Microsoft adds 200GB SkyDrive option for $100 a year

Earlier today, Microsoft announce that people who decide to purchase the new Surface 2 and Surface Pro 2 tablets would get 200GB of free storage on SkyDrive for two years. But what about everyone else who won't be buying the new tablets? Thankfully, Microsoft has also given them the option to get that new 200GB storage option.

In a post on the official SkyDrive blog, Microsoft announced the new 200GB storage limit can be bought for $100 a year. The previous storage limit was 100GB, which costs $50. "Just to put that in context: 200 GB is enough space to take a photo, every hour, from the moment someone is born, to the day they graduate from college," the blog post states.

The new upper storage limit will be welcomed by many folks, especially heavy photo users who can quickly maximize the free 7GB limit on SkyDrive. This news comes even as Microsoft has to change the name of SkyDrive itself in the very near future, as the company recently lost a court battle in the UK where the Sky TV network claimed the SkyDrive name violated its trademark. Microsoft has not indicated when that change will take place.

Source: Microsoft

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Still cheaper, more practical to buy 2 External HDD's. At least you don't have to cope with slow upload/download speeds and you have files all the time.

I do get the point in online storage but I don't think the infrastructure is available everyplace just yet. Many slow connections still around so at the moment i would opt for some external drives unless you plan on sharing what you upload ofc.

Spicoli said,
I might consider Skydrive except no Linux client. That comes in very handy for keeping development servers and windows desktops synced.

Tell me about it, still can't believe there isn't one yet.

LOL, Baidu Cloud Drive in China gives you 2TB free, only thing you need to do is to install their "housekeeper" apps in your smart phone.

Why not give it for free? It assures the Republic of China easy access to consumer data! Instead of infiltrating a network, they allow the network to get centralized for them!

I buy the 125GB option. But I only use it as another backup method in addition to on-site backups. I figure why not 1 in the cloud? I still have 47GB free, so in a couple of years I'll upgrade to the 200GB option.

They do need to hurry up and increase the 2 gig single file size limit.... with storage capacities like this they want you to put everything up there but I have a bunch of hd video and my iso backups that I would like put up there and finally retire my home server.

Monthly residential broadband bandwidth caps (e.g. 250GB/mo @ AT&T U-Verse) would hurt impacted consumer's budgets! They would reach their bandwidth caps sooner just by simply transmitting a few local backup images into SkyDrive... then they'd sue Msft directly for their overages!

(I do realize, however, that MSFT struck a deal recently with AT&T which could exempt households from the bandwidth caps by piggy-backing U-Verse traffic directly into MSFT's cloud w/o floating on the public 'net.)

Nas said,
Monthly residential broadband bandwidth caps (e.g. 250GB/mo @ AT&T U-Verse) would hurt impacted consumer's budgets! They would reach their bandwidth caps sooner just by simply transmitting a few local backup images into SkyDrive... then they'd sue Msft directly for their overages!

(I do realize, however, that MSFT struck a deal recently with AT&T which could exempt households from the bandwidth caps by piggy-backing U-Verse traffic directly into MSFT's cloud w/o floating on the public 'net.)

I would only be a one time deal to get stuff up there.... then you only access the files as you need them. It wouldn't be downloading the whole storage drive each month.

I wished they after more tiers 350,400, half a terabyte, 1 TB, 2 TB, 3TB, 4TB, 5 TB, 10 TB, up to 20 TB.

and make the current ones cheaper.

By the time their offer expires (2015), I'm pretty sure online storage price will be a lot lower than today's. I hope so.

What? Who finds this useful in the first place? On sight copies are still way more trusty than anything on cloud and for 100 bucks I could get an 2TB drive already.

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
What? Who finds this useful in the first place? On sight copies are still way more trusty than anything on cloud and for 100 bucks I could get an 2TB drive already.

It's not always just about backups. It's a hell of a lot more convenient than carrying a drive around with you, especially when it can be accessed on any device no matter where you are. Besides, a good backup plan also includes an offsite copy as well.

Well sure, I mean I used Skydrive with my WP all the time to store my documents and pictures on there, even have an copy of my website there but 200GB for $100/y, might be just me but I don't really see much use for it for that kind of money.

Wondering if they start to intergrate it more with Xbox One might be a need as data Sync goes on and on,

I use my one to store backups of my save games etc from my PC along with a cloud version of my images, True you can store it all on a drive for the same price but cloud means its 'safer' and accessible whenever

Doesn't work for everyone but it has its places, like sharing between friends etc

That's the thing. You never know when the servers would be in trouble and can't maybe access your files on the worst moment imaginable. Safer? Could you elaborate a bit?

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
That's the thing. You never know when the servers would be in trouble and can't maybe access your files on the worst moment imaginable. Safer? Could you elaborate a bit?

Your house can burn down. It happens. And your on-site backups will be meaningless.

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
That's the thing. You never know when the servers would be in trouble and can't maybe access your files on the worst moment imaginable. Safer? Could you elaborate a bit?

If only they had a desktop client that synced all of your files offline...oh...wait.
I'm sure the functionality is coming to wp soon as well.

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
That's the thing. You never know when the servers would be in trouble and can't maybe access your files on the worst moment imaginable. Safer? Could you elaborate a bit?

I never said Safe, I said safer, nothing is 100% safe, your $99 2TB hard drive could have a mechanical fault and render the whole thing useless then have to source data recovery which could reach into $100's or $1,000's if it is even possible.

Cloud is the 'safest' but when the net goes off, all that safety does go out with it...

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
That's the thing. You never know when the servers would be in trouble and can't maybe access your files on the worst moment imaginable. Safer? Could you elaborate a bit?

you would sync the data, simple! Having all your pics and docs seamlessly sync to cheap cloud storage (where it can sync to any of your other machines as well) is very handy.

1: its another copy of my data offsite
2: it lets me access my stuff when i don't have my computer to hand
3: when using my computer, i always use the local versions of file which then resync upon save
4: it allows me to have the same files on my multiple computers
5: its cheaper than both dropbox and icloud, and has more features that i use
6: office web apps are available to open any of my office files from any computer / tablet i have in front of me
7: access to all this on my phone as well
8: i also have xbox music pass, and with my music synced on skydrive it gives me the same functionality as apple provides with its mmusic matching thingy (i forget the iname)

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
What? Who finds this useful in the first place? On sight copies are still way more trusty than anything on cloud and for 100 bucks I could get an 2TB drive already.

It doesn't even take many years of this to buy both a hard drive + a NAS so that you get your personal cloud too. Enormous flexibility in what you run on that service too, compared to SkyDrive. Decent NAS solutions also offer auto-backups as a basic feature. My NAS supports auto-backups to off-site locations too, depending on how serious you are.

Heck, this is even worth it even for the non-cloud storage benefits, if only for auto-backed up WiFi storage at home.

Edited by Northgrove, Sep 24 2013, 10:03am :

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
What? Who finds this useful in the first place? On sight copies are still way more trusty than anything on cloud and for 100 bucks I could get an 2TB drive already.
I for one do. I have 30 years worth of home videos and family photos that I share. Using this service I don't have lug ANY device around and can access it from anywhere.

If you buy one of these options, fill it up and then cease payments, what happens to the files? Can you still at least download them?

Also, **** Sky and Rupert Murdoch. Atrocious decisions by our UK courts.

djpailo said,
If you buy one of these options, fill it up and then cease payments, what happens to the files? Can you still at least download them?

I sincerely doubt it.

djpailo said,
If you buy one of these options, fill it up and then cease payments, what happens to the files? Can you still at least download them?

Also, **** Sky and Rupert Murdoch. Atrocious decisions by our UK courts.


That shouldn't be an issue though, because you'd keep this storage in sync locally anyway (why not local storage is cheap, and if you didn't then you'd need to fill up that 200GB via the web interface manually which would be a pain.

so i would say its a none issue, if you stop paying you simply lose the cloud copy of your data.

i keep all my docs/pics/music synced between laptop, desktop and cloud with the 100GB option and its great!

I've heard that when the subscription expires, you lose the ability to update your online files; access to them isn't cut off (at least, within some grace period in case you want to renew).

Relativity_17 said,
I've heard that when the subscription expires, you lose the ability to update your online files; access to them isn't cut off (at least, within some grace period in case you want to renew).

get ready for a shock, you stop paying for a subscription service.........service stops working! Wow i know, who'd have thought it?

duddit2 said,

That shouldn't be an issue though, because you'd keep this storage in sync locally anyway (why not local storage is cheap, and if you didn't then you'd need to fill up that 200GB via the web interface manually which would be a pain.

so i would say its a none issue, if you stop paying you simply lose the cloud copy of your data.

i keep all my docs/pics/music synced between laptop, desktop and cloud with the 100GB option and its great!

I'm not sure I see the usefulness of this. I mean if I have a local store then why do I need a cloud store? Especially one that I have to pay into perpetuity to ensure I have access to it and that it isn't purged. You could get the same results storing your files on a "private cloud" NAS device without the annual fees.

I guess I just don't understand why people are so happy to add yet another bill to their monthly expenses...

LogicalApex said,

I'm not sure I see the usefulness of this. I mean if I have a local store then why do I need a cloud store?

Computer is stolen, hard drive dies, fire, flood etc. It's an offsite automated backup.

BoondockSaint said,

Computer is stolen, hard drive dies, fire, flood etc. It's an offsite automated backup.

This can be accomplished for a lot cheaper...

* Backup to an external HDD and plop it into your desk at work (free)
* Same as above, but drop the external HDD into a bank deposit box (<$20/y)
* Etc...

And you have the security of your data being accessible when you need it. Microsoft could be experiencing a SkyDrive outage when you badly need to restore a file due to those reasons you cited above. You could also have Internet Access that is too slow to facilitate a timely restore of your data...

I guess this stuff is a lot like cell phone insurance. You're paying for piece of mind and not actual use.

LogicalApex said,

This can be accomplished for a lot cheaper...

* Backup to an external HDD and plop it into your desk at work (free)
* Same as above, but drop the external HDD into a bank deposit box (<$20/y)
* Etc...

And you have the security of your data being accessible when you need it. Microsoft could be experiencing a SkyDrive outage when you badly need to restore a file due to those reasons you cited above. You could also have Internet Access that is too slow to facilitate a timely restore of your data...

I guess this stuff is a lot like cell phone insurance. You're paying for piece of mind and not actual use.


Because it's easier for people who aren't technically adept as we are to install a home NAS.

LogicalApex said,

This can be accomplished for a lot cheaper...

Of course, but it still depends on what you need. I have a NAS, use external drives, but I also use cloud backups for certain things - things I want/need to have instant access to elsewhere.

For example (and this is not massive usage that would require a paid account), whenever I leave for a trip, I put PDF versions of all my hotel confirmations, etickets and so forth in my cloud folder. This folder is set to be an 'offline' folder, so that it automatically syncs to my phone and I have access to those documents on the road, even without net access.

Yes I can have them on a pendrive or portable drive, but it also means instant access without having to get my laptop out.

I find cloud services as just another level of convenience when it comes to doing things away from my main machine.

Not good. Microsoft needs to risk predatory pricing and offer 1TB for 100 a year.

I already subscribe to Crashplan. Sure skydrive could be more useful, and is more useful. At 100 / year for 1TB, I'll bite, until then, no thanks.

ObiWanToby said,
Not good. Microsoft needs to risk predatory pricing and offer 1TB for 100 a year.

I already subscribe to Crashplan. Sure skydrive could be more useful, and is more useful. At 100 / year for 1TB, I'll bite, until then, no thanks.

Half the price of DropBox. I don't really understand why you're comparing Skydrive to Crashplan.

How can risking predatory pricing be a good thing?

Also, as MrHumpty stated, SkyDrive doesn't compare to Crashplan. Sure, SkyDrive can be leveraged for that use-case, but it's not designed for that use-case... Google Drive is actually Goog's stab at mimicking SkyDrive's capabilities, although SkyDrive satisfies more use-case scenarios than even G Drive does.