RIAA: Client side filtering to stop piracy via encryption

As if an ISP filtering what content gets to you wasn't enough, Cary Sherman of the infamous RIAA says that the only way to really defeat piracy is via a client-side monitoring service, much like an anti-virus client, except more like spyware. He says that the current problem that ISPs are facing with server-side filtering is encrypted content, which can be read only by the server it comes from, and the client receiving it. So, his solution is to wait until the content is decrypted, after it reaches the client.

Even he realizes some of the issues here: just why would a potential pirate want this software monitoring their actions? The answer is pretty obvious: they wouldn't. But he suggests that if users were simply notified that what they were doing was illegal, they might just stop. He also thinks that ISPs could start including the filter on the modems they ship to their customers.

Thanks to neufuse for pointing this out to us on the back page.
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just add this to your antivirus Trojan.RIAA.Sucks.k ir order for it to detect it and delete it forever.

what a good laugh it was to read about this one. RIAA is really loosing ground when their "great" ideas to stop piracy.

i love how RIAA supporters/employs and anybody whos for filtering/rescriction of other peoples rights alwase brings up ChilePrOn as an excuse, honestly, the riaa do make $ off psudo child prOn, as stated they put cute grrls in skimpy cloths and have them do things in a way that implys sex, then sell it........

CP is a problem but not on the p2p networks the RIAA is after, sexual preditorys use diffrent networks/methods to share their FILTH, because torrents/emule/g1/g2 networks are far to easy to monotor and track, ask cops who are acctualy after sexual preditors, they dont find very much to go after people for on the common networks, you gotta know where to look and be a truely sick ****er to go looking for it, i dont have any of the network/app names used, but even if i did i wouldnt post them, the cop i was talking to just told me that its VERY rare they find cp on bt or the other common networkes used to share files, and most of the cp thats found on torrents is reported very quickly by the site host and/or torrenters themselves, and many times they ask the site to leave them up for a while so they can catch perverted ****ers who download the filth.

other networks that are more secure/cost $ to join are riddled with the stuff, and this is where law enforcement spend the bulk of their time.

blah, this wont happen, if it did ISP's would loose to many clients, i dont know many people who would want to be FORCED to install software thats designed to slow their system and net down as well as monotor all they do and block anything that the riaa/mpaa find possably illegal......even my father whos an internet MORON wouldnt go for it, he would just go back to only using the net when hes at his office.

I can't say that I am too worried about the RIAA pushing out client-side software, it can't possibly be legal.
Even if they could legally enforce some sort of client-side software (which is doubtful), their is always some way to reverse engineer the software.

And what about the *nix (and OSX) users? Are they really going to spend the money to support every OS?
What happens when someone formats a computer?

This seems like too much work to enforce anything for the idea to be practical...

Face it, the RIAA is loosing money, and failing at what they are trying to do.
Now they are just resorting to scare tactics...

If the RIAA would stop producing ****ting music and signing anyone that can sing, then more people would buy CDs. I used to buy a lot of music CDs but then everything started to become crap and sound the same.

RIAA is just all butt hurt because all the ways they try to stop piracy have been failing. They wont stop it and may as well save their $$$ to apply to their asses to make them feel better.

Ahhhhhhhhhhhh just what we need on a Friday, a good laugh!

"he suggests that if users were simply notified that what they were doing was illegal, they might just stop"

Ummm no. The vast majority of pirates know that they are committing crimes. Some try to justify it or make excuses for it but most of them know it's illegal but do it anyway. Passing on this "knowledge" won't change anything.

The solution is not to spread knowledge that is already there but to defeat the ill-conceived attitude of entitlement.

Pirates know they are stealing and are ok with stealing. They do it online because they can get away with it.

Sheesh!

Hope they keep all that low quality dope they're doing to themselves. Sure wouldn't want them SHARING that with anyone!! Obviously, it's called Dumb Dope, that they're doing!!

Yeah right, as if I'll let them do that... :rolleyes:

The only good news here is that the RIAA apparently has no clue on how to efficiently stop encrypted P2P.

I'd like to see them try to install this on my PC. Like anyone would willingly put this on their computers.

Okay, let me see if I get this straight...

So the same guys who have repeatedly prosecuted innocents thru their baseless "John Doe" suits think they're enough of an authority to have THEIR OWN monitoring software installed on everyone's PC?

Didn't they prove they couldn't handle something as simplistic as a simple investigation? What makes them think they could handle proper and accurate monitoring of millions of workstations??? Am I missing something here?

The more it goes on, the more credibility they lose. They can't even be considered as a serious threat to freedom now. I mean come on!

He also thinks that ISPs could start including the filter on the modems they ship to their customers

many lulz!!!.

Encryption based p2p are "program by program" encrypted and not hardware based, so monitoring a illegal file can be done after the client program will take the file.

Uh... Is this even legal? I mean, isn't there some sort of right to privacy with what is on my computer? Unless I optionally install it, which I certainly wouldn't (and I couldn't think of any sane person that would willingly install something with the possibility to incriminate them).

Since when did the RIAA buy me MY computers and internet access for me ?.

Til they do that, they can go rubberneck themselves.

With these actions ?what is then your privacy? you don't have any!
RIAA needs to stop trying to control people's internet connection. Freedom is very important! If RIAA tries to control my Internet I will go to the judge to reclame my freedom!!!!!

How are they going to know the difference between a cd that i have ripped to mp3 and an mp3 that has been downloaded???
Oh wait! We can't rip cd's now?!

There's also some talk of putting the filtering tech into "applications" such as P2P apps
And who the hell is going to use those apps?!

"He also thinks that ISPs could start including the filter on the modems they ship to their customers."

Yeh, that'll happen. We'll have the "universal IM" protocol first. ha But seriously, sounds too expensive to implement anyway.

"He also thinks that ISPs could start including the filter on the modems they ship to their customers."

Just how is filtering at the modem level any different than filtering by the ISP? It's the computer than decrypts the content. :confused:

Jeesh, what a bunch of idiots.

I have a better idea. I would gladly install a piece of software that monitored my music PLAYING habits (who gives a crap if you download a song but never listen to it?) and sent a penny or two every time I listen to a song...

TO THE ARTISTS WHO WROTE AND PERFORMED IT!

...instead of the studio monopoly carpet baggers who are giving them four per cent or less of their OWN WORK.

F**k the RIAA.

(excalpius said @ #22)
I have a better idea. I would gladly install a piece of software that monitored my music PLAYING habits (who gives a crap if you download a song but never listen to it?) and sent a penny or two every time I listen to a song...

TO THE ARTISTS WHO WROTE AND PERFORMED IT!

...instead of the studio monopoly carpet baggers who are giving them four per cent or less of their OWN WORK.

F**k the RIAA.

Artists don't own the rights to their own work, silly.... the RIAA does (sadly, thats pretty much the truth)

hahahahahha RIAA is just funny. Im glad to be in canada, where i can just sit and laugh at companys like this. Fight on US brothers!

lol...I might move..US is getting weirder for me day by day with these stupid thoughts (they are thoughts now..could be enforced soon..who knows..)

I can't see it even working on the modem-- after all, the modem is frequently just plugged into a router, so it wouldn't be reading decrypted packets.

They'd need it in the NIC drivers, which means a run on them old 10/100 PCI cards they can't giveaway at computer graveyards.

(whocares78 said @ #17.1)
the nic doesnt do the decryption either.... its all done by the PC processor.

Wrong too, it is decrypted by a software, processing everything with the CPU.

what are they goign to do ask everyone to install some software on their computers, i cant see a lot of people doign this, if they install it dsecretly then you have privacy laws and such, not to mentin i am sure the hackers will work out how to disable it pretty damn quickly.. make it part of the OS.. once again hackers bypass it...

the solution to piracy is make sh&^ cheaper

once again people with NO idea on how computers even work trying to control the world....

I will NOT buy any modem that contains that piece of crap malware. It's called encryption for a reason and it defeats the purpose if I have a monitoring services running after my content is decrypted kthxbye

I'm pretty sure the programmers over at McAffe and Norton and all the other virus scanners will be putting this client side filtering app onto their list to remove. I'm sure we have some anti-RIAA supporters there and I'm sure they could find a way to get it in.

If not, I'll write my own damn anti-virus program and I'll call it "RIAA Virus Cleaner". Also, I'll launch botnets using the program against the RIAA. You can suxxors my balls RIAA

the modem doesnt do the decryption the computer does, it is still encrypted going through the modem, so no idea how they think a modem can do anything this will not work.

(whocares78 said @ #15.1)
the modem doesnt do the decryption the computer does, it is still encrypted going through the modem, so no idea how they think a modem can do anything this will not work.

You know, after all these other comments, yours is the first to point out this very valid issue.

Also, it begs the point that *IF* the RIAA was able to get a monitoring tool into my computer, what would keep them from stealing information from my system? (ie: Source code, documents, other private and legally owned/created content)

I agree that musicans and other artists deserve to be paid for their work, however the process that the RIAA is going about this is neither going to be effective nor are they doing this to get the musicians more money. In fact a recent report stated that the RIAA wanted to lower artist royalties.

Sad.

Have a great weekend gang.

Peace,
James Rose
New York City

Good luck trying to get that crap on my pc. I don't see how putting monitoring software on your modem would matter, as it's still getting encrypted results that only your pc can decrypt.

(Citrusleak said @ #13)
Good luck trying to get that crap on my pc. I don't see how putting monitoring software on your modem would matter, as it's still getting encrypted results that only your pc can decrypt.

Exactly.

This guy's an idiot. The same data coming through the modem would obviously be coming through the ISP's network. If the ISP can't detect (decrypt) the data, what's the modem going to do?

I thought of that while I was writing this article, and knew it was wrong. Should've mentioned that in there, to be honest, but I overlooked it when I was rereading before the publish.

RIAA Moron said:
He thinks that ISPs could start including the filter on the modems they ship to their customers.

What this guy thinks is of no consequence to anyone. Which ISPs would start planting spyware on their customers' equipment or software for no good reason? Ones with a death wish?

I think people should start giving me new Ferraris and beach houses around the world. So what? Why this garbage even qualifies as a story to be posted on Neowin is a mystery to me.

Do you see a discussion going on here? It's interesting. It may not be news of incredible consequence, but news about the RIAA fascinates people. And if ISPs do go along with this program, we'd all be kicking ourselves for not knowing it in the first place. This article just adds a little something to an otherwise slow news day.

(simon360 said @ #12.1)
And if ISPs do go along with this program, we'd all be kicking ourselves for not knowing it in the first place.

Oh c'mon! I was born at night, but not last night!

You know damned well that no ISPs would go along with such a stupid notion without major legislation being enacted forcing them to do so -- which would in turn trigger numerous and massive court challenges to stop such an unwarranted attempt at invading everyone's privacy. The notion that something like this could happen in the dark of night without anyone knowing about it is absurd.

(simon360 said @ #12.1)
This article just adds a little something to an otherwise slow news day.

You can spin this any way you want, but the reality is that you are once again engaging in yellow journalism. You know that the mere mention of the RIAA makes people's blood boil and you've posted this non-story not to inform, but to enrage.

Well congratulations! You've once again succeeded admirably. :mad:

The RIAA is just another terrorist organization, they should all be sent too Camp Gitmo!

I really think these guys must be smoking some seriously good crack to come up with these ideas it's long over due that we the people and customers boycott all RIAA artists, STOP PURCHASING CD's & DVD's from any recording artist and/or their record label is a member of the RIAA.

This list can be found at

http://www.riaa.com/aboutus.php?content_se...aboutus_members

also more info on how bad the RIAA is for America and the world.

http://www.riaaradar.com

I think the best option here is to install a user-side filter on Cary Sherman's mouth, so we don't have to listen to this pie-in-the-sky drivel anymore that completely undermines personal privacy - irrespective of illegal downloads existing on a computer or not.

Client-side monitoring service?! Like hell they are putting some nazi crap on my PC to watch what I download.

"..notified that what they were doing was illegal.."
Where I live, downloading is LEGAL. Be it software, music or movies.

SO.. F*CK YOU RIAA!

who cares? i just won't install "RIAA Antivirus"

they could potentially get companies like Symantec or McAfee to incorporate this into their anti-virus software, but i'm 100% sure that regardless of what happens, there will always be antivirus software available that doesn't contain this.

(milesfromordinary said @ #5)
they could potentially get companies like Symantec or McAfee to incorporate this into their anti-virus software,

Hmm, K.

i don't think that it's that ridiculous to say they could do that.

but my point was that no matter who they get to incorporate their software, there will always be somebody providing an alternative. because there will always be a demand for one.

(milesfromordinary said @ #5)
they could potentially get companies like Symantec or McAfee to incorporate this into their anti-virus software,

1. No one uses Symantec's AntiVirus.
2. McAfee would lose a lot of customers if they put it into their software.

(But I guess Mac and Linux/Unix users will be fine)

(Xocide said @ #5.4)
1. No one uses Symantec's AntiVirus.
2. McAfee would lose a lot of customers if they put it into their software.

Pfft so true lmao.

you got that right ... this is a non issue.

i aint even worried about it.... cause theres pretty much NO CHANCE that they could force people to install software like that

(ThaCrip said @ #4.1)
cause theres pretty much NO CHANCE that they could force people to install software like that ;)

Yeah. But I'm still surprised they have the nerve to bring this up...

sorry RIAA, you will not control the internet
i am free to do what ever i want there, and no one will stop me

legal or otherwise

and its people like you that are giving the RIAA the rationale to do what they do.

if people can't be responsible with their use of the internet and follow laws, then i am supportive of moves to crack down on those people.

(milesfromordinary said @ #1.1)
and its people like you that are giving the RIAA the rationale to do what they do.

if people can't be responsible with their use of the internet and follow laws, then i am supportive of moves to crack down on those people.

Don't be a sheep. There's nothing wrong with freedom.

(milesfromordinary said @ #1.1)
and its people like you that are giving the RIAA the rationale to do what they do.

if people can't be responsible with their use of the internet and follow laws, then i am supportive of moves to crack down on those people.

they are a business. all they care about is money. downloading songs is NOT illegal, it is infact LEGAL in a lot of countries. it doesn't matter what it is, they will always keep trying to find ways to make more and more money. this is just the latest excuse

and if my country wants to keep limiting what i can do on the internet, creating more and more restictions with the taxes that i pay every year, then yea i'm gana start breaking laws

ISPs could start including the filter on the modems they ship to their customers.

Lets put chips on our speakers and screens, so that they only playback music and videos legaly bought. Oh, and if you try to play pirated material, they will send a signal to a chip on your toilet paper, so that it ignites itself when used.

Someone should tell RIAA people to start doing stand-up comedy. They really make people laugh

(Turge said @ #1.2)

Don't be a sheep. There's nothing wrong with freedom.

uhm. are you really arguing that laws restricting internet use are "against freedom"? you're right, the world would be a better place with child porn freely available.

come on. its like saying that robbery should be legal because it doesn't always physically harm someone. (and in the case of child porn, it does.)

(milesfromordinary said @ #1.1)
and its people like you that are giving the RIAA the rationale to do what they do.

if people can't be responsible with their use of the internet and follow laws, then i am supportive of moves to crack down on those people.

Yes and i'm pretty sure you bought all the mp3 files on your computer, and all the software on it. I'm yet to know anyone who doesn't pirate something at least once in his life.

(milesfromordinary said @ #1.5)

uhm. are you really arguing that laws restricting internet use are "against freedom"? you're right, the world would be a better place with child porn freely available.

come on. its like saying that robbery should be legal because it doesn't always physically harm someone. (and in the case of child porn, it does.)

WOW. You just compared child porn to music piracy. I don't have the words....

::facepalm::

(milesfromordinary said @ #1.5)

uhm. are you really arguing that laws restricting internet use are "against freedom"? you're right, the world would be a better place with child porn freely available.

come on. its like saying that robbery should be legal because it doesn't always physically harm someone. (and in the case of child porn, it does.)

You must think pretty highly of the RIAA with all the work they're doing to combat child pornography. They must have a hidden agenda.

Someone says the RIAA will never control the Internet and you want him to be quiet because he gives them a reason to try and control it. You think DRM or any device/software preventing you to accomplish something on the Internet is not about freedom? Quit rolling over and taking it.

(milesfromordinary said @ #1.5)
uhm. are you really arguing that laws restricting internet use are "against freedom"? you're right, the world would be a better place with child porn freely available.

come on. its like saying that robbery should be legal because it doesn't always physically harm someone. (and in the case of child porn, it does.)

It's funny that you mention it, since many of the resources obtained from RIAA are from a pseudo child pron, think on Britney Spears.. they was really cruel, they obtained money from their image of teen-and-sexy, truly she obtained money from it, also drugs, she was only a use and toss product.

(milesfromordinary said @ #1.1)
and its people like you that are giving the RIAA the rationale to do what they do.

if people can't be responsible with their use of the internet and follow laws, then i am supportive of moves to crack down on those people.

^^RIAA staff

"i am free to do what ever i want there, and no one will stop me

legal or otherwise"

Seriously, are you ten? Laws are in place for a reason. You break it there will be consequences. Go rob a convenience store and see what the cops do when you say "I am free to do whatever I want, you can't stop me".

After they laugh in your face they will read you your rights. You will be shocked to discover you can't just do whatever you want, online or offline.

(milesfromordinary said @ #1.1)
and its people like you that are giving the RIAA the rationale to do what they do.

if people can't be responsible with their use of the internet and follow laws, then i am supportive of moves to crack down on those people.

I couldn't agree more! Computers can be used to do illegal things and they should be monitored by the good people at the RIAA.

Also, do you know how many drunk drivers are out there! Every car should have a breathalyser so people can't get drunk and drive! Oh what about drug use . . . Drug analyzers too!

Guns . . . need chips in them to keep people from doing bad things with them too. . . Oh wait include knives, baseball bats, rocks, rope, . . . . ?????

Wait . . . may be we should target criminals and not consider everyone a criminal in the first place . . .

Just because something can be used for something bad doesn't mean that the majority of people will use it that way. Is it wrong to download music illegally yeah. Should some Joe or Jill Smith be charged $9,000 per song because it was made available? HELL NO. The RIAA should pull their collective heads out of their @ss and get a clue about how things work today and develop a new way to sell there product, most of which is sh*t these days.

(C_Guy said @ #1.11)
Laws are in place for a reason.

They are. But in some cases, this being an example of one, the laws were created at a different time, and are thus outdated. When the majority of copyright laws were written, people did not even conceive of the internet in its current form. This is the reason judges and courts exist-- to interpret laws. However, when the legal climate changes as much as it has in recent years with regards to music, the legal system (which is cumbersome and slow even at its best) can take a very long time to realize that laws need to be changed.

The RIAA is reacting to this change in the music industry. They see their CD sales drop, and panic. I personally think that, while I certainly don't have a good solution to this problem, neither do they. I do think that they need to change their attitude towards internet music drastically before a solution that most people can agree upon is reached. Yes, if you break the laws there will certainly be consequences, but that doesn't necessarily mean the laws are right.

(C_Guy said @ #1.11)
"i am free to do what ever i want there, and no one will stop me

legal or otherwise"

Seriously, are you ten? Laws are in place for a reason. You break it there will be consequences. Go rob a convenience store and see what the cops do when you say "I am free to do whatever I want, you can't stop me".

After they laugh in your face they will read you your rights. You will be shocked to discover you can't just do whatever you want, online or offline.

Robbing a convenience store is nothing like mutually sharing a digital copy with someone, please drop this ridiculously idiotic and false analogy already; it's really getting old.

By the way, you are free to do whatever you want; whether it's downloading, robbing or killing but there are consequences for all actions. That includes both sides of the fence.