Microsoft back to bundling IE with Windows after anti-trust terms expire

It's been a long time since Microsoft was able to have its way with their Internet browser. The anti-trust case that the company lost over 10 years ago effectively loosened the link between IE and Windows so that competing browsers could stand a chance against the juggernaut. Over a decade and a couple of major releases later, Microsoft is planning to begin tightening integration right where they left off.

According to CRN, the version of Internet Explorer bundled with Windows 8 will be a permanent fixture. In previous releases, Microsoft was forced to allow uninstalling the software, and even published instructions on how to do so. While Windows 8 does have an option to "turn IE off", that just removes it from view. If you turn the "feature" back on, all of your customized settings still exist, pointing to the likelihood that IE is never really uninstalled completely. While this alone isn't a smoking gun, the fact that Metro apps will rely on the existence of IE 10 pretty much seals the deal. When asked about the ability to uninstall, a Microsoft spokeswoman referred to earlier press documents on IE 10, none of which detail any process for uninstallation.

Since the terms of the consent agreement actually expired earlier this year, Microsoft isn't in the (legal) wrong for bundling IE. In fact, the marketplace is so different than than it was 10 years ago that one has to ask if it really makes a difference anymore if IE is bundled. When the anti-trust case was being fought, the only real competitor was Netscape. Needless to say, Netscape is no longer a threat, Firefox and Chrome have eaten very far into IE's once dominant market share, and browsers are becoming less of a standalone software and more of an integrated OS component (see: Google Chrome OS). Microsoft may be back to its nefarious bundling ways, but its effect on the market will not be nearly as disruptive as it once was.

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i think microsoft should make IE a true competitor with more of the industry features that users actually want like a more flexible browser, including integrated add-ons (not accelerators, separate programs (extensions), so on) and also include a better list of options and better syncing support

i stll think that was a stupid move , and stupid law, dam europian laws.....what i want is everything ot of the ox, i dont like firefox, IE works just fine for me, if i want firefox i can use it.

why such things oly happens to companies who are famous or working well, why not such issues cameup for IOS and its builtin browser? why not make them remove their browser for firefox or opera....

Retaining all settings and user data unless specifically told to delete it is the correct and expected behaviour when uninstalling any program, Microsoft or otherwise.

More importantly this behaviour is not a new change for Windows 8 nor IE10; it can be recreated on Windows 7 or earlier with IE9 or earlier. The source article makes baseless, biased claims based on the author's complete lack of understanding of the subject matter.

I am also a bit disappointed to see a Neowin author basing a news post on this unfortunately misleading article without investigating whether its claims are actually true.

It was never about Microsoft's dominance in the browser market. Europe just wanted to boost their economy by fining Microsoft. By the looks of it, they have failed.

why does it even need to be uninstalled in the first place? are people that starved for disk space?
I have been running Chrome or Firefox for a few years now as my default, never thought once about uninstalling IE, no need. Its also a good back up to have

I really hope IE10 is gonna look damn sexy and clean with the Metro UI, and that is support everything with HTML5 and all that new... web standard stuff.. , I'll sure drop Chrome for IE10 then!

Dermot said,

IE 4.0?, Please Go away.


I meant this is gonaa happen again, LIKE IT DID on IE 4, not that what it's gonaa happen on will be IE 4 again...

One can't understand an operating system without a browser right now, regardless of the platform. Although everybody can see how microsoft took advantage to wipe netscape off the map (and how bad IE6 was for the internet)...
Anyway, even if they were forced to, has microsoft EVER offered a version of windows without internet explorer? i know you can uninstall it, but the european N versions only affected windows media player, not IE.

There's also the argument that, while integrating is overkill, the inclusion of a browser is expected now for any OS. I mean, I just got a Mac, and without Safari, how would I conveniently get Chrome?

OSX comes with Safari, want it or not. Windows comes with IE. Every Linux comes with something. Smartphones all comes with pre-installed browsers. You can't offer an OS as a consumer platform without a browser, period, even if the only point of that browser is to download an alternative.

You can delete Safari and I'm guessing that you can delete the Linux equivalents, you can't delete IE you can only hide/disable it. While it might be only a small difference to some it 's a bigger deal to others (especially in the days when MS was using it as a means to gain browser market share and pushing for Windows/IE only features like ActiveX).

Can't say i've had much use for any other browser other than portable firefox/chrome to download patches cuz stupid users still running IE6 in 2011!!!!

I on the other has never been infected or affected by any of those "IE threats" so it's all good here.

Lame article:

"While Windows 8 does have an option to "turn IE off", that just removes it from view. If you turn the "feature" back on, all of your customized settings still exist, pointing to the likelihood that IE is never really uninstalled completely."

This is exactly the same as the current windows 7 behaviour

bobbba said,
Lame article:

"While Windows 8 does have an option to "turn IE off", that just removes it from view. If you turn the "feature" back on, all of your customized settings still exist, pointing to the likelihood that IE is never really uninstalled completely."

This is exactly the same as the current windows 7 behaviour

There is a difference from keeping settings and uninstalling the product. Other programs tend to keep their registry settings but uninstall their program files.

If they're going to bundle it, they're going to have to enforce updating the browser and its components. Otherwise if Win7 were to become THE OS for several years we would eventually end up in the same situation as we are now with IE6 and 7 - an obsolete browser used by lots of businesses.

We would of had web apps a longtime ago if Microsoft didn't have to stop with IE. But those web apps would only work on windows as Microsoft was making a lot of windows specific changes to html but its ok, web standards are better.

Never bothered me, but I can see how other browser developers dont like the monopoly effect MS once had with IE.

Personally Id rather just leave it on my system both as a backup browser and other back-end reliances.

Anyone who really wants to remove it or use a diff browser will do so. All that this effects is the grey area amongst ignorant users, half of whom are probably better of using IE as they,ll be able to seek support easily via MS.

It really doesn't matter much. Microsoft took advantage of bundling the core components of IE in their Windows operating system at the most opportune time. Back when people were getting their panties in a twist about it, Microsoft's tactics gave IE the edge by:
1. Including it by default in Windows
2. Preloading IE components at boot-up which resulted in IE opening up much much faster for the end user than any competing browser with a similar feature set could ever dream of.

The 2nd point was a huge advantage for Microsoft, but it was only at that time. Ultimately, it isn't what did Netscape in. Netscape Communicator just plain sucked and everyone who used it knew it.

Anyway, these days MS can do whatever they want with their web browser and it would hardly make any difference in the grand scheme of things.

Udedenkz said,

Except in EU

Even in the EU IE was included. IE has been hard coded into Windows for many years now (the only option available if you didn't want IE was to disable/hide it, not remove it).

bobbba said,

Even in the EU IE was included. IE has been hard coded into Windows for many years now (the only option available if you didn't want IE was to disable/hide it, not remove it).

Correct. IE is still installed by default on every machine in the EU. That's why the ballot box hasn't helped the situation one iota.

Joey S said,

Correct. IE is still installed by default on every machine in the EU. That's why the ballot box hasn't helped the situation one iota.

dude u are such an idiot just STFU!!

Joey S said,

Correct. IE is still installed by default on every machine in the EU. That's why the ballot box hasn't helped the situation one iota.

Trolling much?

Did they ever stop "bundling" Internet Explorer with a basic install? Anyone with half a brain new it was silly to try and remove it (which i never fully understood) as parts where embedded and very necessary...

Nothing has changed from Windows 7, why are people complaining. You can hide all entry points to IExplore.exe. I see nothing wrong with always bundling the IE rendering engine with the OS. Apps depend on it. I certainly wouldn't want an OS that can't render HTML properly.

I never understood the argument in the first place. Browser capabilities are basically a necessity for an OS these days. Just because linux and lovers of free software like their model of having to install their preferred browser, others don't care as long as compatibility and performance are decent.

Personally, because I am a developer, I have IE 9, Firefox 7, Safari 5 and Opera 10.xx installed so I can test on all browsers. And also, I've found that there are still some sites that just won't work well with IE 9 so I switch to Chrome or FF when I need to.

Wow it's such bs that Microsoft is allowed to bundle their own browser with their own operating system to create an easier to use operating system right from the start, even though no one is forced to use it!!

/s

thatguyandrew1992 said,
Wow it's such bs that Microsoft is allowed to bundle their own browser with their own operating system to create an easier to use operating system right from the start, even though no one is forced to use it!!
/s

Except that Microsoft never stopped bundling its browser with its OS. Even in the EU, Microsoft still installs IE on every machine regardless of the ballot box. So they got their own way anyway. And now with the antitrust monitoring gone, they're free to overtly kill the competition (browser, search) by leveraging their desktop monopoly.

SirEvan said,
so does apple get sued for including safari with their OS?

It's not the including part that was the problem. It's the fact that you couldn't uninstall it. You can uninstall Safari from OSX.

SirEvan said,
so does apple get sued for including safari with their OS?

Microsoft has a history of monopoly abuse and anti-competitive behaviour. Apple has neither a monopoly in the desktop OS market, nor has it abused its position so far.

It's like comparing apples (excuse the pun) and oranges.

UndergroundWire said,
It doesn't matter. Internet Explorer is the best download utility for Firefox or Chrome.

Yeah. I remember that. When I installed Windows 7 on my new PC I fired up IE to download Firefox.
Never got to installing it...

UndergroundWire said,
It doesn't matter. Internet Explorer is the best download utility for Firefox or Chrome.

Problem is, with IE9 you'd download a worse browser :\

Coi said,

Problem is, with IE9 you'd download a worse browser :\

True. IE9 has adblock too... Chrome quality, but still adblock.

Udedenkz said,

True. IE9 has adblock too... Chrome quality, but still adblock.

Which means its adblocking sucks. Only Firefox provides a decent adblock plus extension.

Coi said,

Problem is, with IE9 you'd download a worse browser :\

Wait, you're saying IE9 is better than all the other browsers. haha. You're a good comedian

Joey S said,

Which means its adblocking sucks. Only Firefox provides a decent adblock plus extension.

Yet IE9 is a lot faster and more responsive than Firefox.

Udedenkz said,

Yet IE9 is a lot faster and more responsive than Firefox.

All those adverts and flash animations require extra load time and reduce performance, so I respectfully disagree.

Joey S said,

All those adverts and flash animations require extra load time and reduce performance, so I respectfully disagree.

It is still faster and you can block most of them from loading

Another example of a monopoly at work. If responsible, fine. However, with Microsoft's history, I doubt they will act responsibility--thus, only a matter time before government gets involved again.

IE10 is not IE<10. at least it's standards-embracing and forward-looking. there will be far fewer complaints about a standards-compliant browser being tightly coupled. nothing wrong with that.

Why so "Bittching around"? If you don't like the browser, then don't use it. Turning it off/on won't impact the performance of your computer anyways...

The new development options for .Net framework on Windows 8 include the ability to develop using HTML5 and JavaScript these would need to be rendered via some kind of web user agent and it would be pointless to develop a seperate incarnation for the metro start screen.

Also allowing the render engine to be replace by some third party (for this portion of it) would be dangerous and undo part of the managed code environment that the .Net framework stands for.

This wouldn't remove a user's choice and having IE installed (silently) should cause no detriment (as the first poster as already stated it is more of an anoyance for the "I hate IE" crowd), I personally consider it more of an intrusion that other browsers are installed when I miss a checkbox whilst installing other third party apps.

Despite not enjoying many Microsoft products or strategies much, I approve of this. Because I think this anti-trust case has long since been made obsolete by recent developments in browsers and vertical marketing.

Microsoft is no monopoly. They aren't even a monopoly if we'd limit oureselves to companies using bundles and Microsoft would. Just look at Chromebooks. Heck, it's even in the name! It's as if Microsoft would sell IEBooks. So Apple is bundling, Google is bundling, and if Mozilla sold computers, you can be sure they'd bundle too. Couple this with the fact that IE market share is barely even over 50% anymore, the monopoly argument is busted, and MS should be free to do whatever they want with IE.

If people dislike PC's with IE bundled, feel free to use other operating system. We aren't living in the 1990's anymore where we're desperately tied to a particular OS just to be able to play games or use some graphics or office suite, or whatever.

Hurray for monopolies! At least the browserchoice.eu popup is still a requirement. It's not so bad nowadays bundling the browser because in general, people are more aware of the choices they have, as opposed to just "using the one that comes with it". Bundling won't have nearly the same effect that it did a decade ago against netscape. I just hope they don't revert back to just launching IE in MS products when clicking a hyperlink, instead of using the user's default browser.

Majesticmerc said,
Hurray for monopolies! At least the browserchoice.eu popup is still a requirement. It's not so bad nowadays bundling the browser because in general, people are more aware of the choices they have, as opposed to just "using the one that comes with it". Bundling won't have nearly the same effect that it did a decade ago against netscape. I just hope they don't revert back to just launching IE in MS products when clicking a hyperlink, instead of using the user's default browser.

I agree, I don't see a problem with the bundling. As long as applications they (and others develop) respect the user's default browser choice. Unfortunately, this is something that is still not done today. For instance, I have an application that will only launch the Opera browser if it is installed. The stupid thing is - I uninstalled Opera, now the links in that application don't work. It's dumb developers like that that cause problems.

Panda X said,
I don't see an up side to this.

Imagine Neowin without the bundled comment system. Want that?
I don't want an OS without an integrated HTML rendering engine.

RealFduch said,

Imagine Neowin without the bundled comment system. Want that?
I don't want an OS without an integrated HTML rendering engine.

They could add it in. What in Windows needs to be rendered in HTML and couldn't be done with any other browser?

farmeunit said,

They could add it in. What in Windows needs to be rendered in HTML and couldn't be done with any other browser?


Metro apps. One category of new Metro apps are those written in HTML5 and JavaScript. That's what this is actually about.

RealFduch said,

Imagine Neowin without the bundled comment system. Want that?
I don't want an OS without an integrated HTML rendering engine.

I was talking about the ability to remove IE post install. Removing the option to uninstall doesn't really serve any purpose and I don't see what good will come from removing an option.

Trident is one thing, it doesn't bother me. But just removing IE itself, Microsoft doesn't really gain removing the option.

farmeunit said,

They could add it in. What in Windows needs to be rendered in HTML and couldn't be done with any other browser?


Help files (.chm),…

farmeunit said,
They could add it in. What in Windows needs to be rendered in HTML and couldn't be done with any other browser?

The Metro start experience.
The Control Panel
Every widget/applet in the control panel
Office vNext
Windows Live products
Zune
Windows Media player
Windows Media Center
Windows Explorer (when certain options enabled)

FWIW, mshtml.dll is not IE, and vice versa. Microsoft could quite easily keep IE out of Windows and still have an HTML rendering library for showing their various HTML-oriented applications, but they aren't being watched anymore, so they can go back to "how things used to be".

Windows 8 is no different to Windows 7 in terms of how it handles default browsers. The difference here is that the Metro experience is standardized to IE10. CRN also have to remember that Windows 8 is alpha right now and things can change.

Tom W said,
Windows 8 is no different to Windows 7 in terms of how it handles default browsers. The difference here is that the Metro experience is standardized to IE10. CRN also have to remember that Windows 8 is alpha right now and things can change.

So basically Microsoft has integrated IE into the default metro UI so you'll be using it without even knowing what browser you're using. Sounds like Netscape part deux to me.

Microsoft is once again abusing its dominant position to kill all web browser and search engine competition. Why am I not surprised.

Joey S said,

So basically Microsoft has integrated IE into the default metro UI so you'll be using it without even knowing what browser you're using. Sounds like Netscape part deux to me.


Stop being silly, you know exactly what browser your using in the metro start screen, the damn tile says Internet Explorer! Shock! Nothing stops other browser makers from doing a start screen version of FF, or opera, or chrome.
Microsoft is once again abusing its dominant position to kill all web browser and search engine competition. Why am I not surprised.

Joey S said,

So basically Microsoft has integrated IE into the default metro UI so you'll be using it without even knowing what browser you're using. Sounds like Netscape part deux to me.

Microsoft is once again abusing its dominant position to kill all web browser and search engine competition. Why am I not surprised.

apple bundles safari with mac. how is this any different? of course the software maker is going to bundle their software together with their OS. don't be an idiot

Tom W said,
CRN also have to remember that Windows 8 is alpha right now and things can change.
Absolutely. Their evidence of it still existing is that their preferences were unchanged. Is it really that shocking that an alpha product's uninstall/remove feature may accidentally leave a configuration file, or that the configuration file that is likely not even a megabyte may be left so that you do not have to go through the hassles of reconfiguring everything if you ever did bring it back?

This is definitely a non-story.

Tomer2000 said,

Troll much?

No I just hate Windows 8. It would look great on a tablet or smart phone. Do you flame much?

Chsoriano said,

Lol... and so it begins. Hardly a reason to stop updating your computer's OS.

Not the reason, I just do not like Win 8.

Grinder said,

No I just hate Windows 8. It would look great on a tablet or smart phone. Do you flame much?


Don't deny it. You're an obvious troll. It doesn't matter whether you like Windows 8 or not. You have stated that you won't install it because of a essential HTML engine and now you're trying to back away.

Grinder said,

It would look great on a tablet or smart phone. Do you flame much?

I agree, but what has that to do with this article and/or the desktop UI?

Grinder said,

Not the reason, I just do not like Win 8.

Windows 8 isn't even finished yet and you know you don't like it?

I know I'm not a fan of the new start screen, and chances are if that isn't an option to remove I'd prefer not to upgrade to Windows 8 either, but the extra features will be there that make it a worth while upgrade... worth the expense cost of the upgrade? maybe, time will only tell.

Grinder said,

No I just hate Windows 8. It would look great on a tablet or smart phone. Do you flame much?

You said "Then I am staying with Windows". Your statement means (because of the article) you are staying with Windows 7 because Microsoft is bundling IE 10 with Windows 8. Then you say "No I just hate Windows 8". Yes you were trolling...

Grinder said,

No I just hate Windows 8. It would look great on a tablet or smart phone. Do you flame much?


Seems like you are ignoring the fact that there are two interfaces - an improved on W7 interface with taskbar and all and a Metro Interface.

Tomer2000 said,

You said "Then I am staying with Windows". Your statement means (because of the article) you are staying with Windows 7 because Microsoft is bundling IE 10 with Windows 8. Then you say "No I just hate Windows 8". Yes you were trolling...

My original statement was not trolling. AS to why I do not like Windows 8 as it currently is, there is or was no way to toggle the Metro Apps on/off. I understand with the latest build there is. I had it on my PC and all of the rave about how fast it boots is hogwash. Oh an I have a fairly new PC and it booted in about the same time that Windows 7 does. Windows 7 actually came out of sleep faster. I understand that this was only a dev build and not even in Alpha stage. I would hope that by the time it goes Beta it will be a great deal better. I am on a fixed income now and have given MS enough money over the years. There is nothing in 8 that would compel me to upgrade.

Grinder said,
Then I am staying with Windows 7.

I'm with this one. In all honesty from what I've seen with Windows 8 so far I dislike the UI sure it works nice for Tablets and Phones (if you like the WP which I do not like it much) but on my desktop I'd rather have my Windows 7 UI. that and honestly dislike Metro a bit I understand things change and things need to move forward and all but unless they have a way in the final to goto the current UI in Win7 Windows 8 is a no for me.

Grinder said,

My original statement was not trolling. AS to why I do not like Windows 8 as it currently is, there is or was no way to toggle the Metro Apps on/off. I understand with the latest build there is. I had it on my PC and all of the rave about how fast it boots is hogwash. Oh an I have a fairly new PC and it booted in about the same time that Windows 7 does. Windows 7 actually came out of sleep faster. I understand that this was only a dev build and not even in Alpha stage. I would hope that by the time it goes Beta it will be a great deal better. I am on a fixed income now and have given MS enough money over the years. There is nothing in 8 that would compel me to upgrade.

You have yet to provide a reason as to why your original statement was not trolling. Claiming that despite being able to hide IE10 (out of sight, out of mind), you still will not upgrade to Windows 8 solely on that fact is trolling. Also, before you defend your case with explanation, you should have thought about how your comment would be interpreted prior to clicking the "Add Comment" button.

Oh Boys! What is it you all problem?? lol He's not even saying Windows/Microsoft is bad. He's saying he prefer Window 7 over Window 8 and NOT an apple or linux, he's in the same camp with you guys. lol

And, since when the opinion become "trolling"? Can't one say he/she doesn't like the fact that IE is integrated with Win8 now? Which is totally related to the TOPIC! And, who are you to say someone can comment on a topic or not?

acidic-e- said,

I'm with this one. In all honesty from what I've seen with Windows 8 so far I dislike the UI sure it works nice for Tablets and Phones (if you like the WP which I do not like it much) but on my desktop I'd rather have my Windows 7 UI. that and honestly dislike Metro a bit I understand things change and things need to move forward and all but unless they have a way in the final to goto the current UI in Win7 Windows 8 is a no for me.

You obviously haven't been paying attention. The x86 version will have both the Windows 8 UI that can be closed, allowing you to use an improved Windows 7 UI.

The new metro UI will only be default on tablet devices, not desktops. Even some tablets will sport both UI's while some likely won't.

They have already demo'd Windows 8 with both UI's on a Samsung tablet that can be setup to work just like a desktop PC. Haven't you seen that?

I don't if people just don't pay attention or if they are just lazy in the head or both.

Was IE ever really uninstalled completely? I'm pretty sure it wasn't because so many other features depend on the trident engine (HTML help for one).

SOOPRcow said,
Was IE ever really uninstalled completely? I'm pretty sure it wasn't because so many other features depend on the trident engine (HTML help for one).

IE and Trident are two different entities. IE was completely removed, Trident wasn't.

SOOPRcow said,
Was IE ever really uninstalled completely? I'm pretty sure it wasn't because so many other features depend on the trident engine (HTML help for one).

You're correct.
It never was, for example Windows Update needs it, too, to add another candidate of dependency.

You COULD hack it from your system, but you wouldn't do yourself a big favor there.
This was also an unsupported method.

Actually, IE hardly EVER uninstalled in Windows.
The engine, the core, always remained, unless you hacked big time.
This switch method is just the same just with strawberry flavor.

GS:mac

Panda X said,

IE and Trident are two different entities. IE was completely removed, Trident wasn't.


Trident is a core of IE, sure, at the same time of Windows, too.
But this is how far it streches, you can't even say IE uninstalls completely, as Windows has hooks to it's rendering core.

100% uninstall? Never did.

GS:mac

Glassed Silver said,

Trident is a core of IE, sure, at the same time of Windows, too.
But this is how far it streches, you can't even say IE uninstalls completely, as Windows has hooks to it's rendering core.

100% uninstall? Never did.

GS:mac

If you want to be 100% correct on this, Trident is the HTML layout engine. It is the MS equivalent of Webkit.

Trident is as much IE as Webkit is Chrome or Safari.

It matters not that it is shared, that is clever. If I coded something that could be used in more than one place why would I bother coding it repeatedly?

Insanemal said,

If you want to be 100% correct on this, Trident is the HTML layout engine. It is the MS equivalent of Webkit.

Trident is as much IE as Webkit is Chrome or Safari.

It matters not that it is shared, that is clever. If I coded something that could be used in more than one place why would I bother coding it repeatedly?

Of cause it is clever, then again there is no DIRE need to use HTML based content in the other places where it is used so heavily, of cause it's intelligent and the best way of handling it apparently to MS's considerations and I'm not here to doubt that.

You're correct on adding that it's the HTML part, however I see the HTML rendering to be one of the cores that FIRST and FOREMOST needs implementation in the browser, hence Windows' use is rather a derivate of IE technology than the other way around.

Yes, it's similar to frameworks and importance in OS wide integration has boosted over the past decade by much, still, Trident is seen as a IE core that Windows got some shares in rather than the other way around, simply by how they got melted together.

GS:mac

Glassed Silver said,

Of cause it is clever, then again there is no DIRE need to use HTML based content in the other places where it is used so heavily, of cause it's intelligent and the best way of handling it apparently to MS's considerations and I'm not here to doubt that.

You're correct on adding that it's the HTML part, however I see the HTML rendering to be one of the cores that FIRST and FOREMOST needs implementation in the browser, hence Windows' use is rather a derivate of IE technology than the other way around.

Yes, it's similar to frameworks and importance in OS wide integration has boosted over the past decade by much, still, Trident is seen as a IE core that Windows got some shares in rather than the other way around, simply by how they got melted together.

GS:mac

But all the content in a modern GUI is basically "HTML" like in nature.
Again why reinvent the wheel when you can describe the contents of pretty much anything as a dynamically generated HTML document.

Also IE 4 was the first IE to use this new engine. It was part of the new OS (Win98) and was also part of a major overhaul patch to Win95. I would actually suggest that the Explorer and Internet explorer teams talked about overlapping functionality and designed it to achieve both goals. However it has not been used for explorer since Win 2000. It was used in some control panels in XP, But not the bulk of the Explorer as per earlier versions of windows.

I really wish you would check your facts before making baseless claims.

Removing it, hiding the links, does it even matter? The actual engine has always been tightly integrated in Windows, removing it would only cause problems. Only stupid fanboys would want to completely remove IE. Removing it will only cause problems anyway.

Ambroos said,
Removing it, hiding the links, does it even matter? The actual engine has always been tightly integrated in Windows, removing it would only cause problems. Only stupid fanboys would want to completely remove IE. Removing it will only cause problems anyway.

True, after all how else are they going to download their browser of choice?

Ambroos said,
Removing it, hiding the links, does it even matter? The actual engine has always been tightly integrated in Windows, removing it would only cause problems. Only stupid fanboys would want to completely remove IE. Removing it will only cause problems anyway.
Fanboys would want to remove IE... ? ... Wouldnt they be the ones who would want to keep it around...

este said,
Fanboys would want to remove IE... ? ... Wouldnt they be the ones who would want to keep it around...
Ithink he meant Opera fanoboys, FireFox fanboys and so on...

sagum said,
True, after all how else are they going to download their browser of choice?

Win+R->cmd<enter>ftp ftp.firefox.com<enter>cd /yadda/yadda/yadda<enter>lcd c:\temp\<enter>bin<enter>get stableRelease.exe<enter>

dotf said,

Win+R->cmd<enter>ftp ftp.firefox.com<enter>cd /yadda/yadda/yadda<enter>lcd c:\temp\<enter>bin<enter>get stableRelease.exe<enter>

And the average user can remember how to do this...