MegaUpload founder's asset ruled "null and void" by NZ judge

In a new development in the case against MegaUpload founder Kim Dotcom, a judge in New Zealand has ruled that the raid on Dotcom's assets in January was not conducted properly and has declared the raid's restraining order "null and void."

The raid on Dotcom's property was first conducted in January when US and New Zealand law enforcement officials shut down MegaUpload, claiming that the site was being used for online piracy. Dotcom and several other MegaUpload team members were arrested and $200 million in assets were seized, including freezing bank accounts and taking away a number of Dotcom's luxury sports cars.

However, The New Zealand Herald reports that on Friday law enforcement officials admitted they had made a "procedural error" in regards to ordering the original raid on MegaUpload and Dotcom's assets. The paperwork was applied to an order that did not allow Dotcom to launch his own defense.

After the raid, the mistake later corrected with law enforcement officials submitting the proper paperwork and retroactively listing all of MegaUpload's assets as being seized. However, this is just a temporary measure until the judge in the case, Justice Judith Potter, rules on whether or not Dotcom can get his assets back due to the original mistake.

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22 Comments

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Give the dude he's stuff. At least he did not rob banks or kill innocent people, leave the man alone. He made money by being smart, go and chase real criminals for crying out loud. Stop this rubbish now.

They made a mistake so he should get his property back. It seems unfair to me that they tried to "fix" it by listing what they seized after they seized it. And it's unfair to that they seized everything he had, leaving him with no money to defend himself. Of course, he got around that somehow (friends, perhaps) but the fact remains that the law enforcement officials made a mistake.

Can any of these agencies do anything right? These guys make a procedural error in a raid. We never found all those WMD's in Iraq. Took 10+ years to track down Bin Laden. Don't have a clue what Iran or North Korea are doing although you hear reports of all kinds.

Are there really that many dipsticks in places of real importance?

cork1958 said,
Can any of these agencies do anything right? These guys make a procedural error in a raid. We never found all those WMD's in Iraq. Took 10+ years to track down Bin Laden. Don't have a clue what Iran or North Korea are doing although you hear reports of all kinds.

Are there really that many dipsticks in places of real importance?

Procedural error is another term for "we tried to do things outside of the rules and got burned for it"

3dfxman said,
So does this mean the site will come back? lol

Not for general Public use

it's been ruled that his assets were Illegally seized but the FBI has not yet decided whether or not to allow users of megaupload access to their files the site however will most likely not be returning what you'll get is an email from the FBI with a link to your stuff but only if it's legal content not pirated movies mp3's or programs

and the point is if this was your only form of backup then shame on you

Athlonite said,

Not for general Public use

it's been ruled that his assets were Illegally seized but the FBI has not yet decided whether or not to allow users of megaupload access to their files the site however will most likely not be returning what you'll get is an email from the FBI with a link to your stuff but only if it's legal content not pirated movies mp3's or programs

and the point is if this was your only form of backup then shame on you

Don't be silly i have my own offsite backup

What does this mean "After the raid, the mistake later corrected with law enforcement officials submitting the proper paperwork and retroactively listing all of MegaUpload's assets as being seized" its missing a was or something... I'm on a phone and dont see a report button though.

x-byte said,
Didn't FBI delete the content of Megaupload as well?

Nope, they didnt delete any of the content uploaded in Megaupload - They're actually currently thinking of giving people access to thier original files.

So... er... now the guys will have all their monies to hire the best lawasses and drag this case on and on for ages while keeping up luxury lifestyle?
Yeah! That's what I'm talking about... hopefully.

scratch42069 said,
Of course they jumped the gun. They had to time it with the SOPA thing.

duh. they assumed SOPA would be passed by then. oops. case is just going to fall apart faster than Rapidshares did.