Microsoft announces Office 2013 pricing

Today Microsoft has taken the wraps off the pricing for Office 2013, with new subscription packages under the Office 365 brand being the main feature. These subscription packages start at $99.99 per year (or $8.33 per month) with Office 365 Home Premium, which gives you access to all Office 2013 applications such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher and Access.

As well as access to the traditional Office suite, you also get to use Office on up to five computers (PC or Mac), you get access to on-demand streaming versions of Office, an extra 20 GB of SkyDrive storage and 60 minutes of Skype world calling.

For businesses there's Office 365 Small Business Premium, which includes Lync and InfoPath alongside the traditional apps, plus HD video conferencing, shared calendars, a 25 GB mailbox and 10 GB of SharePoint storage - all for $149.99 per user per year, with each subscription being valid on up to five PCs.

Here's a breakdown of those prices:

  • Office 365 Home Premium ($99.99 per year): Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher, Access; Office on Demand (streaming); extra 20 GB of SkyDrive storage; 60 minutes of Skype world calling
  • Office 365 Small Business Premium ($149.99 per year): Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher, Access, Lync, InfoPath; Office on Demand (streaming); shared calendars; 25 GB mailbox; 10 GB of SharePoint storage (+ additional 500 MB per user); HD video conferencing and screen sharing; free public-facing business website

Of course if you're not the sort of person who likes to purchase a subscription to software, there will be standalone versions available, although you lose a number of features you get in the subscription packages such as extra SkyDrive space and streaming apps. Here's a breakdown of the standalone packages.

  • Home & Student ($139.99): Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote
  • Home & Business ($219.99): Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook
  • Professional ($399.99): Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher, Access

These standalone licenses are only valid on one PC, and are a price increase of 10-17% from current Office 2010 prices. Microsoft has stated that the subscription models will be updated with new capabilities "multiple times per year", which the standalone packages apparently will not receive.

Microsoft also confirmed the Office 2013 upgrade program we saw last week. If you purchase a copy of Office 2010 between October 19th, 2012 and April 30th, 2013 you will be eligible to receive a complementary upgrade to the equivalent version of Office 2013, or an Office 365 one year subscription, when it's available.

Finally, Microsoft hasn't announced when Office 2013 will be available to the public, although they have mentioned it will be available in 277 markets in over 70 currencies. Rather than going the traditional boxed copy route, Microsoft will be offering a Product Key Card where you will need to download Office to use.

Source: Office BlogZDNet, The Verge

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62 Comments

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Price hike Price hike. So they are punishing you by charging almost 20% more for non subscribers and limiting to one pc or mac only. Ouch. These prices must be from someone who must think money grows on trees. I'll gladly skip this version and use previous versions because of no stinkin subscription. My users will also skip this version and either use: Office 2003-2010 or LibreOffice(Open Source sweet)

drazgoosh said,
These prices seem a bit steep, though I got to say I'm enjoying my experience with the 2013 Preview.

I agree. Those prices are too steep for my tastes. They should give students a far lower cost like half of what they are asking.

the420kid said,
from the look of it my users will be on win7 and office 2007 for a LONG time to come

Sounds like you have no wish to spend money at all - since you're still on Office 2007. How many add-ins do you use (because you have to)? Note that Office 2013 does not require Windows 8; further, like Office 2010, an x64 version is available (not the case with Office 2007). I no longer need ANY add-ins (Word supports PDF editing directly, Outlook supports Hotmail/Outlook.com directly, etc.).

PGHammer said,

Sounds like you have no wish to spend money at all - since you're still on Office 2007. How many add-ins do you use (because you have to)? Note that Office 2013 does not require Windows 8; further, like Office 2010, an x64 version is available (not the case with Office 2007). I no longer need ANY add-ins (Word supports PDF editing directly, Outlook supports Hotmail/Outlook.com directly, etc.).

The 420kid likely wouldn't be paying for the upgrade, his clients would be. If his "users" are in-house, the company he works for would have to pay for the upgrades. not him. My company just started rolling out Office 2010. Considering the expense and work involved in these upgrades, we won't be spending money willy-nilly just to have the latest version of Office. In my experience, very few companies would do so, especially considering today's economy. Even back when things were better, most companies stayed at least one release behind the latest versions of Office. I don't see that changing, certainly for the limited advantages Office 2013 offers.

As for the 32-bit vs. 64-bit versions of Office 2010, I have experimented with both. While I like the idea of 64-bit software, the user experience between the two for users is virtually identical.

Small Business is limited to 10 persons rather than to incomes. But even $150 is still impossible for a small business on emerging markets.

coth said,
Small Business is limited to 10 persons rather than to incomes. But even $150 is still impossible for a small business on emerging markets.

That's MS for ya. If they were apple then it would be $900 instead of $150.

MsftGaurav said,
Ribbon+Metro? No thanks.

Office 365/2013 does NOT require the ModernUI; it doesn't even require Windows 8 (it's perfectly usable on Windows 7). The lengths some folks will go to spread FUD....

I see the price increasing with each version... I've buy a 3 licence pack Retail copy of home and Student 2007 with 49 USD. I did't buy a similar 2010 licence with 119 USD, but now 139 ??? And except 365 I see no mention of how many computers are licensed...

eiffel_g said,
I see the price increasing with each version... I've buy a 3 licence pack Retail copy of home and Student 2007 with 49 USD. I did't buy a similar 2010 licence with 119 USD, but now 139 ??? And except 365 I see no mention of how many computers are licensed...

Up to five - therefore $20USD/PC/year. Over the four-year upgrade cycle, that's $80USD/PC; does it make better sense?

PGHammer said,

Up to five - therefore $20USD/PC/year. Over the four-year upgrade cycle, that's $80USD/PC; does it make better sense?


It's still unacceptable. Give a better deal or users won't buy into it(the smart ones)

primexx said,
wait, home & student at the same price but for 2 fewer computers? they can't be serious.

They are. They are hoping that the increased price will persuade you to move to the cheaper sub, but then they got you locked in. imo i'd never do that. Let me decide not some stinkin company. I know whats best and not you.

For once, I'm actually interested in the subscription idea. However, when I consider their snooping stance on data, it quickly becomes less appealing, but not impossible. Depends on how it pans out as a whole of course.

Hahaiah said,
For once, I'm actually interested in the subscription idea. However, when I consider their snooping stance on data, it quickly becomes less appealing, but not impossible. Depends on how it pans out as a whole of course.

and is also a reason certain market sectors wont touch it with a bargepole, I know we wont be entertaining the subs model/cloud storage for 2 reasons, data security and data retention on our confidential and controlled documentation (work in biomed research) for a multinational healthcare company.

Currently planning/implementing a Lotus Domino--->exchange 2k10 migration, the upgrade potential on the 200 Licences Ive to purchase in the next couple of months could be neat though

If I can write it off as a business expense, I might give the subscription model a try, but I think I will probably just end up getting the DSP version, as always.

Using the preview, I can't see many changes from 2010, but I do like the smooth scrolling - just feels nicer to use.

jasonon said,
jeeze $100 a year just to use office? $25 maybe...

Well, 5 computers for $100 per year works out at $20 a computer...

xankazo said,
Home & Student ($139.99) it's enough for me.

that's outrageous. $90 would be a more reasonable cost. $110 for a sub but allow 3 pc's or macs.

Slight correction: I believe Home and Student can be installed on up to three computers. It was the case for Office 2007.

Denis W said,
Slight correction: I believe Home and Student can be installed on up to three computers. It was the case for Office 2007.

They specifically said 1 PC because they're trying to push the subscriptions

Scorpus said,

They specifically said 1 PC because they're trying to push the subscriptions

An that is the reason why the price increase is much higher than the 10/17% mentioned in the article.

Scorpus said,

They specifically said 1 PC because they're trying to push the subscriptions


A subscription just for the privilege for using office is plain wrong and a pure waste of money. i'd rather puke on them and say "You Fail and lol at you for making my day".

soldier1st said,

A subscription just for the privilege for using office is plain wrong and a pure waste of money. i'd rather puke on them and say "You Fail and lol at you for making my day".

Not really if you have more than three computers.

Which is unfortunate as I only have two. Well two that do any work; two others if you include HTPCs.

What's the difference between the Professional (399$) and the Home Premium (99$)?
In 4 years we have Office 2015 or 2017. What's the point of this offer?

Lastwebpage said,
What's the difference between the Professional (399$) and the Home Premium (99$)?
In 4 years we have Office 2015 or 2017. What's the point of this offer?

I'd assume that you'd be upgraded to the newest version of Office automatically with this subscription. That's how it works with Office 365 currently.

Omen1393 said,

I'd assume that you'd be upgraded to the newest version of Office automatically with this subscription. That's how it works with Office 365 currently.


Yes, maybe, but who would buy the pro version instead of a 4 years subscription? What's the benefit of this pro version? I guess I overlook something.

Omen1393 said,

I'd assume that you'd be upgraded to the newest version of Office automatically with this subscription. That's how it works with Office 365 currently.

As far as applications go, basically it's SharePoint Server/SkyDrive Pro (deployed on the company server or a cloud service, such as Azure) and Lync (corporate messaging) - neither is a good fit for home usage. Other than that, in terms of the applications themselves, the difference is, in fact, nil.

Lastwebpage said,
What's the difference between the Professional (399$) and the Home Premium (99$)?
In 4 years we have Office 2015 or 2017. What's the point of this offer?

The cost is 4 times what the $99 costs.

greenwizard88 said,
99/year is a lot for a glorified notepad for many people. I really do wonder how the subscription pricing will work out.

It will work out very well from what I see. Obviously this is not geared for people who think it's a glorified notepad. For the millions of other business professionals, this sounds great. I am getting the Small Business subscription as soon as it is available. I am currently using the preview and I'm extremely happy with it.

Obry said,

It will work out very well from what I see. Obviously this is not geared for people who think it's a glorified notepad. For the millions of other business professionals, this sounds great. I am getting the Small Business subscription as soon as it is available. I am currently using the preview and I'm extremely happy with it.

Also, look at Office365 Home Premium; it's the Core Seven Office applications (it's basically the streaming version of Office 2013 Professional Plus). And it's $99.99 per YEAR - for up to five devices (PCs, Macs, or combos thereof). As long as Office doesn't stretch to a five year upgrade schedule, such a subscription will pay for itself in a year if your family has a mere THREE PCs and Macs - if they have more, it pays for itself faster - not slower.

Office Pro is $399, you get all the programs in Office 365 for $99 per year. So for $399 I get software I can install on one pc, or I could subscribe to 365, spread that cost out over 4 years (by then a new version is out) , I can install it on 5 pc's , I get 20GB extra on my Skydrive AND minutes with skype. 365 sounds like a deal to me.

Enron said,
What are you talking about?
Many home users use Office for personal documents, and they don't need the power of Word, they can get by with Notepad or Wordpad, or Pages on a mac. Why would they spend $99 a year when you can get it once and be done with it for years. Sure it's a good deal if you use it, or are a business that always upgrades, but many small businesses can also get by with using a traditional license of Office for 10 years.

greenwizard88 said,
Why would they spend $99 a year when you can get it once and be done with it for years.

You're answering your own question:

Sure it's a good deal if you use it, or are a business that always upgrades

And the comparison of Word to Notepad is a joke. Comparing it to WordPad is slightly more valid, but it doesn't have spell check, tables, limited bullet point capabilities, limited object (including pictures) capabilities, no floating elements, no headers/footers. These are all basic features that most Word users use. Lead alone all the other tools that make up Office.

Sadelwo said,
Office Pro is $399, you get all the programs in Office 365 for $99 per year. So for $399 I get software I can install on one pc, or I could subscribe to 365, spread that cost out over 4 years (by then a new version is out) , I can install it on 5 pc's , I get 20GB extra on my Skydrive AND minutes with skype. 365 sounds like a deal to me.

No, you can install Office on your desktop AND your laptop; the only requirement is not to use the two copies at the same time. If Office 2013 stand alone edition will kill the two installations the price has increased by more than 200%.

Fritzly said,

No, you can install Office on your desktop AND your laptop; the only requirement is not to use the two copies at the same time. If Office 2013 stand alone edition will kill the two installations the price has increased by more than 200%.

It has been spelled out on several other blogs, you can only install on ONE device. If you want to use your laptop and desktop then you need to buy two copies. They used to have bundles whereby you could get a second license at a discount but that has been discontinued. You've never been allowed to install a single license on two machines (except home & student, which allowed 3).

mog0 said,

It has been spelled out on several other blogs, you can only install on ONE device. If you want to use your laptop and desktop then you need to buy two copies. They used to have bundles whereby you could get a second license at a discount but that has been discontinued. You've never been allowed to install a single license on two machines (except home & student, which allowed 3).

I am sorry but you are dead wrong; without going very far:

http://www.neowin.net/news/did...ice-is-licensed-for-two-pcs

Not that I had any doubt: I bought Office and read the TOS, something that these so called "bloggers" should do before pontificating....

mog0 said,

It has been spelled out on several other blogs, you can only install on ONE device. If you want to use your laptop and desktop then you need to buy two copies. They used to have bundles whereby you could get a second license at a discount but that has been discontinued. You've never been allowed to install a single license on two machines (except home & student, which allowed 3).


Nope, the licence agreement is pretty clear that Office can be installed on a licensed device and one additional portable device:
http://office.microsoft.com/en...ffice-2010-HA101817777.aspx

edit: well and truly beaten by Fritzly, I should have refreshed the page

greenwizard88 said,
Many home users use Office for personal documents, and they don't need the power of Word, they can get by with Notepad or Wordpad, or Pages on a mac. Why would they spend $99 a year when you can get it once and be done with it for years. Sure it's a good deal if you use it, or are a business that always upgrades, but many small businesses can also get by with using a traditional license of Office for 10 years.

Depends on what they do at home. By that logic, Word (WordPerfect, for that matter) is overkill for most businesses, let alone governments.
Let's face facts - Word (and WordPerfect; I came to Word *from* WordPerfect, and prior to that, MultiMate Advantage and WordStar) is the word-processing equivalent of a ginsu knife; the same applies to Excel (and Lotus 1-2-3) and spreadsheets; however, has there, or has there not, been continued demand (from users) for additional features, despite over three-fourths of the user base not using half of what's there?

Obry said,

It will work out very well from what I see. Obviously this is not geared for people who think it's a glorified notepad. For the millions of other business professionals, this sounds great. I am getting the Small Business subscription as soon as it is available. I am currently using the preview and I'm extremely happy with it.


Businesses can afford the Business versions easily.

PGHammer said,

Let's face facts - Word (and WordPerfect; I came to Word *from* WordPerfect, and prior to that, MultiMate Advantage and WordStar) is the word-processing equivalent of a ginsu knife;

Wow! I remeber a time when Wordstar for DOS was the king of the jungle; every business used it. That and Quattro Pro, which I loved.....

x90DarkThunder said,
*sigh* I am going to miss Office Picture Manager, it is a shame that they killed it in favor of pushing their less capable cloud services.

Are you being sarcastic or are you serious about wanting them to keep some picture manager? And how exactly are their cloud services not capable? Have you even used any of it to make any kind of conclusions?

I was thinking I was going to do it -- but then I realized I'm going to buy two Surface RTs for my wife and I, so all that will be left is my office PC -- and I'll just use my MSDN copy of Office on that one.