Lulzsec member who hacked Sony Pictures pleads guilty

Things just haven’t been going well for what’s left of Lulzsec. ‘Neuron,’ one of the hackers responsible for breaking into Sony Pictures’ website and stealing personal information on thousands of people, has just plead guilty before a Los Angeles Federal Court.

Neuron, who’s real name is Raynaldo Rivera (he also goes by royal and wildicv, if any of those ring a bell), said that he masked his IP address and hit Sony Pictures’ website with an SQL-injection attack, essentially flooding them with malicious code that breached their servers and allowed Lulzsec to make off with the supposedly secure information.  

Since he plead guilty, Rivera will get off relatively easy, with a maximum prison sentence of 5 years, plus a small $250,000 fine. That’s basically a slap on the wrist compared to what Rivera’s boss, Hector Monsegur – better known as Sabu – could be facing; even after giving up his former comrades to the Feds, Lulzsec’s fallen leader is still facing a maximum sentence of 124 years and six months in prison.

Source: Ars Technica | Image via FirstHackNews

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"That's basically a slap on the wrist compared to what Rivera's boss, Hector Monsegur - better known as Sabu - could be facing; even after giving up his former comrades to the Feds, Lulzsec's fallen leader is still facing a maximum sentence of 124 years and six months in prison."

Lol, that's typically the US... giving him a 124 years sentence.
Isn't 70 years or so enough?
(he's probably not gonna last for another 124 years anyway... might as well make it 10.000 years in that case)

DX3me said,
"That's basically a slap on the wrist compared to what Rivera's boss, Hector Monsegur - better known as Sabu - could be facing; even after giving up his former comrades to the Feds, Lulzsec's fallen leader is still facing a maximum sentence of 124 years and six months in prison."

Lol, that's typically the US... giving him a 124 years sentence.
Isn't 70 years or so enough?
(he's probably not gonna last for another 124 years anyway... might as well make it 10.000 years in that case)


Because in the US you get a penalty for each individual crime.
And they stack up so high, because on good behavior you can take off years. With these kind of jail times, good behavior aint gonna cut it

Shadowzz said,

Because in the US you get a penalty for each individual crime.
And they stack up so high, because on good behavior you can take off years. With these kind of jail times, good behavior aint gonna cut it

The rule of decreasing a sentence, due to good behaviour shouldn't exist in the first place.
As if the criminal offense you've been convicted for suddenly isn't as worse as it was before...

"Rivera will get off relatively easy, with a maximum prison sentence of 5 years, plus a small $250,000 fine."

Sarcasm right?

Tho, I seriously doubt any of them get any real jail time, rather some company is going to pick them up and make them work. It's not like anyone can do what they do, it's not just hitting the "Firing mah lazzzzorz" LOIC kinda thing anymore.

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
"Rivera will get off relatively easy, with a maximum prison sentence of 5 years, plus a small $250,000 fine."

Sarcasm right?

Tho, I seriously doubt any of them get any real jail time, rather some company is going to pick them up and make them work. It's not like anyone can do what they do, it's not just hitting the "Firing mah lazzzzorz" LOIC kinda thing anymore.

Sorry, but it's not 95 anymore, companies don't hire hackers anymore, when they can get more skilled people with actual ethics and morals from universities. and besides that, none of the lulzec people are actually very good hackers. they simply used tools anyone can use.

These are no Mitnick's

HawkMan said,

Sorry, but it's not 95 anymore, companies don't hire hackers anymore, when they can get more skilled people with actual ethics and morals from universities. and besides that, none of the lulzec people are actually very good hackers. they simply used tools anyone can use.

These are no Mitnick's

and they never will be

their actions did not just affect services but the lives of 1000's of people around the world. lets take away their privilege to use the internet for 5 years and fine them. instead of throwing them in jail where the will have a easy life with flat screen tvs /ps3's etc and better health care than those people who are struggling to make a living for them selves.

HawkMan said,

Sorry, but it's not 95 anymore, companies don't hire hackers anymore, when they can get more skilled people with actual ethics and morals from universities. and besides that, none of the lulzec people are actually very good hackers. they simply used tools anyone can use.

These are no Mitnick's

Common jealousy of hackers, if these things were so easy to "hack" with what you make it sound like a "Drag and drop" press to hack button every website on the planet would be compromised. Love them or hate them, these guys achieved something that no one else did and you can't take it away from them.

HawkMan said,

Sorry, but it's not 95 anymore, companies don't hire hackers anymore, when they can get more skilled people with actual ethics and morals from universities. and besides that, none of the lulzec people are actually very good hackers. they simply used tools anyone can use.

These are no Mitnick's


Lol what?

Hackers are still being employed.

GS:mac

ingramator said,

Common jealousy of hackers, if these things were so easy to "hack" with what you make it sound like a "Drag and drop" press to hack button every website on the planet would be compromised. Love them or hate them, these guys achieved something that no one else did and you can't take it away from them.

Not everyone lacks morals or want to deface and DDOS' websites.

If you think it's so very hard to do I suppose you look up certain payload delivery systems. it's not exactly drag and drop. but it's something anyone with a decent amount of computer knowledge can do, though it requires time and preparation to find what avenues of attack are open and then choosing the right payload and attack vector to perform the attack.

The hardest part is to do it undetected, which this guy failed pretty hard at. despite his attempted IP masking.

Glassed Silver said,

Lol what?

Hackers are still being employed.

GS:mac

oh really which ones. to be a hacker and employed today, you first have to be a lot better than these guys, and you have to not be a brat without ethics or morals. no one would hire anyone from Lulzec. And even Mitnick who's the most known hacker to have been given a security position (I believe he has his own company now) was in jail for a long time first, and then he had to be without computers and phones for a long time after that even.

Name me one High profile hacker that has been hired in the last 5 years.

HawkMan said,

oh really which ones. to be a hacker and employed today, you first have to be a lot better than these guys, and you have to not be a brat without ethics or morals. no one would hire anyone from Lulzec. And even Mitnick who's the most known hacker to have been given a security position (I believe he has his own company now) was in jail for a long time first, and then he had to be without computers and phones for a long time after that even.

Name me one High profile hacker that has been hired in the last 5 years.


geohot comes to mind

Also whitehat hackers who converted from a black or grey past.

Glassed Silver:mac

ingramator said,

Common jealousy of hackers, if these things were so easy to "hack" with what you make it sound like a "Drag and drop" press to hack button every website on the planet would be compromised. Love them or hate them, these guys achieved something that no one else did and you can't take it away from them.


SQL injection, which is what he pleaded guilty for, is not a hard feat. The only thing you need to do is to find a weak spot which would only exist in a site with bad code and inject your own code there.

A good hacker would be able to hack without using really old, well-documented methods like that.

And there is the question of morals and ethics - does a company really want to trust guys like these? Unlike the Geohot case, where the guy got hired, these guys did a lot of damage to a lot of people.

Glassed Silver said,

geohot comes to mind

Also whitehat hackers who converted from a black or grey past.

Glassed Silver:mac


Did you just call grotto a hacker :face palm:

Also what Whitehat hackers that converted. These don't admit to what they did in the past. And even if they did, they don't qualify, because again it would be more than 5 years back, and they have since spent time to show that they have indeed changed.