Lumia 710 gets official on US T-Mobile

The Nokia Lumia 800 has received a large amount of positive praise from different reviewers and online publications. The Lumia 710, like the Lumia 800, runs Windows Phone 7 as part of Nokia's alliance with Microsoft. Now, Nokia's own press site has revealed more about the well-hyped Lumia 710. The PDF can be downloaded here.

The Lumia 710 remains largely stock with the core Windows Phone 7 platform, since Microsoft has strictly enforced guidelines on their mobile OS. As part of their agreement though, Nokia has been able to include some additional apps with the phone as standard. These apps consist of Nokia Drive, the Weather Channel, ESPN, App Highlights, Netflix, T-Mobile TV, Slacker Radio, TeleNav GPS, and My Account.

The 710 marks the first Nokia-Microsoft handset to be sold in the United States but the device first appeared in October 2011. Since the Lumia range has already generated some positive responses, the 710 is likely going to be eagerly anticipated by fans of both Nokia and the WP7 platform. Fans of Nokia handsets will be able to pick up the Lumia 710, the phone considered to be an 'entry-level' option, from January 11th 2012.

While the Windows Phone 7 platform has been available in North America from the start with phones such as the LG Quantum, Nokia has chosen to wait it out until the new year before making the Lumia 710 available. As a benefit of this wait, the phone is surprisingly affordable for what it offers. The phone boasts a 1.4GHz Snapdragon processor, a 5MP camera with 720p video recording (at 30fps), a 3.7" ClearBlack display, and 512MB RAM alongside the 8GB of onboard storage.

Since it is only $50 on a T-Mobile value contract, the Lumia 710 appears to be an affordable route into the Windows Phone 7 smartphone world, on top of being able to appeal to more than just new smartphone buyers. The dent that it makes should stem from the affordable contracts and it could lead to WP7 making a bigger dent in the smartphone OS market in the United States. Since the US is still the top buyer of smartphones in the world, being able to make an impact is vital.

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Why on Earth would MS partner with T-Mobile (US)? They're not going to be around much longer and their coverage is abysmal. T-Mo is going to be either chewed up and spit out by AT&T, who will dissolve T-Mo's incompatible network--rendering these devices useless, or Dish Network will absorb T-Mo and dump the GSM network to focus on the high-bandwidth 4G network.

WindowsSlave said,
Why on Earth would MS partner with T-Mobile (US)? They're not going to be around much longer and their coverage is abysmal. T-Mo is going to be either chewed up and spit out by AT&T, who will dissolve T-Mo's incompatible network--rendering these devices useless, or Dish Network will absorb T-Mo and dump the GSM network to focus on the high-bandwidth 4G network.

The AT&T deal has been blocked so far and doesn't seem to be happening at this point though.

AT&T has pretty much given up. DirectTV is actively interested (and I suspect Sprint as well). DirectTV has been buying spectrum in wireless, trying to diversify out of just satellite TV service (they also bought Block Buster).

I got in every store I could get into near Ottawa and I couldn't see ANYTHING related to wp7. Bell, Rogers, Telus, Fido, Koodo, name it.

Advertising FAIL

(I'm in Canada)

Mouettus said,
I got in every store I could get into near Ottawa and I couldn't see ANYTHING related to wp7. Bell, Rogers, Telus, Fido, Koodo, name it.

Advertising FAIL

(I'm in Canada)

The carriers aren't doing their part either it seems, which is a shame.

GP007 said,

The carriers aren't doing their part either it seems, which is a shame.

It's not the carrier's responsibility to advertise Microsoft's products. Apple does it on their own, as do the Android handset makers (except those with carrier branding--which the carrier will advertise). If Microsoft wants to make any headway, they need to 1) start a meaningful and active advertising campaign, and 2) convince those of us who are well-invested in competing ecosystems that it's worth jumping-ship. To date, Microsoft has failed miserably on both.

WindowsSlave said,

It's not the carrier's responsibility to advertise Microsoft's products. Apple does it on their own, as do the Android handset makers (except those with carrier branding--which the carrier will advertise). If Microsoft wants to make any headway, they need to 1) start a meaningful and active advertising campaign, and 2) convince those of us who are well-invested in competing ecosystems that it's worth jumping-ship. To date, Microsoft has failed miserably on both.

Wait what? Why wouldn't the carrier want to advertise phones they already paid for from the OEMs in the first place IN THEIR OWN RETAIL STORES?!?!?!?

The phones DO have carrier branding, if you go into a AT&T shop you see AT&T branded phones. AT&T did just as much advertising, direct retail, also having their sales reps push iPhones and Android phones as hard as they can.

The carriers have just as much responsibility, and it's in their best interest infact, to sell phones they have on their networks.

By your logic someone like best buy wouldn't advertise what they have in their stores because best buy doesn't make the products themselves.

GP007 said,

The carriers aren't doing their part either it seems, which is a shame.


Why would they even give a damn about a platform with 1.5% marketshare?!?! They have limited retail space. Of course they are going to use it for, you know, phones that people actually are interested in and will buy.

JianBing5 said,

Why would they even give a damn about a platform with 1.5% marketshare?!?! They have limited retail space. Of course they are going to use it for, you know, phones that people actually are interested in and will buy.

*facepalm*

Sure, why would I want to sell something I just paid for, much better to let it sit on my shelves or in the back gathering dust, it's fine if I never make my money back on it. /s

You're not making any sense, you know this? There have also been a number of stories when people go into a carrier shop and ask for a windows phone specific only to be either met by ignorant people who know nothing about it or they try to get them to buy an iPhone (probably because the sales rep gets a nice payout for each of those he/she sells).

And these are phones, they're not TV's, washing machines or cars, they don't take up that much retail display space at all, lets be real here at least.

GP007 said,

*facepalm*

Sure, why would I want to sell something I just paid for, much better to let it sit on my shelves or in the back gathering dust, it's fine if I never make my money back on it. /s

You're not making any sense, you know this? There have also been a number of stories when people go into a carrier shop and ask for a windows phone specific only to be either met by ignorant people who know nothing about it or they try to get them to buy an iPhone (probably because the sales rep gets a nice payout for each of those he/she sells).

And these are phones, they're not TV's, washing machines or cars, they don't take up that much retail display space at all, lets be real here at least.


You're making the false assumption that they would have bought the products to sell in the first place. Clearly, they have not, or it would be on the shelves.

JianBing6 said,

You're making the false assumption that they would have bought the products to sell in the first place. Clearly, they have not, or it would be on the shelves.

Wow, there's no talking to you, you're clearly an 'expert'... We all must just be envisioning Windows Phones being on these networks... /sarcasm

JianBing6 said,

You're making the false assumption that they would have bought the products to sell in the first place. Clearly, they have not, or it would be on the shelves.

Look at product reviews. Look at customer reviews, people are just as happy with their Windows Phones as those with other phones. People openly express their love for their WPs, Microsoft said it themselves, while Google state that people don't love their Android phones (obviously their are some, but they aren't as apparent).

These carriers have no reason to not buy and sell these phones. Their lack of support should be heavily attributed to WP's terribly slow growth. OEMs as well.