Microsoft, Apple and Google help to launch new web standards

Microsoft, along with a ton of other tech and Internet companies, have worked together to form a series of standards for websites under the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Today, many of those companies have joined forces to launch a new website that will serve as a center of information about those standards.

The site is called WebPlatform.org and besides Microsoft the list of companies include the usual suspects: Apple, Google, Mozilla, Facebook, Opera, HP, Nokia and Adobe. In a post on its official blog, the site's organizers state that web designers and programmers have had to go to a number of different sources in order to keep up with the latest information about web programming standards. The blog states this new site is supposed to change all that. It says in part:

WebPlatform.org will have accurate, up-to-date, comprehensive references and tutorials for every part of client-side development and design, with quirks and bugs revealed and explained. It will have in-depth indicators of browser support and interoperability, with links to tests for specific features. It will feature discussions and script libraries for cutting-edge features at various states of implementation or standardization, with the opportunity to give feedback into the process before the features are locked down. It will have features to let you experiment with and share code snippets, examples, and solutions. It will have an API to access the structured information for easy reuse. It will have resources for teachers to help them train their students with critical skills. It will have information you just can’t get anywhere else, and it will have it all in one place.

The blog adds that WebPlatform.org is still in development and that it will be asking members of the web development community to help with expanding the site and improving its features.

Microsoft has been a major contributor to web programming standards. Recently, the company submitted a proposal for a new website standard, Pointer Events, to the W3C for its consideration.

Source: WebPlatform.org | Image via W3C

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

ZTE caught selling equipment to Iran, Congress wants sales ban

Next Story

World of Warcraft hackers kill lots of in-game characters

27 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

It's about a time to force development of new web standards. It will take ages for lazy w3 to approve html5, css3 and css4... HTML6 should have been here already...

Frankenchrist said,
So... will that mean we don't have to use html hacks specifically for IE to display html 5? I'll believe that when (read: if) I see it.

Did you read the article? Was it about the development of Internet Explorer?

Lamp Post said,

Did you read the article? Was it about the development of Internet Explorer?

Yes. It also included cake recipes and the 2013 horoscope.

pantera9 said,
Why not just team up with http://w3schools.com/ ?
The WebPlatform.org design/layout is a bit noisy and unstructured. I get a better overview at w3schools. We'll see how it turns out.....

I find the layout much more well-structured than W3Schools. To find stuff at W3Schools I often have to Google it.

Very interesting and informative site. A great place especially if you're just getting started learning HTML principles and coding.

what they need is a set of tests they can all agree on as representative of HTML5 support and not those that pop up all the time to make IE look bad by ignoring the flaws of chrome and FF and exalt the flaws of IE spec wise.

in this way we can finally have a definitive guide to HTML5 support instead of a bunch of sites with their own agenda. *cough* html5test *cough*

When all of them start working well with the old standards I'll be happy about the new standards they are working towards.

A340600 said,
I think this is the first time I see Microsoft's new logo on a site outside of Microsoft.

...I hope you are joking.

pes2013 said,

...I hope you are joking.

Nope. I should have also said "outside of Neowin" but yeah, that might be the first time I see or notice the new logo. I'm not counting the news about the new logo either.

francescob said,
Think different! It's most likely because you have to pay to see it.

It might actually be the case. they might have requested money for using their logo or typical apple they don't feel their logo be used side by side other logos at the bottom.

Problems I experienced with HTML5 is that some things work in IE others in Chrome and others in FireFox. Although the above companies agree on the standards at the high level, they fail to standardise APIs

Or maybe it's because HTML5 and CSS3 are not final and they don't want to implement a syntax that may change breaking all previous websites?

If there's anything to be said for having plugins like Flash and Silverlight - at least they have standardised and consistent behaviours between browsers.

~Johnny said,
If there's anything to be said for having plugins like Flash and Silverlight - at least they have standardised and consistent behaviours between browsers.

No, they didn't, firefox for example treated text input differently, there was a famous azerty bug.

Not to mention the trillion different flash versions out there.

XerXis said,

No, they didn't, firefox for example treated text input differently, there was a famous azerty bug.

Not to mention the trillion different flash versions out there.

Obviously when you're using the same version - and that's one tiny bug thanks to Firefox, compared to... the truck loads of differences with how browsers handle DOM, HTML, JS, etc.