessary to move between labels is embarrassing.

And not helped by Android's flaky implementation of the Back function, which seems to unpredictably go between backing up within the same application and returning you to the home screen.

Leonick said,

Mail in general on Android sucks, the only app that works properly with push and all is the gmail one.

Actually I have no issues with my exchange. No sync Issues, mail comes on time. And the best part with my setup, I have Push turned on between M-F between 5AM-5PM. All other times I have the mail to check once during the day (they don't pay me enough to answer emails during off hours, lol).

Joshie said,

And not helped by Android's flaky implementation of the Back function, which seems to unpredictably go between backing up within the same application and returning you to the home screen.

It's not the button that is flaky, it's the user that is flaky.

When you have gone back enough within an application, naturally home is the logical next step. If you can't understand that, use an iOS. Apple designed it for people like you in mind.

UndergroundWire said,

It's not the button that is flaky, it's the user that is flaky.

When you have gone back enough within an application, naturally home is the logical next step. If you can't understand that, use an iOS. Apple designed it for people like you in mind.


LOL yeah okay, way to sound butt hurt, bro. Instead of even asking for a single example of back function flakiness, you jump straight into ad hominem attacks?

It's even more hilarious since this kind of butthurt defensiveness is typical when defending underdog platforms (like Linux/Opera/etc), but considering Android's success, you'd expect people to be more willing to look at their platform's flaws so they don't sneak up and hurt the product in the long run.

Anyone who's ever used the text messaging feature in Android has experienced, at least once, the weird way that pressing back while viewing a thread of messages will either take you back to the home screen (if you access the message from, say, the notification pane) or back to the SMS inbox (if you access it through the Messaging icon).

While I'm sure your mind immediately jumps to apologetics for that particular scenario, it's only one of several similar examples, so don't waste your keystrokes.

Joshie said,

Anyone who's ever used the text messaging feature in Android has experienced, at least once, the weird way that pressing back while viewing a thread of messages will either take you back to the home screen (if you access the message from, say, the notification pane) or back to the SMS inbox (if you access it through the Messaging icon).

I'm sure with that claim you can back it up, riiiight? I won't be expected any such source from you. Move along now.

UndergroundWire said,

I'm sure with that claim you can back it up, riiiight? I won't be expected any such source from you. Move along now.


What are you even talking about? Backing up a claim of a behavior that can be reproduced? What, do you want a link to an official bug report or something? Anyone can do a google search for "android back button" + problem/bug/hoopajoob and find hundreds of threads discussing a multitude of oddities for both users and coders. The exact problem I mentioned is a matter of the 'back vs. up' metaphor and is thoroughly described in a blog I found on page one of results from a google search:

http://ignorethecode.net/blog/...15/the_back_button_dilemma/

But no no, go on, your platform is PERFECT in every way, shape and form, and requires no further development whatsoever, because it's so completely perfect and 100% bug free, because somehow Google managed to hire the only developers in the history of programming who never needed to debug anything.

Leonick said,

Mail in general on Android sucks, the only app that works properly with push and all is the gmail one.

The Hotmail app for Android works great

UndergroundWire said,

That's why I use Gmail.

Ok, maybe this should be phrased more like:

The built in Email and Gmail clients in Android suck horribly. Dropping email, getting out of sync with simple IMAP and POP3 servers, along with problems with Exchange and Gmail servers as well.

When I finally moved to WP7 full time, I was kind of surprised that I could have 40,000 emails in my Live/Hotmail and other accounts (all downloaded) on my phone, and not have any issues or performance problems.

WP7 to date hasn't got out of Sync with any email server, failed to display an email, or hasn't crashed or locked up when dealing with a lot of email. (All which are common on Android.)


Show me an Android phone with 15,000 messages in the inbox, and I will show you FC, and a painfully slow experience. (Which is crazy, as Android doesn't even offer the ability to actually 'keep' this many messages on the phone.)

Sure this many emails is not common, but it isn't uncommon either, and even a few thousand emails, it was annoying to have Android get mucked up and then have it dump the entire inbox and redownload the messages.

Also it is nice to not have the 'limits' on the number of messages that you can keep on your phone with WP7.

Joshie said,
...

You are a frustrating person to talk to. Yes I'm looking for a "bug" report. Or maybe like I originally said, it is the user that is flaky that doesn't like how the back button works on Android. What you provided is an opinion article from some blog not a bug report.

Pathetic. STAY QUITE NOW!

thenetavenger said,

Ok, maybe this should be phrased more like:

The built in Email and Gmail clients in Android suck horribly. Dropping email, getting out of sync with simple IMAP and POP3 servers, along with problems with Exchange and Gmail servers as well.

When I finally moved to WP7 full time, I was kind of surprised that I could have 40,000 emails in my Live/Hotmail and other accounts (all downloaded) on my phone, and not have any issues or performance problems.

WP7 to date hasn't got out of Sync with any email server, failed to display an email, or hasn't crashed or locked up when dealing with a lot of email. (All which are common on Android.)


Show me an Android phone with 15,000 messages in the inbox, and I will show you FC, and a painfully slow experience. (Which is crazy, as Android doesn't even offer the ability to actually 'keep' this many messages on the phone.)

Sure this many emails is not common, but it isn't uncommon either, and even a few thousand emails, it was annoying to have Android get mucked up and then have it dump the entire inbox and redownload the messages.

Also it is nice to not have the 'limits' on the number of messages that you can keep on your phone with WP7.


???

Gmail and Email work great on my phone. No issues at all. Perhaps you should try to correct anything I said since it is my user experience.

What you really meant to say is, "Everything sucks about Android because it's not Windows Phone".

UndergroundWire said,


???

Gmail and Email work great on my phone. No issues at all. Perhaps you should try to correct anything I said since it is my user experience.

What you really meant to say is, "Everything sucks about Android because it's not Windows Phone".

You need to calm down. Android is the dominant smartphone platform; there's no need for butthurt. Once you've already succeeded in the market, I think it's okay to learn to accept criticism as a product.

Honestly I get the weird feeling that you would be completely unable to yourself levy any criticism toward Android. So far you've treated every comment as a personal attack, since your response has universally been personal attacks (and poorly spelled ones, at that).

So I challenge you to name two things you don't like about the Android OS. Two bugs at the raw Android level that you've encountered, or two features that you find unintuitive or inefficient. You seem like the kind of guy who wouldn't dare let someone else have the last word, so I'm pretty confident you'll respond to this with what appears to be your go-to attitude of misplaced superiority (Android isn't YOUR product, after all, so it's not like you can ever actually represent it). But perhaps you'll tack on an actual response to my challenge while you're at it.

If not, could I at least get you to assert what appears to be your belief that Android has no bugs? Just go ahead and say it: Google has made zero mistakes with Android.

Might as well round off how ridiculous you're sounding.

P.S. And while you're at it, the next time you get an email or a text message on your phone, click it from your notification drawer. Then hit Home. Go to your app drawer and launch the SMS or Email application directly after that. You'll notice Android takes you to the last view of the application (the message you were looking at). Now attempt to go 'back' to the inbox.

You can't. It'll take you back to the launcher. Because that's how the Back function behaves. In some apps, this tying down of the Back button actually makes it IMPOSSIBLE to get to the app's home screen without completely backing/exiting out of the app and relaunching it cleanly. This is awkward and unintuitive, and I really don't have to find you a bug report for easily reproduced behavior. In fact, your stubborn inability to acknowledge the behavior--or at least your stockholm syndromesque default to believing that however Android does it is how Android meant to do it and is therefore the best way to do--just makes me assume you're either too lazy to attempt it yourself, or don't actually own an Android handset in the first place and can't.

Demanding an actual bug report is completely obtuse of you, since I could very well easily FILE a bug report myself and link you to it. And that you would somehow consider a simple effort of reposting on my part more valid than linking to a third party is just plain illogical, and only serves to explain why I must so infuriate you.

Edited by Joshie, Nov 5 2011, 6:11am :

Joshie said,
.

I wanted to see a bug report of how long this "issue" has been. If you just filed it, I would have laughed at you for your pathertic attempt. The community would have made you look like a fool that you are because is this an Android issue? More on that later.

The issue you speak of doesn't exist. I've tried your stupid little method and I still don't see what you are talking about. After doing what you said to do, I went back to my Gmail message, hit back it took me back to my email.

NOW, if you want to be smart about if for once in your life, WHAT CUSTOM ROM are you using (if applicable)? WHAT CUSTOM LAUNCHER are you using (if applicable)? WHAT FRAMEWORK DOES YOUR PHONE USE (Sense, TouchWiz, MotoBlur, etc...)? Perhaps what you are using is buggy which is why it is not a "known" Android issues as you would believe.

Learn what is considered Android before you say it is an Android issue. Stock Android is fine (what you would find on a Nexus device). I have a thunderbolt running Sense 2.1. It has none of the bugs you speak of. PLEASE BE CLEAR ON WHAT YOU ARE USING!

I guarantee you you will find more support for your issues in the future if you know how to communicate your issue.

That's surprising. I would have thought GMail would be more popular because of the easy to use SMTP server they provide.

Ive always had trouble setting up Hotmail accounts on iPhones because of the SMTP server.

WarioTBH said,
That's surprising. I would have thought GMail would be more popular because of the easy to use SMTP server they provide.

Ive always had trouble setting up Hotmail accounts on iPhones because of the SMTP server.

+1

WarioTBH said,
That's surprising. I would have thought GMail would be more popular because of the easy to use SMTP server they provide.

Ive always had trouble setting up Hotmail accounts on iPhones because of the SMTP server.


Well I'm not really surprised, they are one of the biggest email providers, over here in sweden everyone has a Hotmail as Windows Live Messenger is the most popular IM.

Setting up isnt exactly hard, add account, click hotmail, sign in. Not sure what version hotmail was added in though...

GMail has it's own interesting version of a reality distortion field. I personally am a user and enjoy it for the most part, but it's nowhere near the most popular email service in terms of actual numbers (I believe Yahoo and Hotmail lead it to an embarrassing degree).

However, Gmail is fairly popular among the tech savvy and the IT community, who also tend to socialize among themselves, so they exist in this interesting bubble of Gmail users, giving them the impression that it's taking the world by storm.

Certainly it's growing its user-base, but it shouldn't really surprise anybody who pays attention to more than just tech blogs that it's not number one (or even number two).

WarioTBH said,
That's surprising. I would have thought GMail would be more popular because of the easy to use SMTP server they provide.

Ive always had trouble setting up Hotmail accounts on iPhones because of the SMTP server.

I had absolutely no problem setting both my Gmail and Hotmail account on my iPod Touch.

WarioTBH said,
That's surprising. I would have thought GMail would be more popular because of the easy to use SMTP server they provide.

Ive always had trouble setting up Hotmail accounts on iPhones because of the SMTP server.

Really SMTP server issues? There are a couple of things I know about, but there is also the problem with ISPs that block port 25 and require you to use their SMTP servers, which Hotmail lets you get around easily.

I wouldn't have guess GMail. Why would iPhone users choose a Google based service with the war with Apple? (Apple and Android/Google going head to head around the world.)

Also why would iPhone users choose an email service that admits to data mining the email, and also leaves it open to Google and Google employees?

Any Google engineer can run an SQL like query and pull up all your emails specifically, and read them directly, which is far more invasive than the statistical data mining that makes people already avoid GMail.

So if your company uses GMail and several employees email each other talking about investing in XYZ, Google uses and sells this information, even though it does cross a lot of lines and gray areas of legality and ethics.

I personally wouldn't care if Google read my emails on the evening news; however, I don't like the fact that they use my email to see what products are popular and invest in things based on culture trends and things I say in emails, that makes them more wealthy and gives them more information and political power.

Remember, Google's stand tot he US Govt about providing data wasn't about the ethics or providing the data, it was about providing it for free. Google likes to get paid for their information gathering, which a lot of governments do use and pay Google to get. Oh, and the US Govt did get access eventually, which Google swept under the media/news rugs rather quickly.

Microsoft BTW hasn't been as cooperative with the US or other governments, as they were able to demonstrate their data servers were double encrypted, and only had access to and only could provide encrypted chunks. Which takes a long long time to break into each user's encrypted chunk.