Mandriva Puts Linux on USB

Linux distributor Mandriva's Flash 4GB provides Mandriva Linux 2007 KDE 32-bit, which is bootable off the USB 2.0 stick sans installation. It includes drivers for common PC video cards, wireless adapters and modems – as well as the required firmware. It also offers some open source desktop environments, applications and plugins: KDE 3.5.4, Mozilla Firefox 1.5.0.10, OpenOffice.org 2.0.4, The Gimp 2.3.10, Real Player 10.0.8.805 and Flash Player 9.0.31.0. System configuration, preferences and data are all saved to the key for use in a subsequent session. Its GUI includes a rotating 3D cube effect when workspaces are changed.

The user gets to decide how to split up the 4GB flash drive into partitions. When the stick is first started up, the user is asked to allocate space for their system. Other than the promotion of Mandriva, and Linux in general, this has very interesting benefits for the average traveler in need of a computer. Essentially, you can take all your files and custom settings with you and use it on a public computer. No files need to be copied to the host's hard drive and no traces of your session are left on the host PC. The key software can be upgraded to Mandriva Linux 2007 Spring, the upcoming new version of the OS. Flash 4G costs €89 (US$175) and can be ordered online.

Link: More Information
News source: PC World

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9 Comments

I can see these coming in more useful when your Windows goes tits up, Live CD's are a bit slow at the best of times and Pen Drives should be better providing you have 2.0 to recover your data.

So they load "free" software onto a $40 flash drive and sell it for $175 each?

How can I get involved with this business?

raskren said,
So they load "free" software onto a $40 flash drive and sell it for $175 each?
How can I get involved with this business?

your more then welcome to do it yourself

Remember that somebody have to take the time to put it on the flash drive in the first place.

TurboTuna said,
your more then welcome to do it yourself

Remember that somebody have to take the time to put it on the flash drive in the first place.

xcopy /s c:\Linux E:

It takes about 10 seconds to craft that command and it would take a few minutes to actually copy the data.

P.S. the system is removing my backslashes.

raskren said,
[

xcopy /s c:Linux E:

It takes about 10 seconds to craft that command and it would take a few minutes to actually copy the data.

P.S. the system is removing my backslashes.

Not really, since it is done in ext3 and not ntfs/fat. You also have to make a partition with a linux-swap filesystem, and set things ok so the system can boot from the usb drive and detect and be able to boot various different machines. Here is where the trouble comes: compiling the kernel with the correct dependencies so it can be used for instance into a smp and a not-smp system as well.

More than that, linux is not free for all, it can be distributed freelly but people are not forbidden to make money uppon it. They sell the "box" of the system cause it includes burned dvds, cute disks, and all that stuff that more technic people doesnt need. Indeed, they are selling 1 year of support for the product.

I dont think its soooo expensive.

PS: you can buy a paid compilation of linux and install it in as many machines as you want and still be in law. (depending if there are no single-copy programs on the bundle, like corel and etc)

Anyone have any idea on how to make a windows bood on a USB? i am talking about moving the contents of the windows Installation files from a CD/DVD and place them on a USB flash drive, and boot off of it just like i would boot off of any windows CD/DVD

i tried google-ing this and haven;t found anything related, only on how to make a BartPE windows on a flash drive. but that's not what i was looking for.

another article was on how to do it with vista.... but since vista is not my favorite OS yet. i still need XP.

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