Market Solutions to the IP Address Squeeze

Perhaps too late, it's widely recognized now that the IPv4 address pool will run out in the next few years. The current prediction, based on current data, is for the IANA to exhaust its pool on Jan. 25, 2011, and for the last block from the last RIR (Regional Internet Registry) to go on Dec. 26, 2011. Perhaps someone will buy it in a Boxing Day sale.

The answer to the problem has been around for ages: IPv6. It's supported by all major operating systems and network hardware vendors (at least for enterprise equipment), and many tests have shown it to be practical. Problem is, it's incompatible with IPv4, so all networking software needs to be updated to support it.

A number of proposals have been made for a transitional software setup to help people move from IPv4 to IPv6 (Comcast made one just the other day), but it's clear that these are moving users too slowly, if at all. We'll run out before a lot of people have moved to IPv6.

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Easy: Just do like TV and force conversion (moving to digital) or Y2K. Its another reason for us to go spend out money. Better yet, come up with an 'upgrade' company/solution!

(midosm.com said @ #3)
Easy: Just do like TV and force conversion (moving to digital) or Y2K. Its another reason for us to go spend out money. Better yet, come up with an 'upgrade' company/solution!


It's far more than just a company solution. Nothing to to with that necessarily. Flipping a switch is just the final thing and is easy words falling out of the mouth. What you're saying is a company solution is like saying George W. Bush is the cause for the economy declining...when in fact its how our monetary system works and credit cards to help spoil it all. It took time for this to happen. Everyone saw it coming and the problem needs a patsy.

The article treats the lack IPv6 adoption as a 'people' problem, and not as the business decision problem that it really is. For the end user, IPv6 simply requires the flip of a switch as today's OS supports it. What is needed is for ISPs to provide IPv6 connectivity, in particular backhaul providers.

Allowing the sale of IP addresses is nothing but a temporary solution to a problem that should've never happened in the first place. The article mentions how the cost would be an incentive to move to IPv6, but how exactly does that work with your residential ISP? They can't tell their user "Well we've run out of IPs, so you're getting a v6 one. Have fun accessing the 6bone, too bad you can't access the rest of the Internet."

(dandin1 said @ #2)
The article treats the lack IPv6 adoption as a 'people' problem, and not as the business decision problem that it really is. For the end user, IPv6 simply requires the flip of a switch as today's OS supports it. What is needed is for ISPs to provide IPv6 connectivity, in particular backhaul providers.

Allowing the sale of IP addresses is nothing but a temporary solution to a problem that should've never happened in the first place. The article mentions how the cost would be an incentive to move to IPv6, but how exactly does that work with your residential ISP? They can't tell their user "Well we've run out of IPs, so you're getting a v6 one. Have fun accessing the 6bone, too bad you can't access the rest of the Internet."


Good eye, dandin. The adoption is not the peoples' problem. If anything, they should direct this at MSO's/ISP's - of which I will play devil's advocate... My company has requested a block back in January and to this day we still await that block to be given to us. We're recycling IP's to customer's that aren't being considerate. Especially those who soil them on a blacklist. The equipment is being put in...at the cost of its customers obviously. But with the economy slowing down production and projects are also doing the same. It's certainly not slowing the growth of more computers getting online. You can forget what residential customers think until it affects drones of them. We are aware. Believe it. It's just a matter of time.

And people keeps blaming why some companies (Microsoft included) stay with some old technologies to maintain compatibility (and some bugs and insecure code) instead of switching to more secure new methods and break compatibility !!!

x64 bit computing is out since WinXP x64 edition, and now vista, and is not yet gaining popularity due to the reduces set of available software and drivers that really support x64.

technology is a difficult market with challenging choices...

Actually 64bit computing has been out far longer, only recently has it made it's way to the desktop market.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/64-bit

64-bit CPUs have existed in supercomputers since the 1960s and in RISC-based workstations and servers since the early 1990s. In 2003 they were introduced to the (previously 32-bit) mainstream personal computer arena, in the form of the x86-64 and 64-bit PowerPC processor architectures.

(ramik said @ #1)
And people keeps blaming why some companies (Microsoft included) stay with some old technologies to maintain compatibility (and some bugs and insecure code) instead of switching to more secure new methods and break compatibility !!!

x64 bit computing is out since WinXP x64 edition, and now vista, and is not yet gaining popularity due to the reduces set of available software and drivers that really support x64.

technology is a difficult market with challenging choices...


Your knowledge about this topic seems little. Your answer has little to do with the topic discussed. We can talk about compatibility 'til the cows come home. Drivers? We're talking about a protocol here, not hardware. It sounds like you're upset with a hardware/software issue and need to stick to a mac.