Mercedes-Benz cars to feature Google's "Projected Mode," leak suggests

Google is said to be working on "Projected Mode," an in-car system for better Android integration, and a leaked job posting from Daimler suggests that the technology might be close to being implemented in its upcoming cars.

The job posting on Daimler's website, which has been altered after the leak, mentioned the requirement of a software engineer to implement "Google Projected Mode" in the German manufacturer's cars. Projected Mode is believed to be a system to integrate Android smartphones in the car's dashboard for better communication, entertainment and navigation purposes. 

The translated version of Daimler's description of the system is: 

Smartphone functions such as play, for example, media content, send messages / receive phone calls, navigation, etc., can be controlled and displayed on a safe for the driver way through the vehicle's controls.

Daimler will be bringing Google's in-car system to all Mercedes-Benz cars sold in all markets worldwide. Google already has formed the Open Automotive Alliance with Audi, GM, Honda and Hyundai to develop standards for connected cars and the latest revelation from Daimler could mean that the company will be the latest to join the Alliance.

Apple recently announced CarPlay system for iPhone users which includes support for Mercedes-Benz cars as well. Google has yet to announce a finished product for its partners in the OAA.

Source: Engadget | Image via Auto Evolution

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13 Comments

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Looking forward to seeing what Google comes up with. Compatibility with my Android devices would give any auto maker a definite advantage selling to me.

simplezz said,
Looking forward to seeing what Google comes up with. Compatibility with my Android devices would give any auto maker a definite advantage selling to me.

herein lies a problem for me. Some tools should be purchased or used specifically for how well it performs for the task it was built for. Cars are vehicles primarily, and navigation is an extra. People should be buying cars based on its safety standards, its performance and its gas consumption.

by adding these fancy android crap in it, I worry that the general public will put a greater emphasis on the tech dashboard of a car than other aspects that are much more important.

agrees. the cars nowdays go into a direction where way too much stuff is distracting. they need to tone down everything. way too many buttons, too many icons, displays, etc. its not that it is very complicated, it is mostly not, but it is way too distracting.
someone has to come up with a striking idea how to combine all these functions into a few simple commands.

*rollseyes* I wish phone/tablet interfaces for cars was a fully standardized thing and not tied to a specific device type for extra functionality.

I hope so, but the article mentions that Android will have better integration. I read that as superior and not just "up to par", hopefully you're right though and all devices are equally well supported across all cars. Part of that is up to the device manufacturers though, some are always trying to push a unique new method that breaks everything.

Exactly. I carry Android gear and like it, but half way into a car what if I switch to another platform?

Or another driver uses another platform?

An agnostic mirroring platform is the best way to handle things.

I'm all for innovation, but I think fancy screens in cars means more distractions for the driver. I guess I'm old fashioned when I say I like my cars plain and dumb, just like my TVs (no "smart" crap).

kidjenius said,
I'm all for innovation, but I think fancy screens in cars means more distractions for the driver. I guess I'm old fashioned when I say I like my cars plain and dumb, just like my TVs (no "smart" crap).

I'm mostly with you, with a couple of notable exceptions -- I love GPS when I'm going somewhere I'm familiar with, parking cameras (especially simulated "overhead" a la Infiniti) is great, and having a real tire pressure monitor (where you can see the actual pressure in each tire) is extremely handy.

Phone integration I don't really care for, though handsfree is handy if my headset's battery is dead!

kidjenius said,
I'm all for innovation, but I think fancy screens in cars means more distractions for the driver. I guess I'm old fashioned when I say I like my cars plain and dumb, just like my TVs (no "smart" crap).

It really depends on the design, layout, and relevance. GM has some rather flashy dashes in the 1980s and they were found not to be a distraction to drivers, although they didn't fit the 'taste' of older car buyers.

The Corvette is a good example, as the Dash was toned down and even the Bose sound had the lower end base reduced to accommodate the +45 buyers.

As long as the system works reliably, it really doesn't matter if the visual is analog or digitally created. The biggest problem GM had was in the 1984 Buick Rivera with one of the first touch screen full dash controls, as the computing power and reliability were not ready for a production vehicle.

(Look up the 2014 Corvette Dash and array of LCD panels. They can be flashy or as plain as a more conservative classic sports car.)

kidjenius said,
I'm all for innovation, but I think fancy screens in cars means more distractions for the driver. I guess I'm old fashioned when I say I like my cars plain and dumb, just like my TVs (no "smart" crap).

You would think it would lead to more distractions but really, every driver has a phone already. If they can't integrate it with their car they are more likely to do stupid things like try to operate their phone while driving. I would much prefer that they were operating an in car system designed with safety in mind than attempting to type out a message on a little phone screen as many people do right now.