Metro version of Microsoft Office in development

Among the many revelations about Windows 8 at BUILD this week came further confirmation from Microsoft that x86 applications won’t run on hardware powered by ARM processors.

In a Q&A session with financial analysts on Wednesday, Windows president Steven Sinofsky highlighted the fact that Metro style applications can be easily reworked to support ARM or x86, but avoided discussion of how existing x86 applications might be ported to ARM through emulation or virtualisation methods.

Thisismynext.com believes that Microsoft hasn’t yet told the whole story about its plans on that front, pointing to comments made to them by Mike Angiulo, vice-president for Windows Planning, who said that “porting things and whether we open native desktop development are decisions that are either not made or not announced yet”.

One major product that will need to be ported to ARM is, of course, Microsoft Office. Microsoft showed a version of Office running on ARM hardware (apparently identical to the x86 version) at CES. On that subject, Angiulo said that Microsoft “didn’t make the promise of shipping it or announce a SKU, but I showed it running, so you do the math”. He then added: “You have potentially an Office solution that’s ‘real Office’, and you have all these Metro style apps; you almost start thinking, at what point is it not confusing anymore?”

Microsoft Office running on ARM development hardware at CES 2011.  Image source: Engadget

Angiulo’s implication would appear to be that Microsoft still plans to bring a full version of Office to ARM, and that a Metro implementation is also on the cards – and that assertion is supported by comments made by none other than Microsoft’s CEO, Steve Ballmer, in Wednesday’s Q&A: “The brilliance of the Windows 8 strategy is we get all of the applications that come from Windows on x86, as well as applications that have gone through the process of rethinking how they might work in a Windows 8 world… We are rethinking and working hard on what it would mean to do Office Metro style.”

It’s no surprise that Office will be coming to ARM, given the importance of the Office suite in Microsoft’s product portfolio (and knowing the vast revenues that sales of Office bring in for the company), but it’s certainly good to know that a Metro version will be on the way. This is a far cry from Microsoft’s Tablet PC push a decade ago, when the Office division famously refused to develop versions of its programs optimised for tablet usage.

Thankfully, Microsoft’s numerous internal divisions tend to play more nicely these days, and the better integration and exposure of the company’s various products – first with Windows Phone, and soon with Windows 8 – will surely strengthen its efforts.

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jasonon said,
will the metro office be majorly "dumbed" down like the app on wp7?

Probably simplified a lot. You'd end up with Word being slightly better than Wordpad I'd guess, but unless you're just jotting down random thoughts, most of us will stick to the desktop version.

jasonon said,
will the metro office be majorly "dumbed" down like the app on wp7?

I doubt it, limiting it on the phone makes sense, there's lots of stuff you just can't do on a phone when it comes to office apps. But there's no reason why the metro desktop version would be the same.

jasonon said,
will the metro office be majorly "dumbed" down like the app on wp7?

Just look at the online Office apps for an idea of how Metro Office will be. If anything, Metro Office will be slightly more powerful than these online versions of Office.

Metro means business will not upgrade if it can't be disabled. Thankfully Microsoft is not that stupid. Thank God for the registry hack on Windows 8 Developer Preview. Can't deal with those unsightly tiles.

UndergroundWire said,
Metro means business will not upgrade if it can't be disabled. Thankfully Microsoft is not that stupid. Thank God for the registry hack on Windows 8 Developer Preview. Can't deal with those unsightly tiles.

Nonsense. I work in a large multinational, and management have expressed significant interest. Metro is suited for many types of employee, especially those who just use the web, email and do a bit of document / spreadsheet editing.

Sure there are several types of business user where Metro is not suited, but thats why the desktop is still there. It hasn't gone anywhere. It just means that when a user logs on, they get lots of information at a glance, then with one click they glide over to the classic desktop and do their work in visual studio, photoshop, etc.

There are also other types of user where Metro would be perfectly suited in business... for example, touch screen terminals on the shop floor for pulling up production line stats, announcements, also for use in warehouses at stock picking stations. Orders come in, the employee picks the items and keys in some data on the touch screen.

You just need a little vision my friend.... tarring all business with your lack of imagination isn't the answer.

TCLN Ryster said,

You just need a little vision my friend.... tarring all business with your lack of imagination isn't the answer.

Actually it is you that needs vision. I guarantee you that Metro will be disabled on Enterprise versions. Business do not some kiddie looking user interface.

UndergroundWire said,
I guarantee you that Metro will be disabled on Enterprise versions.

I personally believe that the enterprise stands to benefit the most from Metro, and the underlying Windows Runtime.

Once you understand how the Metro Start screen works with the charms and the like, you will see there are many ways for enterprise to benefit from connected apps over the classic desktop model of siloed applications.

There are components built into the Windows Runtime specifically targeting enterprise features like SmartCard authentication, etc. Metro IS the UI for building on the Windows Runtime.

With that said, I guarantee YOU are mistaken.

dotf said,

I personally believe that the enterprise stands to benefit the most from Metro, and the underlying Windows Runtime.

Once you understand how the Metro Start screen works with the charms and the like, you will see there are many ways for enterprise to benefit from connected apps over the classic desktop model of siloed applications.

There are components built into the Windows Runtime specifically targeting enterprise features like SmartCard authentication, etc. Metro IS the UI for building on the Windows Runtime.

With that said, I guarantee YOU are mistaken.

Time will tell my friend. I understand already that I don't like Metro. I also understand that in the end when this is released and reports are published, one of us will be laughing best.

Metro works best for hotel lobby's and other check-in type public computer terminals. It will not work for offices that deal with normal business day-to-day functions. I see people adopting Windows 7 now that haven't yet and will not go beyond that if Metro is not disabled in the enterprise version. It's just nonsense. So for now you can laugh and have other people agree with you, but I will have the last laugh. Of this I am confident.

this whole metro crap is BS. I guess I am going to stick with win 7 for a long time. Probably they should have released two version of win 8, one for tablet and other for desktop. Not all the desktops are going to have touch screen and even touch screen for regular use is simply retarted. Metro UI is one of the ugliest interface MS has put through.

Auditor said,
.....

Now that I have the thumbs keyboard layout on my touchsmart tm2 convertible laptop, I don't use the physical keyboard anymore.

Metro enables unique application experiences not possible in the classic win32 desktop model.
It's a shame you are so willing to discard an idea, without experiencing it.

I'm also using Win8 dev preview on hardware that isn't touch enabled, and i have to say, even with keybard/mouse it's a nice paradigm.

Learning what is running under the metro UI also helps me appreciate the overal design even more.

Auditor said,
this whole metro crap is BS. I guess I am going to stick with win 7 for a long time. Probably they should have released two version of win 8, one for tablet and other for desktop. Not all the desktops are going to have touch screen and even touch screen for regular use is simply retarted. Metro UI is one of the ugliest interface MS has put through.

OMG, the ignorance again astounds me. Don't want Metro? Then don't use it. Nobody is forcing it upon you. One click or one keystroke and you at the desktop and can stay there forever (well until you log off/reboot). Learn to read and comprehend mate.

If that one click is too much trouble for you, then stick on Windows 7 for the next 7-8 years. Better yet, move to Apple. With ignorance like this, you'd fit right in.

I can just see this now, using one's two middle fingers to create or edit a Word document, much less entering figures into Excel cells. Microsoft seems to be ignoring the millions of user who have productive work to do using mouse/keyboard. Using the crude keyboard layout on a tablet by a touch-typist--not going to work. Maybe hunt-and-peckers can use it. So now, table buyers will have to buy an external keyboard for the data entry--why not just buy a regular laptop or desktop computer?

TsarNikky said,
I can just see this now, using one's two middle fingers to create or edit a Word document, much less entering figures into Excel cells. Microsoft seems to be ignoring the millions of user who have productive work to do using mouse/keyboard. Using the crude keyboard layout on a tablet by a touch-typist--not going to work. Maybe hunt-and-peckers can use it. So now, table buyers will have to buy an external keyboard for the data entry--why not just buy a regular laptop or desktop computer?

How are they ignoring them? Can you people not read? They're still making traditional versions of Office as well... @_@

~Johnny said,

How are they ignoring them? Can you people not read? They're still making traditional versions of Office as well... @_@


+1 Johnny. The ignorance in this thread is astounding. People seem to think the classic desktop is just going away or something, or that every app ever invented needs to have a metro version.

In fact, there are many apps (photoshop, dreamweaver, etc) that are not and will never be suited to Metro. This is known and accepted by all involved.

For those companies that are still on Office 2007, they can wait until Office Metro comes out and skip Office 2010. For 2010 holders, they can wait until Office Metro 2014.

KingCrimson said,
For those companies that are still on Office 2007, they can wait until Office Metro comes out and skip Office 2010. For 2010 holders, they can wait until Office Metro 2014.

Honestly, Office Metro probably won't be aimed at companies at all, considering the loss of functions it would need to fit in the UI. It's most likely be aimed at home users and simpler tablet consumption, whilst the rest of us, and companies, will still get desktop Office to use.

I think it would be nice if they let people who primarily use the desktop 'tear off' Metro apps into desktop windows. Maybe even let the start screen just pull out from the bottom and only partially cover the screen or something. For people with 30" monitors @ 2560x1600 making anything but the most complicated of apps go fullscreen is just a waste of pixels...

JonathanMarston said,
I think it would be nice if they let people who primarily use the desktop 'tear off' Metro apps into desktop windows. Maybe even let the start screen just pull out from the bottom and only partially cover the screen or something. For people with 30" monitors @ 2560x1600 making anything but the most complicated of apps go fullscreen is just a waste of pixels...

We've seen so far that you can have two metro apps side by side, who's to say you can't have more when it's all said and done? I have mirc as a full screen app up all the time with other apps as windows that come up over it and then get minimized again. I do this because of the number of chat windows I have open so I need all the space. The point here is that it's not a complicated app by a long shot. I have a 24" monitor btw, and even with a 30" monitor i'd still do the same thing in the end.

JonathanMarston said,
I think it would be nice if they let people who primarily use the desktop 'tear off' Metro apps into desktop windows. Maybe even let the start screen just pull out from the bottom and only partially cover the screen or something. For people with 30" monitors @ 2560x1600 making anything but the most complicated of apps go fullscreen is just a waste of pixels...

It was demonstrated in the vid from June that you could snap metro apps next to the traditional desktop if that's what you meant.

Sadelwo said,

It was demonstrated in the vid from June that you could snap metro apps next to the traditional desktop if that's what you meant.

Aye, but the part you snap is only 320 or 480px wide (I forget which), and you can't change the size.

~Johnny said,

Aye, but the part you snap is only 320 or 480px wide (I forget which), and you can't change the size.

No, they showed it a few times, you can pick how big it is as you snap it, it can be 50/50 on screen if you want.

~Johnny said,

Aye, but the part you snap is only 320 or 480px wide (I forget which), and you can't change the size.

No, they showed it a few times, you can pick how big it is as you snap it, it can be 50/50 on screen if you want.

Midnight Mick said,
Metro is the "Janet & John" of operating systems UI's, appealing to the dumb.

Hardly. Unless of course you're calling me, and everyone else who likes it "dumb".

The difference between me and you I think is that I "get it". I can clearly imagine how all my favourite apps will fit into Metro. Those that don't will exist on the classic desktop, which I will be using also from time to time.

A simplified interface for the day to day usage of a computer, with all information at your fingertips (literally if you own a touch screen) on your home screen, with apps able to share information effortlessly between each other, utilising a unified search facility and looking vibrant and modern. Yeah, must be totally dumb to like the sound of that.

TCLN Ryster said,

Hardly. Unless of course you're calling me, and everyone else who likes it "dumb".

The difference between me and you I think is that I "get it". I can clearly imagine how all my favourite apps will fit into Metro. Those that don't will exist on the classic desktop, which I will be using also from time to time.

A simplified interface for the day to day usage of a computer, with all information at your fingertips (literally if you own a touch screen) on your home screen, with apps able to share information effortlessly between each other, utilising a unified search facility and looking vibrant and modern. Yeah, must be totally dumb to like the sound of that.

As a software developer, I don't see how the Metro UI helps me. I like the Windows 7 interface for managing Visual Studio, Explorer windows, Outlook and I don't want that to change. I guess I'd simply run in the classic Windows desktop mode.

KingCrimson said,

As a software developer, I don't see how the Metro UI helps me. I like the Windows 7 interface for managing Visual Studio, Explorer windows, Outlook and I don't want that to change. I guess I'd simply run in the classic Windows desktop mode.

There's no reason why something like Visual Studio can't run as a full screen app though. Most of the time everything you need is right in there and you're not jumping between windows often. Also explorer in metro works, just add tabs to it, that takes care of the multiple explorer window issue since the only reason people open more than one WE window is because it doesn't have tabs. Switching between VS and the new tabbed WE is as simple as alt+tab inside the start screen itself, this can all be done without going to the desktop at all if the apps are done the right way. And outlook, I mean how long do you actually stay in outlook? I use outlook 2007 for my email and 98% of the time it's minimized to the try so I don't even see it. Metro supports notifications, they pop up in the lower right just like they do on the desktop, thus until something new comes in you don't need to have it open as a window really.

KingCrimson said,
As a software developer, I don't see how the Metro UI helps me.

Then you're thinking about it backwards. Do not see yourself as the user, see how what you develop for Metro will help your users.

First off, Metro IS the UI paradigm for Windows Runtime (WinRT).
WinRT is the cleanest API microsoft have ever come up with for interacting with Windows.

Gone are the days of messy COM interop and P-Invoke in your managed language.
The Windows Runtime pulls all the power of windows into a nice clean abstraction that will allow you to build complex applications in a simple syntax.

If you truly believe your statement, head over to channel9 and watch "Lap around the Windows Runtime" session from BUILD.

If you can't figure out how metro will help you as a developer after watching that session, you may need to start developing for other platforms.

KingCrimson said,

As a software developer, I don't see how the Metro UI helps me. I like the Windows 7 interface for managing Visual Studio, Explorer windows, Outlook and I don't want that to change. I guess I'd simply run in the classic Windows desktop mode.


You just don't "get it" ... Metro isn't there to help you as a developer, it's there to help the average consumer. MS have made quite clear that apps like photoshop, web dev tools etc, should not be run in Metro but should be run on the desktop. Metro gives consumers a rich immersive experience, which IMO is a big improvement. It's in your interest as a developer to develop for Metro if you wan't to progress your sales.

Although for the record regarding Outlook, there is absolutely no reason whatsoever why there can't be a Metro version of that. Mail with folders, calendar, to do, etc can all work happily in Metro. In fact, I cant wait until theres a nice unified inbox email app for Metro with a unified calendar too, all tied into alarms with those nice little notification popups, etc.

Edited by Ryster, Sep 18 2011, 10:00am :

warwagon said,
When was the Windows 8 dev release compiled?

12th September at 17:33 according to the build string, however this is clearly not correct. That wouldn't give them enough time to release it on the night of the 13th.

Looking at the properties of a few exe's in the Windows System32 folder, looks like alot (if not all) of them were created on the 24th August.

TCLN Ryster said,

12th September at 17:33 according to the build string, however this is clearly not correct. That wouldn't give them enough time to release it on the night of the 13th.

Looking at the properties of a few exe's in the Windows System32 folder, looks like alot (if not all) of them were created on the 24th August.

Build string got updated in one of the updates on Windows Update - the original string was August 30.

daniel_rh said,
First I want to see how is going Metro to look on the final version of Windows 8

A sensible comment, how refreshing

TCLN Ryster said,

A sensible comment, how refreshing

It's not sensible, it's ignorant. Microsoft is confident that the Metro UI will have no big changes because otherwise they would not have told developers to start build apps for it.

sopharine said,

It's not sensible, it's ignorant. Microsoft is confident that the Metro UI will have no big changes because otherwise they would not have told developers to start build apps for it.

Who said anything about big changes? Now who's being ignorant? A framework doesn't have to be 100% finished to start building apps for it.

It's quite clear that the keyboard/mouse interraction isn't finished yet. Just a day or so ago they pushed a windows update to enable you to navigate your tiles with a keyboard. More of those will come in the coming days. This is just one example of why it's important for consumers not to form any judgements based purely on a sneak preview for developers only.

Maybe the Start menu isn't there because that's not the target for testing yet? (Also, consider that there's no touch support for it yet, as some folks may even prefer the Start menu, even on touch-supporting hardware.) It's still way too early, and, considering Microsoft has not said that the Start menu is going anywhere, there's no need to panic.

PGHammer said,
Maybe the Start menu isn't there because that's not the target for testing yet? (Also, consider that there's no touch support for it yet, as some folks may even prefer the Start menu, even on touch-supporting hardware.) It's still way too early, and, considering Microsoft has not said that the Start menu is going anywhere, there's no need to panic.

Metro Start IS the Start Menu, at least in the current build of Windows. Microsoft have demonstrated this clearly in all the keynotes and in-depth talks they've done at the build conference. Who know's how it will be when Windows 8 hits RTM though...

Personally, I'd like a classic start menu to be an option to turn on. If you're a graphic designer, or a web developer, or some other user who's app doesn't suit metro, then clearly metro isn't for you. You're going to be on the classic desktop more than you are the Metro UI, there's nothing wrong with that. However, it's jarring to have to pull open that full screen Metro start menu to get to things like control panel, your programs list, etc. They need a classic start menu for those people who will be in the classic desktop most of the time.

For me, once the apps I use are metro aware I'll be happy to stay in Metro and just drop to classic desktop every now and then.

I think people are thinking to narrow when they think of ARM - assuming that ARM will be forever a tablet CPU when in reality if you look at the huge amount of investment taking place by the big players I wouldn't be surprised if we see ARM desktops and laptops selling in the future based on the 64bit 'Project Denver' being developed jointly by ARM and nVidia.

Mr Nom Nom's said,
I think people are thinking to narrow when they think of ARM - assuming that ARM will be forever a tablet CPU when in reality if you look at the huge amount of investment taking place by the big players I wouldn't be surprised if we see ARM desktops and laptops selling in the future based on the 64bit 'Project Denver' being developed jointly by ARM and nVidia.

There's a lot of ARM netbooks flying around at the moment running Windows CE... but with all the effort Intel have been doing to reduce the power usage of their processors for laptops (now have processors that can run off small solar panels), there really won't seem to be much need to go for ARM anyway. Though until Intel gets those out, I suppose ARM shall have to be an interim - but it's days of laptops & desktops seem numbered.

Again, none.... well a lot of you do not understand what Metro UI is for... Reading the comments above this is clear. Metro UI is useful for Phone, Tablet, Slate, and any other type of touch interface, yes including 23 inch touchscreen LED/LCD's. This is not the only UI that will ship with Windows 8, please stop spreading FUD and acting like it is. The comments are getting stupid at this point.

xendrome said,
Again, none.... well a lot of you do not understand what Metro UI is for... Reading the comments above this is clear. Metro UI is useful for Phone, Tablet, Slate, and any other type of touch interface, yes including 23 inch touchscreen LED/LCD's. This is not the only UI that will ship with Windows 8, please stop spreading FUD and acting like it is. The comments are getting stupid at this point.

No one ever said it's the only UI...
However, no one who knows what he is talking about would say it's only for touch devices, even if you use mouse and keyboard the Metro UI and Metro apps will be there, there is no traditional start menu any more, it has been replaced by the Metro start screen.
If you are at the normal desktop and click the network icon by the clock to connect to a network or view the status of the current one a metro panel will slide in from the right.

Metro is going to be a big part of Windowns 8 no matter the device you use it on.

It's also useful for the Desktop computers, though for serious productivity the traditional desktop is going to reign over it - and that's why it's there.

There's a reason Ballmer calls this "their riskiest release ever". We're all going to see the Immersive UI front and centre next to our desktops, regardless of platform (:

xendrome said,
Again, none.... well a lot of you do not understand what Metro UI is for... Reading the comments above this is clear. Metro UI is useful for Phone, Tablet, Slate, and any other type of touch interface, yes including 23 inch touchscreen LED/LCD's. This is not the only UI that will ship with Windows 8, please stop spreading FUD and acting like it is. The comments are getting stupid at this point.

Windows 8 in ARM will be metro only, that would be the reason or this office metro. but in desktops and such (who would want an ARM based desktop anyways? =_=)

but the start menu in both will be the new start menu. like i said to other person,.. some people dont think what all this new design means, they think its just a start menu, but look at Messenger, people, photo, hub they showed, games that can have multiplayer across Windows 8 and Windows phone like they showed. the new sync account thing, the new logon screen, apps that can be developed for Windows 8 and Windows phone. and the snap feature... do they want all that but without the new UI like if the new ui was an app?

so people want all these stuff and integration without the new UI? thats what i dont understand about people logic.... yeah it can be done, but it would cost more, because it would be 2 different OS then, because you would be able to set what you want to sync without the new UI. so... they would have to make a normal window option or that. which would cost time and money just because some people cant see this new UI like something good.

xendrome said,
Again, none.... well a lot of you do not understand what Metro UI is for... Reading the comments above this is clear. Metro UI is useful for Phone, Tablet, Slate, and any other type of touch interface, yes including 23 inch touchscreen LED/LCD's. This is not the only UI that will ship with Windows 8, please stop spreading FUD and acting like it is. The comments are getting stupid at this point.

Nobody here is spreading FUD (well maybe you), not a single person here (and I believe anywhere else for that matter) has claimed that Metro is the only UI that Windows 8 will ship with. It's been CLEARLY demonstrated and explained (I've watched about 20 of the sessions from build) that Metro will be the default UI that Windows boots into. But then you can drop into classic desktop if you need to run apps that are not suited for metro, or not metro aware. This is irrefutable.

everyone I've talked to so far in ther enterprise setting has told me "Microsoft would never do that they'd lose the enterprise market"..... can't wait to see their reaction to this...

Stewart Gilligan Griffin said,
everyone I've talked to so far in ther enterprise setting has told me "Microsoft would never do that they'd lose the enterprise market"..... can't wait to see their reaction to this...

Do what?

Stewart Gilligan Griffin said,

go metro on enterprise level products? like office and windows server

Microsoft BETTER go this way with enterprise products.

I imagine great line of business scenarios opened up by the Metro UI and the underlying Windows Runtime.

sexypeperodri said,
Yep, there is no turning back. Metro is here to stay. What a sad day.

And google is copying metro all the way... but i think that this for you it's ok.

sexypeperodri said,
Yep, there is no turning back. Metro is here to stay. What a sad day.

... and so is the desktop. Didn't realise being given more choice means it's a sad day

sexypeperodri said,
Yep, there is no turning back. Metro is here to stay. What a sad day.

Instead of just spouting negativity, why don't you actually try to justify why you don't like it? I strongly suspect most of the naysayers either don't understand it, or are just afraid of change and giving something new a fair shot.

sexypeperodri said,
Yep, there is no turning back. Metro is here to stay. What a sad day.

and did you already use it?... i mean try to use it not being like "oh this doesn't work"... i have it as my main OS, yeah im crazy like that because i dont really care about my computer, i use it alot, i work on it, but its not like i will die if it gives an error or something like that.
and i have used it, i have found nice features tricks, nice way to do stuff. and i have pressed every win + key possible. i have found out other stuff that i didn't care but i was like "and how is this done?"

so... have you really used it? or just see screen shots and video and think it doesn't work. or simply, use it 3 seconds and "it sucks".
i will even replace the green in start menu, it looks nice but i want it to look better.i know im a Windows fan since i have used it from 3.1 when i was a kid. but sometimes people dont even give it a real chance.

like... the idea of the design, not in the design itself. how it works, how it will work. yeah its different, but its not like something bad either. it needs some stuff to be learned since there are some buttons and features missed. but it will get better and better.


Precisely Emily, well said. Everybody is judging metro before they've even seen what app developers can do with it. The majority of what will be in the final build is still unknown at this stage, what we've seen is only a glimpse.

EmilyTheStrange said,

and did you already use it?... i mean try to use it not being like "oh this doesn't work"... i have it as my main OS, yeah im crazy like that because i dont really care about my computer, i use it alot, i work on it, but its not like i will die if it gives an error or something like that.
and i have used it, i have found nice features tricks, nice way to do stuff. and i have pressed every win + key possible. i have found out other stuff that i didn't care but i was like "and how is this done?"

so... have you really used it? or just see screen shots and video and think it doesn't work. or simply, use it 3 seconds and "it sucks".
i will even replace the green in start menu, it looks nice but i want it to look better.i know im a Windows fan since i have used it from 3.1 when i was a kid. but sometimes people dont even give it a real chance.

like... the idea of the design, not in the design itself. how it works, how it will work. yeah its different, but its not like something bad either. it needs some stuff to be learned since there are some buttons and features missed. but it will get better and better.



I know what Windows Phone 7 looks like. It looks **** and it's inefficient to use. Take a news application for example. If you want to switch between different tab (like from world news to sport news), in iPhone, all you have to do is touch the bar on the button and it directly take you to it. In Windows Phone 7, you have to swipe multiple time (not knowing how many times it takes) just to get to the tab you want. The implementation is stupid and to say Metro in Windows 8 will be any way different is wishful thinking.

So what, starting with Windows 8 you have to deal with two app versions of just about everything on the same OS?

.Neo said,
So what, starting with Windows 8 you have to deal with two app versions of just about everything on the same OS?

I'm sure there will be a choice for users to install both or any one of the versions. I, personally, will only install Metro apps when there are two options.

.Neo said,
That's not what I meant. Seems confusing as hell, not to mention messy.
well think of it as 2 OS one for ARM and one for X86 same look but different in Programs

DaRkMaDnEsS said,
well think of it as 2 OS one for ARM and one for X86 same look but different in Programs

What you say doesn't make sense. Metro applications are not only for ARM.

Gigi Buffon said,

I'm sure there will be a choice for users to install both or any one of the versions. I, personally, will only install Metro apps when there are two options.

exactly, and judging MS policy on legacy software win32 and Metro will coexist for at least a decade lol

.Neo said,
That's not what I meant. Seems confusing as hell, not to mention messy.

It doesn't have to be confusing at all. Launch word from Metro and the metro version runs, launch it from the desktop and the desktop version runs. Besides, eventually once all the apps you use support metro, alot of people will not have any reason to use the classic desktop most of the time. I look forward to the day that google chrome, outlook, wl messenger, office, games for windows and steam all have metro versions. These are the apps I use 95% of the time and I don't really see any need to use the classic desktop once they are updated with metro style.

I think that metro messenger with only a chat window at a time must be really usefull
maybe if someother want to chat with you, you can simpli slide all the metro application until you find the right one

it's the apple sindrome

fehu said,
I think that metro messenger with only a chat window at a time must be really usefull
maybe if someother want to chat with you, you can simpli slide all the metro application until you find the right one

it's the apple sindrome


That's kind of down to the developers though... who says that metro panes can't have multiple tabs or whatever... lets just wait and see what developers can do with it before making our minds up shall we?

TCLN Ryster said,
Besides, eventually once all the apps you use support metro, alot of people will not have any reason to use the classic desktop most of the time.

Like how all apps use a native interface on Windows, have proper 256 x 256 icons, don't use legacy interface elements etc.? Oh wait...

.Neo said,
So what, starting with Windows 8 you have to deal with two app versions of just about everything on the same OS?

An app can have one install and run 2 UI's if it wanted. One can be simple and the other can be advanced,. Look at control panel as an example, click on "more options" in the metro control panel takes you to the desktop one that has everything. That option can apply to any app if a dev wants to do it that way.

fehu said,
I think that metro messenger with only a chat window at a time must be really usefull
maybe if someother want to chat with you, you can simpli slide all the metro application until you find the right one

it's the apple sindrome

Why would metro messanger only have one chat window at a time? You forget that you can move left and right inside metro apps, thus you can have a list of users online in the right or left of the screen, then use the rest of the screen to move between chats that are tabbed up at the top. Simple and it works. There are a few ways to do a mutli "window" app in metro, you just have to think about it a bit, but it's possible.

Name one app, any app, that you think can't be done as a full screen metro UI and I bet you it can, with a little thinking.

AtriusNY said,

What you say doesn't make sense. Metro applications are not only for ARM.

Exactly.

ARM - only runs Metro apps
x86 - runs both Metro & x86 apps

GP007 said,

Name one app, any app, that you think can't be done as a full screen metro UI and I bet you it can, with a little thinking.

my problem is the full screen one window no taskbar paradigm
you can use some gimmick to overcome this limitations, but it always be awkward

fehu said,

my problem is the full screen one window no taskbar paradigm
you can use some gimmick to overcome this limitations, but it always be awkward

Honestly a tasbar inside the start screen could be added if MS wanted to. When you're inside the start screen itself and move your mouse down to the lower left which brings up the charm menu and the time+date there is space for a taskbar to also pop up, It could just be the same row of tiles for open apps OR a better option would be to have it be a row of tab preview windows for each app. Honestly though i've used lotts of UI's without a taskbar, GNOME is one etc, in that case when you do the same thing, move your mouse to the designated corner of the screen, it brings up the dock with your pinned apps (more or less like the win7 taskbar, but to that end so is the start menu with it's tiles) and it also brings up a expose like preview of your open apps so you click on the one you want.

Maybe i'm just use to working without a taskbar in the end. I just alt+tab all the time really.

Office for Metro sounds very attractive to me.

Will there be two Offices, one for slates and one for Desktop?
I hope they come bundled together, or are one software like the desktop/Immersive. And you can switch between them.

FMH said,
Office for Metro sounds very attractive to me.

Will there be two Offices, one for slates and one for Desktop?
I hope they come bundled together, or are one software like the desktop/Immersive. And you can switch between them.


I suspect, or at least I hope that Metro office will just be a "mode" of Office 15 and not a separate product. That way if people choose to remain in the desktop they don't need a different product to those that choose to remain in Metro.

TCLN Ryster said,

I suspect, or at least I hope that Metro office will just be a "mode" of Office 15 and not a separate product. That way if people choose to remain in the desktop they don't need a different product to those that choose to remain in Metro.
Yeah, it will most likely be the case.

Just look at IE in Win8 - the Metro and Classic version are the same, it's just the Metro version disables plugins and has a different interface. It will be the same with Office - they'll both install together, with users being able to choose which they want to use. If not then Microsoft has completely lost the plot.

Rohdekill said,
As I expected... they will now expect everyone to spend hundreds to upgrade current, perfectly good software.

? Don't they always? Isn't that how major new versions of software work?

~Johnny said,

? Don't they always? Isn't that how major new versions of software work?

Nope not always. Take linux for example and other free projects

~Johnny said,

? Don't they always? Isn't that how major new versions of software work?

And if you have non-ARM (standard x32 or x64 CPUs) hardware, you need not upgrade your current version of Office - even if you choose Immersive as your default UI, as Office 2010 runs just fine. This is an ARM-specifc, not Immersive-specific, issue; however, adapting Office to support Immersive's feature set, ARM or no ARM, still makes sense merely from a productivity point of view.

On Immersive itself - it *is* usable on standard desktops, though it may not be everyone's cup of tea. (Heck, there may be users of tablets, slates, and other touch-supporting form-factors that prefer a touch-enabled version of the Windows-typical UI, as opposed to Metro/Immersive.) It's all about user choice - the Start menu is not in danger yet.

Critical Error said,
What is linux??

You don't know what Linux is?? Is the name of a pinguin, which is the character of a TV cartoon show on TV that I've never seen!

Rohdekill said,
As I expected... they will now expect everyone to spend hundreds to upgrade current, perfectly good software.

I see no reason why you can't run your current version of Office '95 on an x86 emulator, on an ARM version of Windows.

daniel_rh said,

You don't know what Linux is?? Is the name of a pinguin, which is the character of a TV cartoon show on TV that I've never seen!

I get Pingu and Linux mixed up all the time!

Rohdekill said,
As I expected... they will now expect everyone to spend hundreds to upgrade current, perfectly good software.
As always, there is someone demanding someone else pays to maintain an antiquated and insecure platform cause their code is "perfect" and there is no reason to progress it.

Great sentence:

“You have potentially an Office solution that's ‘real Office', and you have all these Metro style apps; you almost start thinking, at what point is it not confusing anymore?”