Google announces its own URL shortening service, goo.gl

Google is a company that seems to be getting itself into an increasing number of markets daily. The last couple of weeks have been especially busy, with many announcements made. Today, another was made, regarding its new & free URL shortening service, goo.gl, for use within its other products.

URL shorteners are great for services like Twitter, where characters are counted in posts, or for when a fully-sized link would look rather out of place. There are a very large number to choose from, but at the moment, there are only a few very popular ones (such as bit.ly). Google's new offering is only available through its own products, according to the blog post on the subject, but it comes with a few benefits, listed below.

  • Stability: Google's scalable, multi-datacenter infrastructure provides great uptime and a reliable service to our users.
  • Security: As we do with web search, shortened URLs are automatically checked to detect sites that may be malicious and warn users when the short URL resolves to such sites.
  • Speed: At Google we like fast products and we've worked hard to ensure this service is quick. We'll continue to iterate and improve the speed of Google Url Shortener.
It's arguable as to whether or not those points provide a big gain over other services, as the more popular ones tend to have those exact features anyway.

The proper link for the site, goo.gl, has nothing much to offer (as the service is limited to a couple products), but you can test out the Google URL Shortener (the official name) by using the Google Toolbar or FeedBurner.

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Yet another way that Google can get user behavioral data, which they can then turn around and sell for more profit.

Yey!

BigBoy said,
Yet another way that Google can get user behavioral data, which they can then turn around and sell for more profit.

Yey!


Pretty much, but I think the majority of the users out their either don't know or just don't care, probably a bit of both...

Now, before we take you to the domain you want, lets' modify the site to host a tiny little google ad along the top. WHat? We're shortening the domain for you, it's only right we make money off this!


...oh wait...we don't get pessimistic and see the obvious secondary motives. Maybe Google will start paying those who use their shorten to include an ad...which would be just as bad.

AgentGray said,
Now, before we take you to the domain you want, lets' modify the site to host a tiny little google ad along the top. WHat? We're shortening the domain for you, it's only right we make money off this!


...oh wait...we don't get pessimistic and see the obvious secondary motives. Maybe Google will start paying those who use their shorten to include an ad...which would be just as bad.

Yeah, because free services, competition, and choice are all BAD.

Google can go to hell. HOW DARE THEY give us free stuff!

AgentGray said,
Now, before we take you to the domain you want, lets' modify the site to host a tiny little google ad along the top. WHat? We're shortening the domain for you, it's only right we make money off this!


...oh wait...we don't get pessimistic and see the obvious secondary motives. Maybe Google will start paying those who use their shorten to include an ad...which would be just as bad.


No, actually I think the only reason Google would be offering this service is the same reason with their other services, to collect data, which is a different matter entirely.

Google is definitely insatiable, but one must recognize the quality of their products/services and their free nature. I mean, nothing stands the comparison for the most, and Google knows it, I've even been told that they are aware that ultimate quality is the only path to users' subscriptions: free is not enough should quality not follow, and quality here goes ahead even, it arrives before, it anticipates. I think Google, in terms of management, in terms of prospective, in terms of a company's culture, has at least ten years of advance.

Well, you almost got it. One definitely has to recognize their "free" nature because nothing is really "free". Google continues to spit in the face of privacy and walk around like they are God's gift to the Internet, all in the name of selling advertising to, as they put it, "enhance" your Internet "experience". When was the last time you felt "enhanced" by the commercials you see on TV?

With solid competition from Bing and others and organizations like Mozilla finally seeing the light, Google's time will be limited if they don't grow up and get their act together. Spitting out useless services like a URL shortening "service" is just another Google waste of time and resources.

Good ol' Google. They seem to do anything and everything these days that will get them your information or make you brand them or become even more dependent on them. Not a bad business move I guess, but how thin can they stretch their brand is what time will tell.

Can someone explain to me the benifits of using a url-shorter? I hate them. They hide the url, they mess with the pagerank and what will happen when they go out of buisiness? Even a small downtime on the shortener will ruin many of the posts on twitter atm.
Being able to posts links on a blogengine with some stupid restrictions is not a valid reason. The worst thing is when people use them on normal forums and chatmessages.

I think they "look" better on forums where you don't have any bbcode to hide a long url or it may even cause page deforming if too long...but to be honest I agree it's kind of useless.

I guess it may be of use if you want to hide the original url such as linking to an image on a site with innapropriate material. That said, I've seen printed magazines use the url which to me is insane as any day they could close down and the links now useless.

I agree with you blehbleh. The cons of not being able to see where you are navigating to, "placing all your eggs in one basket", and messing with the Page Rank systems that search engines use seem to out weigh the pros of having a small URL. At the same time, what else are you suppose to do when a URL for a news article is:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091214/ap_on_...29nbGV0ZXN0c24-

IMO, Yahoo doesn't deserve the page rank points for that nasty looking thing. (was linked to me earlier in an email).

If more websites used descriptive and orderly URLs, they would not need to exist apart from twitter users.

Sometimes URLs are about as long as a paragraph with some seemingly random alphanumeric appendage.

It's arguable as to whether or not those points provide a big gain over other services, as the more popular ones tend to have those exact features anyway.

Malware checks, really?

Not yet. Seems google only allow you to make use of it from their "toolbar" addon. Seems very "ungoogle" and against their open policy!

dvb2000 said,
Not yet. Seems google only allow you to make use of it from their "toolbar" addon. Seems very "ungoogle" and against their open policy!

don expect this to last .. sooner or later it will be open as it should