IE8, and why it's almost my default browser

Microsoft recently released Internet Explorer 8, and while I find that it is a great piece of software, it had a few shortcomings which left Google Chrome untouched with respects to my default browser selection.

There is absolutely no doubt that IE8 is better than IE7, its predecessor. It is faster, more robust and certainly more stable. There are also some great new features; I am quite fond of IE8's Web Slices. I utilized a web slice for Digg's top stories and to observe some stock quotes and I found it seamless and quite enjoyable.

The private browsing feature is a given, and not because I am a 'sex-obsessed life-deprived banana stroker' but because there certainly are non-porn related situations where the feature is useful.

I also must applaud the integration of Internet Explorer with Windows Vista, from quick e-mail access to system-wide integrated RSS feeds; it certainly creates a seamless user experience.

With that said, however, I seem to be plagued with an issue when opening IE8 and opening tabs. Even with my new tab page set to "Blank Page", I encounter a delay of 3-4 seconds prior to the opening of said tab. I experience this delay in no other browser but IE8, and strangely enough only on my 64-Bit system (After following the instructions suggested here this issue is now resolved).

Also, Internet Explorer 8 certainly falls short in regards to javascript when compared with Chrome. A prime example of this being http://chromeexperiments.com.

Google Chrome, on the other hand, lacks Web Slices and there is not as much integration as IE8 (though aesthetically, it's beautiful).

In terms of speed, Chrome opens quicker and I do not experience a 'tab delay' problem. With regard to actual browsing speed, both browsers seem to be roughly in the same area. Certainly there are websites which load quicker on Chrome, but the same is true for IE8 as well.

In short, I can safely say that the reason why IE8 has not secured the position of default browser on my machine is due in large part to the slight delay I experience throughout using the software (which may be a localized problem, certainly), and its javascript inferiority to Google Chrome.

What is important here, is not that Google Chrome holds the default position on my computer, but that IE8 falls short for very few reasons. No longer do we associate IE8 with the issues that plagued its predecessors. Given the direction in which Microsoft seems to be moving, I think we can certainly remain optimistic about the future.

Until then, I'll dabble in Internet Explorer 8 occasionally while remaining faithful to my flavour of the week: Google Chrome.

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IE 8. I would use it if:
- It didn't make my Explorer windows open a new window for each new folder I open.
. . . Changing this in the options and the registry yields no effect. Uninstalling IE 8 fixes it.
- Some of the menus have options grayed out yet I can access those very options in other menus.
. . . An example would be the inability to change my toolbars via the view menu yet I can change them via the tools menu on the command bar. WTF?
- Right-click context menus no longer appear on toolbars and buttons.
. . . They only appear on the title bar and contents. WTF?

I have no idea what is causing these bugs and nobody else seems to have these issues.

Quite incorrect, certainly faster and more stable than current firefox and a lot of features from chrome were in IE8 alpha first.

Perhaps I should have clarified what I meant about speed, which is start up time and app responsiveness for me, which is second only to chrome out of what I have used so far.

Steven77 said,
No really why are they like that.

It's probably the April/All Fools' Day joke, though I can't imagine why since the current date is still 2009-03-31, assuming UTC is being used. Of course, it's already 2009-04-01 for many people (Australia for example), and it will actually be 20090401T000000Z soon enough.

lammmetak said,
I would install safari 4 altough it runs better on a mac if u ask me.

Of course it runs better on a Mac... Safari was never meant to run on Windows in the first place, but a decision was made to port it, I guess... In the meantime, if I need a Webkit browser on Windows, I'll just play with Konqueror. :)

Hmm... I wonder if Konqueror runs reasonably well in coLinux...

IE8 works fast on my Vista 32 bit with Norton Internet Security 2009 and PrevX Edge 3.0 security apps running. No delays when opening tabs.

I like IE8 and use it for most of my browsing, but I have to admit that Chrome is the best all around and fastest browser out there today. Only thing that's stopping me from migrating to Chrome 100% is its weak Windows media player integration when viewing movies. It doesn't use your Media Player view settings, and if you do change them in the plug-in it reverts back to the defaults when you restart Chrome. In other words I can't view Pr0n at 200% scale

I only experience a delay when I open a blank tab for the first time. After that, it's pretty much instantaneous. The only thing that prevents me from using IE8 is the lack of a rudimentary download manager. I can't even queue files that I want downloaded.

For example, I want to download three 200MB files off a website. In Firefox, I could quickly download them all one after the other (provided the files are in queue). In IE8, I'm forced to download the files simultaneously. It's a minor problem, I understand. I could just as easily wait for one file to download then go to the next. But, it's a real nuisance when you're short on time.

As far as I'm aware, that's the only thing that prevents me from switching over to IE8. I've yet to try Google Chrome. Isn't it still in beta? Its user interface doesn't fit in that well with Windows Vista's Aero theme.

Actually Chrome on Vista looks really beautiful, with their use of Aero Glass. Features are keeping me from making it my full time browser though. IE8 is fitting in nicely right now.

Same. Chrome's UI elegant and simple, so much so that Safari 4 beta copied a lot of aspects of its UI. But how Chrome handles tab management is better than Safari 4, plus the titlebar area looks glitched up under Windows 7 for Safari 4.

I like IE8 but for one thing, it made my desktop wallpaper unchangeable unless I rebooted. At first I couldn't figure it out. I went and did a clean reinstall of XP64 and reinstalled all my drivers and programs one at a time until I duplicated the desktop quirk. Yes, IE8 was the culprit. My guess is in IE7 the browser is fully integrated into the OS and that with IE8 it's an option. Because of this, when I downloaded and installed IE8, it somehow ripped out some needed elements in IE7 that was somehow connected with desktop management. Will give it another shot, though.

postoasted said,
I like IE8 but for one thing, it made my desktop wallpaper unchangeable unless I rebooted. At first I couldn't figure it out. I went and did a clean reinstall of XP64 and reinstalled all my drivers and programs one at a time until I duplicated the desktop quirk. Yes, IE8 was the culprit. My guess is in IE7 the browser is fully integrated into the OS and that with IE8 it's an option. Because of this, when I downloaded and installed IE8, it somehow ripped out some needed elements in IE7 that was somehow connected with desktop management. Will give it another shot, though.

That would annoy me to no end. Then again, XP64 has never earned anybody's favour really... Driver issues (probably due to the fact that 64-bit was still new back then), applications crashing all over (probably due to the aforementioned driver issues) and now this. As much as I love 64-bit, I'd say go back to a flavour of XP 32-bit or move to Vista (32-bit or 64-bit) if you can...XP64 seems like it just isn't worth it!

I'm honestly impressed with the way Internet Explorer 8 has turned out. I use it in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008.

IE8 is very slow on my system, IE7 was much faster. Chrome is slower then IE7 but a little faster than IE8.
My system is pretty old , p4 2.8, 2gb of ram.

C_Guy said,
And IE. It is a godsend for the Mac though.

The last Mac I touched was a PowerPC back in grade school, so I'm obviously not an avid Mac user; please forgive me if this seems to be a stupid question: What about Safari, Camino, Shiira, iCab, and any others I might have missed that are free to download and use?

Don't know what he's running IE8 on, as I didn't read the entire story, as I couldn't get past the part where he says IE8 is faster and more stable than IE7?

I've tried IE8 on 3 of my machines now. It crashed all 3 times the first time I opened it. Crashed MANY, MANY more times within the first hour of use.

Has been removed from all 3 machines and WILL NOT be reinstalled any time soon!

Another fine POS from MS!!

I still prefer IE6 over both of the last 2 junk versions MS has pushed out. At least it can remember my username at sites I want it to!

Thank goodnes for Seamonkey, K-Meleon, and SRWare Iron!!

I don't mean any offense to you, but when I hear things like this it makes me question the person's technical savvyness. I've installed IE8 on clean installs of XP/Vista and on 1-2 year old builds at home and at work with no crashes, problems, etc.

Dont have any issues at all with IE8.

Read up top about tab delay and Chrome Experiments, under IE8 works great for me. (WinXP SP2)

Also have installed on flatmates computer and not a problem either.

Java is up to date and so runs like a dream.

I didnt like IE7 at all, but this i swapped from IE6 to IE8

Hi

Take a look at this site and try the tweak.
http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=754

From a Command Prompt window, run the following command:

regsvr32 actxprxy.dll

That re-registers the ActiveX Interface Marshaling Library, an obscure DLL that most people (even Microsoft experts) had never heard about. (Update: 27-Mar: Note that if you try this using Windows Vista, you must do this from an elevated Command Prompt window; type cmd in the Start menu Search box, right-click the Cmd.exe shortcut, and then choose Run As Administrator. For detailed instructions with screen shots, see this post.) After restarting her computer, she tried using IE8 again. The results were stunning:

Also, Internet Explorer 8 certainly falls short in regards to javascript when compared with Chrome. A prime example of this being http://chromeexperiments.com.

but what's the point, none of them has any real world usage. That's what I don't get in the whole my javascript engine is faster race, in real world usage, the difference is so small that it is not noticable.

That said, i would love it if the next version of IE had better dom support, altough since I started using javascript frameworks like extjs I care a bit less

XerXis said,
but what's the point, none of them has any real world usage. That's what I don't get in the whole my javascript engine is faster race, in real world usage, the difference is so small that it is not noticable.

That said, i would love it if the next version of IE had better dom support, altough since I started using javascript frameworks like extjs I care a bit less ;)

The difference is small because we willfully restrain ourselves from doing anything interesting/useful because we know it's useless to a large number of internet users (or will at least be too slow to use comfortably).

I would miss some addons in Firefox if I moved back to IE. Foxmarks (xmarks as its now called) is just too handy.

FoxieFoxie said,
Try opera for 7 days straight. I dare to say that you won't switch back.

ive done that..too many issues
no ad blocking
opera refuses to add right clicking to bookmark menus despite alot of requests..the UI is less space efficient
and to top it off..it STILL has issues with sites, had to have code added just for gmail, and right click doesnt work properly on sites that use right clicks
7 days of hell

Opera does have ad blocking. Right clicking in bookmarks - meh. (There's the sidebar if you need it.)

What gets me away from Opera on some occasions are its page freezing bugs and taking rather long to load HTTPS pages.

Neoauld said,
right click doesnt work properly on sites that use right clicks

Right clicks do work, you just have to enable them in Site Preferences -> Scripting. Bit of a pain yeah.

IE 8 is a great release from Microsoft, their best web browser release without a doubt, but yes, they face a very serious contender in Google Chrome when it comes down to raw web browsing without the extra bells & whistles (not that Chrome is feature-less with integrated dictionaries for forms, auto-populated "new tab" page even down to frequently used web search forms, and whatnot). What browser one prefer simply depends on one's usage patterns. To me, the core browser is too important for me to opt for IE 8 personally, and I use Chrome at work and Safari 4 for Mac at home. I might switch once Google releases their first official Google Chrome builds for Mac there as well.

But yes, IE 7 was just a momentarily "must have" for IE 6 users, now it's all about IE 8 to me. If the world of IE users ran IE 8, this would be such a very improved web.

Oh, and as for Firefox in all this, it's unfortunately feeling sluggish after having been used to Chrome, even their nightly TraceMonkey (3.5 beta 4 pre) builds. It also doesn't feature process separation and sandboxing like IE 8 and Chrome. It's great for niche uses due to their huge extension library, and I occasionally use it for that, but for now, Firefox has got a back seat in my browser selection. (both Chrome and IE 8 can have ad blocking, no problem there - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad_filtering)

im really happy with this release, i use firefox still because ive grown into it..and extensions like xmarks(formerly foxmarks) are just too invaluable to be
But when i need to view something in a separate browser IE's always my first choice now..and its faster than firefox from what i see

Who says if IE tried some of those experiments they couldn't do them too?

I'm sure the stuff in those experiments are not part of your daily javascript needs

burnblue said,
Who says if IE tried some of those experiments they couldn't do them too?

I'm sure the stuff in those experiments are not part of your daily javascript needs

If the browsers supported them they would be. I think people need to understand that developers are really holding themselves back. There's a lot more they could do if the browser support was there.

I like Internet Explorer because it displays ads perfectly - quite contrary to Firefox with Adblock enabled So for ad lovers it is a wonderful thing.

why pass? i actually use IE8 now along side firefox, i'm not sure i'll switch over but... if this is what new users can expect in Windows 7, they will have a good experience

[< snipped > - CalumJR] and coming to point of the article, IE 8 is somewhat finally trying to be equally good with competitors eventhough i'll pass this one too

wow - thanks for this article - I had a similar problem which was preventing IE8 from displaying my homepage. Once I disabled the "Java Plug-In's SSV Helper 2", IE8 is now functioning normally.

Does any one know what this Java Plug-In's SSV Helper 2 is supposed to do and why it causes problems?

I use http://www.freedownloadmanager.org/ as my download manager of choice. It even handles torrents and allows for easier organization of all the stuff I download.

Download managers aside, IE8 is now rocking on my system. I'm happy with it, as it feels quite snappy in loading pages. However, I do notice a 2 second delay in opening new tabs. That might be because of the two toolbars I have added: the Windows Live toolbar and Norton Internet Security 2009's toolbar. I read somewhere (probably here) that protected mode might have something to do with it too. It ain't that big a deal though, because IE8 has a bunch of advancements that override this minor thing.

There was an interesting editorial put out about a month ago elsewhere in which the author claimed that IE8 would be the last of the IE line--and that Microsoft would then switch to an open-source solution for web-rendering.

Nice editorial here though!

well you can change the engine under the hood while still keeping the same look on top. They don't have to end IE if they did change to a new web engine.

James7 said,
There was an interesting editorial put out about a month ago elsewhere in which the author claimed that IE8 would be the last of the IE line--and that Microsoft would then switch to an open-source solution for web-rendering.

Nice editorial here though! :)


Yes, I remember reading somewhere that they will have an IE9... I forget where though.

Smigit said,
well you can change the engine under the hood while still keeping the same look on top. They don't have to end IE if they did change to a new web engine.

Technically speaking, the rendering engine is IE.

iamwhoiam said,
Technically speaking, the rendering engine is IE.


no, the rendering engine is trident (mshtml.dll) always have been. And it will stay their rendering engine for the foreseeable future as confirmed by the IE team

Smigit said,
well you can change the engine under the hood while still keeping the same look on top. They don't have to end IE if they did change to a new web engine.


Recently at MIX09 they confirmed they are not ditching Trident for anything like Webkit, Gecko etc.

They would seriously be shooting themselves in the foot if they did do that. They need to support Enterprise, and I've found that quite a few non-IE browsers dont "play nice" in corporate environments.

Antaris said,
Recently at MIX09 they confirmed they are not ditching Trident for anything like Webkit, Gecko etc.

They would seriously be shooting themselves in the foot if they did do that. They need to support Enterprise, and I've found that quite a few non-IE browsers dont "play nice" in corporate environments.

I don't see how they'd be shooting themselves in the foot. I've used IE tab in FF before. If using a modern rendering engine, then loading a fallback rendering engine on demand can be done by plugin writers, I'm sure the task would be trivial for MS devs.

geoken said,


I don't see how they'd be shooting themselves in the foot. I've used IE tab in FF before. If using a modern rendering engine, then loading a fallback rendering engine on demand can be done by plugin writers, I'm sure the task would be trivial for MS devs.


they already do that with quirks mode and ie7 mode, what more do you want?

scoult01 ... I develop sites too and I haven't had any real problems with IE8 ... sure, it's not 100% standards compliant ...

What browser is?

I don't feel like there are any more issues here than any other browsers. Jeez, FF annoys me for some things as much as IE6 did to be honest! That said. ... I should point out, only in SOME cases. In general, IE6 is THE WORST BROWSER EVER CREATED!

Whew... sorry.

IE6 has caused more headaches for me than any other browser as well. The sooner we can get the entire world to dump IE6 the better!

Besides IE6, I've had as much trouble with Firefox as I have with IE7. Sure IE7 doesn't support everything that Firefox does - but I always just designed my sites with the lowest common denominator in mind. Even still, both IE7 and Firefox both had their own interpretations of the "standard."

I haven't had to touch anything for IE8 yet - everything tested out ok as it was...

From memory I think Safari is the closest so far (don't quote me on that). The issue lies with IE6 being ingrained into corporate environments (because it's built into the OS), and upgrading in corporate is a bloody pain in the ass. Therefore we're ultimately going to be stuck with any issues that IE8 may have for a long time to come, where as browsers like Firefox will continue to be updated to follow standards quite regularly.
At the moment IE6 is still around 50% of total IE users that head to the sites that I manage. Let's not forget that it was released roughly 8 years ago. That's a lot of my time that has been wasted due to poorly written software

it wasn't poorly written, things evolve, other browsers came... new so called 'standards' arrived, MS back then had no one to pit itself against

Spirit Dave said,
scoult01 ... I develop sites too and I haven't had any real problems with IE8 ... sure, it's not 100% standards compliant ...

What browser is?

I don't feel like there are any more issues here than any other browsers. Jeez, FF annoys me for some things as much as IE6 did to be honest! That said. ... I should point out, only in SOME cases. In general, IE6 is THE WORST BROWSER EVER CREATED!

Whew... sorry.


IE6 will eventually die: when corporations say goodbye to Xp.

Unfortunately this just becomes another browser that I have to support with issues that still exist with regards to standards. As a developer I find this incredibly frustrating.

We're already stuck with IE6 (despite it being super old) due to corporate environments who do not upgrade. We're now going to be burdened with the incompatibilities that exist with this release too for the foreseeable future.

While they've definitely stepped their game up, by not supporting standards completely like other browsers (or at least being pretty damn close), they're shafting developers yet again.

To what standards are you referring? They aimed for full CSS 2.1 compliance and did it last time I heard, except for the voice stuff that was created for accessibility purposes, but that's up to screen readers; even Firefox doesn't implement that out-of-the-box). HTML 4.01 is already there, and HTML5 seems to be implemented a little bit (the canvas API for example).

The only thing IE isn't doing is supporting XHTML. While I dislike this fact, I have no trouble sending HTML instead of XHTML for IE and other browsers that are incapable of understanding XHTML. Of course, I speak of XHTML as parsed by an XML processor. AFAIK, browsers usually interpret XHTML served as text/html as broken HTML.

Honestly, I see nothing wrong with IE 8 on the standards side. I'm sure the developers worked really hard to get IE to be as standards-compliant as it is today. By the way, if you haven't heard about it, there is no such thing as Web standards in the sense that you're using the word. There are recommendations and drafts but not standards. HTML 4.01 and older, XHTML 1.0 and newer, CSS, XML -- they're all recommendations (and in some cases they're drafts).

i had a delay on vista when opening the browser about 2 seconds, same with tabs... turns out it was, in my case previously applied spybot search & destroy settings that was the cause, see this thread

now, zero delay... and a very speedy browser from MS, believe it

I've narrowed down the Tab delay to 3rd party add-ons
java being the biggest culprit, i could see half a dozen java plug-ins for every single version of java, i just disabled all except the latest version.

disable the "research", windows live sign-in helper (i don't need their help!), adobe reader link helper (i've no idea what it does) and whatever you don't need.

but remember to re-enable those add-ons before you uninstall any of them, or they'll get stuck with IE forever (or until you mess with the registry)

the tabs now open almost instantly for me.


in vista, i'm suspecting the delays were caused by the add-ons trying to assume administrative control over something. because if you switch protected mode off, the tabs open rather quickly.

Ooh, look at that. I turned off the Java addins (only had the two entries for the current version), and now it's every bit as instant as Firefox when spawning tabs. There's still a quarter-second delay if I set it to the "new tab page" instead of about:blank, but I don't think I'll find much sympathy for that quarter second.

Adobe Reader 9.1, Silverlight 2, and Flash 10 addins don't seem to cause any delay. This is on a Server 2003 x64 machine in a limited account, for what it's worth.

i don't really like the "new tab page", it know what's in your clipboard!

i don't want to accidentally blog about some.... stuff..... that i happen to copy from somewhere....

There's a crazy bug on the forums that, if you click on the post field and hit Enter to insert a new line, it hits the "Add Reply" button instead and you get a blank post, or a post with just quotes.

IE 8 is integrated with Windows 7. IE 7 is the browser originally integrated on Windows Vista, which might explain any delay experienced. As for Windows XP, there's IE 6..then IE 7..then IE 8... The initial loading of IE 8 is painfully slow on my Windows XP machine ("slow" as defined by a computer user that expects things to be snappy like everything else is). New tabs open a bit faster than that, but there is still a delay as others have experienced.

Simply put, due to the design of Windows (or perhaps the NT kernel or something), certain core files that IE 8 uses can't be replaced because they're in use by Windows. As a result, the more IE versions that get added on, the slower things will probably get.

Then again, IE 8 is a step forward. Perhaps it is just badly designed right now, and IE 9 will be faster. *crosses fingers*

IE8 is tons better than previous IE releases out there and I can't wait for MS to push it out, the more people that use in the place of IE7 and IE6 *shudder* the better. I totally agree with you that it's a massive improvement.

From a developer's perspective, despite the very good impressions of it comparing it to other IE incarnations I still think it is lagging way behind in rendering speed and general usage speed when comparing it to other popular browsers. Also I found with the RC that it slowed down over time, I hope this is not the case with the final.

Also, on my 32-Bit Windows XP Professional system here at work I also don't get an instant response when opening a new tab.

The other thing that annoys me is that by using the Default "express" settings it seems to make itself your default browser, which is typical MS "win by stupidity" tactics. This will be especially nasty when they do eventually push it out to people as a Windows Update and they find their default browser changed without a simple way of changing it back again (simple for every day users, not somewhat literate users).

Overall, it's a welcome overhaul to the aging IE engine but I hope that this is the last incarnation of the IE engine and that they release a totally new and fast browser in the future.

Just my 2c

Not a simple way to change back?
EVERY browser I have ever used asked if you wanted it to be a default, when it noticed it is not.

Not a simple way to change back?
EVERY browser I have ever used asked if you wanted it to be a default, when it noticed it is not.

I get the Tab delay on my Windows 7 laptop with 2 GB of RAM and integrated graphics card.

It's probably due to the speed and power of your own PC.

I think it's probably related to an add-on or anti-spyware maybe? I don't know for sure so this is just more of a guess.

IE8 still has that option to start with everything off right? No add-ons or activeX etc. Would be interesting to see if you notice a difference with that mode as far as tab performance goes.

On Windows 7 I have a huge tab delay in Beta 2, On the same machine in Vista (RTM version) I get no lag at all. However on my laptop on vista I still get a huge tab delay. Hoperfully we'll receive some sort of update.

I love IE8 and don't experience any of the problems you've encountered speed wise. No delays etc. I run Windows 7 Build 7057 and 64 bit :)

It's rockin' and I HATED IE before this. FF and Chrome were my choices. Now I have neither of those installed

I've used FF in build 7000 but am now using IE8 in build 7068 32 bit. The tab previews are the clincher. I don't experience any tab delays and IE8's slower javascript does not seem to have any real-world effect.

I just wish that IE8 has an adblocker. I've tried using Inprivate browsing with filtering using the addresses from Adblock plus and it was blazing fast. If only they had this feature for normal mode. I would say that IE8 is as fast as FF with adblock but faster than FF with inprivate filtering.

Spirit Dave said,
I love IE8 and don't experience any of the problems you've encountered speed wise. No delays etc. I run Windows 7 Build 7057 and 64 bit :)

It's rockin' and I HATED IE before this. FF and Chrome were my choices. Now I have neither of those installed :)


same for me :-)

kheldorin said,
I've used FF in build 7000 but am now using IE8 in build 7068 32 bit. The tab previews are the clincher. I don't experience any tab delays and IE8's slower javascript does not seem to have any real-world effect.

I just wish that IE8 has an adblocker. I've tried using Inprivate browsing with filtering using the addresses from Adblock plus and it was blazing fast. If only they had this feature for normal mode. I would say that IE8 is as fast as FF with adblock but faster than FF with inprivate filtering.


You can use http://www.ie7pro.com/ for IE adblocking.

I experienced the tab delay, too. That and Javascript are undoubtedly the biggest reasons to not use it at this point, although I'd like to see the web standards a little bit better.

Regardless, kudos to Microsoft on a stellar improvement. Hopefully it catches on and I can ditch supporting IE7 in my CSS.

Mr. Andrews said,
I experienced the tab delay, too. That and Javascript are undoubtedly the biggest reasons to not use it at this point, although I'd like to see the web standards a little bit better.

Regardless, kudos to Microsoft on a stellar improvement. Hopefully it catches on and I can ditch supporting IE7 in my CSS.

tab delay can be due to antispyware programs
i had bad IE8 lag and then i removed spybots immunization..bang instant everythin

Mr. Andrews said,
I experienced the tab delay, too. That and Javascript are undoubtedly the biggest reasons to not use it at this point, although I'd like to see the web standards a little bit better.

Regardless, kudos to Microsoft on a stellar improvement. Hopefully it catches on and I can ditch supporting IE7 in my CSS.


There is a tab delay but it is 1) twice as fast as it was in IE7 2) if it is 3 seconds on your computer, you have a slow computer. It is about a second at most for me. This is not to say that this is ok. In every other browser I have used (Firefox, Opera and Chrome), the delay is about zero.

i recently switched from firefox 3.0 to ie8,
and i was really surprised to see how well(better) it performed.
esp. the tabs feature.

it also used a lot less resources .
even after leaving it on for a few days it was consuming less than 80 mb of ram.
whereas in the same scenario firefox 3 took up more than 200mb.

makes me wonder whether M$ has had a change of soul.
they've become a lot more responsive.

babyHacker said,

2) if it is 3 seconds on your computer, you have a slow computer. It is about a second at most for me. This is not to say that this is ok.

I'm seeing it too (about 3 seconds). I'm running Vista 32-bit on a Core 2 Duo.

Brandon Live said,
Have you checked the add-on manager? It can sometimes tell you which add-on is causing the delay in opening a new tab.


Never knew that column existed.

Anyways, both the PDF link helper and the Windows Live sign-in assistant report 0.00 second load times, but the time between clicking a new tab and having a page load (about:tabs or about:blank) is about half a second. Firefox and Chrome are slightly faster while Opera is almost instantaneous.

Mr. Andrews said,
I experienced the tab delay, too. That and Javascript are undoubtedly the biggest reasons to not use it at this point, although I'd like to see the web standards a little bit better.

Regardless, kudos to Microsoft on a stellar improvement. Hopefully it catches on and I can ditch supporting IE7 in my CSS.


While I was beta testing I found the reason for the delay. The issue is with the Java Add-on. You either need to disable it, or I think I just got an update that corrected that problem.