Microsoft admits "high impact issues" in Vista -- SP1 coming

Microsoft has admitted -- in a roundabout way -- that Vista has "high impact issues". It has put out a call for technical testers to participate in testing of Service Pack 1, due out later this year, which will address "regressions from Windows Vista and Windows XP, security, deployment blockers and other high impact issues."

It's hard to know whether to be reassured that Service Pack 1 is coming, and thus that there's now a sensible timeframe for considering deployment of Vista within businesses, OR to be alarmed that Microsoft is unleashing an OS on the world with "high impact issues" remaining in it.

In other news there's a battle raging over the top 10 reasons to get / not to get Vista. (And a rebuttal.)

News source: APCMag.com

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48 Comments

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There is one known issue which nails a lot of people with 4 GB of RAM where Windows won't install, you need to install with 2 GB of RAM and then re-install the other 2 GB. How the HELL did that get past quality assurance?

Fact is, Vista is usable and much better than XP right now.


You seem to be confused about whats is fact and what is considered to be an opinion.
The only fact to that statement is your inability to differentiate between the two.

ha i will believe it when i see it if this goes anything like the visual studio 2005 SP1 then it will be longer then second half 2007... VS2005 said they would have a SP1 out within the 1st half year, it took over a year!

Reason number 10 on that guy's list to get Vista: "Face it, you have no choice."

GG

Does this guy get PAID to write this stuff?

At least there is honesty, Apple probably does the same thing but sells it as an 'upgrade' how many of those OSX upgrades have been SPs? I wonder......

Vista runs fine, it is much better than XP and certainly gives OSX a run for its money, I use both and I still fell that with OSX I can only do what Jobs considers I should be doing with a mac, not what I want....

diabulos said,
At least there is honesty, Apple probably does the same thing but sells it as an 'upgrade' how many of those OSX upgrades have been SPs? I wonder......

Vista runs fine, it is much better than XP and certainly gives OSX a run for its money, I use both and I still fell that with OSX I can only do what Jobs considers I should be doing with a mac, not what I want....


Wow. The level of douchebagness in those two paragraphs is unparalleled.

I can do everything I wanted to do with my PC on my Mac. Not only that, but usually the quality of software on a Mac is much higher. For instance, TextMate is one of the best text editors I've ever used. Same for Transmit and FTP.

diabulos said,
At least there is honesty, Apple probably does the same thing but sells it as an 'upgrade' how many of those OSX upgrades have been SPs? I wonder......

Vista runs fine, it is much better than XP and certainly gives OSX a run for its money, I use both and I still fell that with OSX I can only do what Jobs considers I should be doing with a mac, not what I want....


Have you even used OS X other than a demo in a store? Seriously, there isn't anything you can't do in OS X that you can do in Windows (don't even mention games, we all know, and until *you* actually write games, it isn't the point. it is possible to write games for OS X, most just don't). I'd argue that you can do more since OS X comes with excellent developer's tools.

Back on topic: Is anyone really surprised? I'm not. Still upgrading to Ultimate to test the waters, though. I'm probably savvy enough to handle its glitches should I encounter any.

funny but sad that this is pretty much true for the most part, unless you use OSX 100% of the time...

Quote - top 10 reason to get vista
10. Face it, you have no choice
When Microsoft brings out a major renovation to Windows, you can choose to ignore it for a year or two, but then the device drivers start drying up for older versions of Windows, your friends start asking questions about their new PC that you can't answer, and even if you use Linux, you'll inevitably need familiarity with Microsoft's latest interoperability blockers. Face it: your arse belongs to Redmond.

Believing anything APCmag has to say is almost like believing what Slashdot has to say.

"Ask me no questions, I'll tell you no lies."

Well what do you expect them to stand still and not doing anything for two years and then do something?

Vista has been feature complete for over a year while work on longhorn server continues to add stability and features.

They have most likely also started working on the next operating system.

They are thinking about Lost season 5, which I guess means the rest of season 3 and season 4 fall under the same category as whatever you might have been implying.

Blah.

They are allowed to think about SP1 once Windows hit's RTM arnt they? It RTMed back in November and alot of businesses and MSDN users have been able to use it from that date.

So personally just becasue it's not in the shops for another week is not an issue imo.

There are only "high impact issues" in a business rollout, but thats not really a issue since most business won't rollout Vista until 2008. These "high impact issues" are not there in customer install.

"OR to be alarmed that Microsoft is unleashing an OS on the world with "high impact issues" remaining in it."

Please don't sensationalise. SP1 is being produced to to make Vista appealing to the "I'm not getting Vista until SP1" crowd... so SP2 should be due mid-2008.

I've been runnning Vista since RTM availability on MSDN and it has been pretty smooth. As someone who spends time in Visual Studio 2005 and runs as a non-admin it has the odd quirk here and there, but certainly no "high impact" show stoppers.

The bottom line is if no one takes the plunge how will we ever identify the things that need to be fixed to make it a better experience? I think it's the responsibility of the technical user community as a whole to be early adopters to iron out the blips before the non-technical users get too deep into it. And besides -- you know that you are going to get a call one of these days from your [insert relationship name here - mom, dad, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, grandparent, friend, boss, co-worker etc...] asking you how to work with it. The world moves on and will shift away from XP just like we shifted from Windows 3.1 and as we try hard to put the Windows 9x/Me era to rest.

colinbo said,
I've been runnning Vista since RTM availability on MSDN and it has been pretty smooth. As someone who spends time in Visual Studio 2005 and runs as a non-admin it has the odd quirk here and there, but certainly no "high impact" show stoppers.

The bottom line is if no one takes the plunge how will we ever identify the things that need to be fixed to make it a better experience? I think it's the responsibility of the technical user community as a whole to be early adopters to iron out the blips before the non-technical users get too deep into it. And besides -- you know that you are going to get a call one of these days from your [insert relationship name here - mom, dad, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, grandparent, friend, boss, co-worker etc...] asking you how to work with it. The world moves on and will shift away from XP just like we shifted from Windows 3.1 and as we try hard to put the Windows 9x/Me era to rest.

Same here - I find my VS2005 workday a darn sight nicer on the new OS it feels pretty snappy compared to XP.
I wonder if people judge Vista based on the original public beta? It's a million miles away from that build folks..

MightyJordan said,
Well you can't achieve perfection the first time. This will bring Microsoft one step closer to the perfect OS.

dream on , there is no such thing and there woint be such a thing ever becuase nothing is ever perfect

...and on the right hand side of these articles its got

"We all know that one day Linux will rule the world, but there's a lot of work to do to make it happen. So join me as I explore the depths of Linux one command line at a time."

GREAT site

Hmm i dont care about linux,so u will die waiting linux to rule the world

The only way linux could rule the world,lets say,in about 50 years,is that MS decides to stop making OS as core business

What did you smoke?

Oh every Linux fan thinks it will one day rule the world. Every year is supposed to be the "year of Linux" but it never will be. As much as they hate to admint it, Windows is just too popular. (And by 'popular' I mean over 80% of users freely and willingly chose to purchase it or buy a computer that came with it)

If "we all know" that Linux will rule the world then this guy obviously has zero friends.

There are other ways for revolutions to happen. You youngins probably don't remember, but there was a time before Wintel. Companies like Fairchild Semiconductor, Bell Labs, IBM, DEC, Wang and TI ruled the technology battlefield. It doesn't take much to start a new revolution. With one small, probably unforeseeable action, MS could very easily get lost in the fog just like other companies before them.

I'm not saying that the demise of MS would be a good thing... competition is vital to the health of our industry because it drives innovation and efficiency. Competition is also very good for the end consumer... but if you study history, you'll realize it's not smart to put all of your eggs in the same basket.

To get back on topic, I know that the internal IT division at my company (MS Gold Certified Partner) will not even look at Vista until at least SP2. I know of many other institutions that feel the same way. News like this helps justify their position.

Linux will start it's quest on "ruling" the world the day it becomes a choice as an Operating System for modern day computers in stores. Even if it wasn't the default, the money consumers would be saving (I could see it now: New HP Laptop: $899 with XP, $649 with linux) would make them "cheap-out" and switch

Sorry to flush your party there Ibm mouse,but that was other circumstances,the Tech market was new,today we have a well stablished IT tech market

This are 2 different circumstances

lbmouse said,
To get back on topic, I know that the internal IT division at my company (MS Gold Certified Partner) will not even look at Vista until at least SP2. I know of many other institutions that feel the same way. News like this helps justify their position.

Not to rain on your parade, but doesn't that comment sort of make your IT division 'ashamed' to be a Partner of MS? Not touching their products until a while down the line with SP2, and not earlier?

tazzeh said,
Not to rain on your parade, but doesn't that comment sort of make your IT division 'ashamed' to be a Partner of MS? Not touching their products until a while down the line with SP2, and not earlier?

No, our company is in the business to make money, not to appease any one particular vendor (like MS). It's not my decision, but apparently the powers-that-be understand the ramifications of relying on a platform that has not been thoroughly battlefield tested. I'm fortunate to work for such a company. I'm given the freedom to provide my developers with the best tools for the job. Here's a little secret... shhhh!... it isn't always a Microsoft product.

EduardValencia said,
Sorry to flush your party there Ibm mouse,but that was other circumstances,the Tech market was new,today we have a well stablished IT tech market

This are 2 different circumstances


Nope, the tech market is still very much in it's infancy. Just because it's been around longer than you, doesn't make it old and/or established. Now to answer your question, hmm... I really really wish I could. I'd be a billionaire if I knew of the exact circumstances. The only thing that IS for certain is that nothing is for certain. BTW - it's 'LB' mouse.

Fact is, Vista is usable and much better than XP right now.

A service pack can only make it far more superior, I can see why people are putting this in a negative spin - but personally I think its quite positive.

sin-ergy said,
Eh, currently, XP > Vista. In a few years, MAYBE, you can reiterate what you just said.

Vista (6.0) > XP (5.1)

excalpius said,
Actually, I'd call Vista as XP 5.5 and it should have been priced as such.
There's nothing v6 about it.

Not your decision

Juding from the article, and from my own personal Vista use, SP1 will be focussing on:

  • Integrating any security patches made available between now and release
  • Minor bugs (mostly avoidable or unproblamatic glitches, not serious showstoppers)
  • Fixing any bugs that break obscure applications (particularly applications from the corporate sector)
  • Solve any business rollout issues
In other words, not really any consumer orientated fixes other than security updates. Vista is more ready than any other Microsoft OS I've seen (and I've seen them all). The RTM doesn't have any showstoppers and is stable. There are UI glitches and minor bugs (particularly in bundled applications, Media Player, Media Center, etc.). Overall howver, it is (in my mind) the best version of Windows made so far.

All these "high impact issues", most of which were reported during the beta but closed as "Wont Fix" or "By Design" or "Other"... Heaven forbid they miss their release date. Early in the beta, Bill Gates publically said that the release of Vista would be determined by product readyness and not a arbitrary pre-determined date... yeah right.

Hmm that's made me less wanting to get it lol.

I was told by many reviewers and other people that there would not be any bad issues wit the new one - hardly any bugs and much improved security...."high impact issues" does not seem "secure" to me.....

Its new software, and as always, there will be bugs. There will always be bugs and holes in software (heck, look at how many patches have been released for XP over the years).

What's worrying is that most of these bugs were found in testing. Some Microsoft cant fix, and some they can, but "wont" fix.