Google Updates Chrome EULA

As we mentioned earlier, Google's Chrome browser, though much hailed for its speed, does have its fair share of rust stains, including a EULA which originally gave Google complete control over all content submitted through the browser. In this case, slightly worrying would be an understatement.

Fortunately, the search engine has been quick to rectify this issue, attributing the whole issue to accidental copy and paste. Under Section 11 of Google's Universal Terms of Service, Google retains a license to transmit or display content through its services, as per US copyright law. However, the section in Chrome was not updated. Mike Yang, Senior Product Counsel at Google, writes: "[Our] license is limited to providing the service. In Gmail, for example, the terms specifically disclaim our ownership right to Gmail content. So for Google Chrome, only the first sentence of Section 11 should have applied. We're sorry we overlooked this, but we've fixed it now..."

The updated EULA now reads: "You retain copyright and any other rights you already hold in Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services." And, yes, these terms are retroactive.

Thanks for the tip, CaptainSlow!

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

ChrisTV Online! 3.05

Next Story

Sony recalls 440,000 Vaio laptops

14 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

I checked out the EULA for Picasa. Same thing there as well. Hopefully they will fix that as well as they have no right to my photographs as well.

Come on guys, get real. A massive company like Google don't just cut and paste license agreements into their software like some nickel and dime software start up, these things are pawed over by highly paid lawyers. Google's multi-billion dollar business (model ) is all about gathering information, purely to target advertising.

I recommend everyone test out a bit of freeware called Privoxy (not greatest software but the right price), it allows you to view exactly what your browser is loading, when you click on a web page. Privoxy is a proxy server (software ), and can be set up on the localhost (install Privoxy, and then configure browser proxy settings to localhost: 8118 ). Privoxy logs real time every request. Just watch all the tentacles going back to Google and Double Click etc. Also do a search for "hosts +file +mvps" (another free-bee ).

It's the way of the developers.
I'll usually copy and paste my previous project's license agreements to my new projects. Until someone notices it and give me a new one.

hahaha...well at least they were quick to react. One day turn around, that's pretty good. So was that EULA AutoUpdated by their services?

Does anyone really think a monopoly company the size of Google would make a junior mistake like that? Their attorneys probably have attorneys.

Just because they have attorneys doesn't keep their developers from "copy, paste, publish!" on some EULA that not even themselves had read.

Dunno about you, but I live in a country that regularly "loses" our personal data, most commonly by leaving it on trains, or posting it with "Please do not steal this really important data" on it.

So yes, mistakes like this, and worse, do happen. Regularly.

(zoonyx said @ #2.2)
Dunno about you, but I live in a country that regularly "loses" our personal data, most commonly by leaving it on trains, or posting it with "Please do not steal this really important data" on it.

So yes, mistakes like this, and worse, do happen. Regularly.


sounds like you live in new zealand