Microsoft begins beta testing of "Windows Advisor."

Microsoft has begun privately beta testing a new tool, known as "Windows Advisor," which is aimed at helping consumers better pinpoint why their Windows machines might not be up to snuff. Windows Advisor currently supports Windows XP Service Pack 2 and Windows Vista. The beta version is available in English only.

Microsoft officials have been saying that Windows, and especially the much-maligned Windows Vista, isn't to blame for all of users' PC problems. Faulty drivers and badly written apps are often behind users' unhappiness with their new PCs, the Softies have said. Microsoft is making sure that users will be able to place blame where it belongs with Windows Advisor.

Link: ZDNet Blogs

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When designing hardware or software, you want your system to fail gracefully. The software should never be in an unknown state. If the application or the OS can't ensure a safe state, it must do *something* to ensure that user data is not compromised.

At worst, the application/OS will terminate (BSOD) thereby preventing further damage to the user data. The worst thing the application/OS can do is claiming everything is "alright" when it's in fact corrupting things.

http://www.geekstogo.com/forum/Windows-XP-...des-t43519.html

Memory errors are never "simple."

My two cent's worth - Blue Screens of Death are a disastrous way to handel what is usually just a minor infringment of such things as memory allocation.

So a simple error such as a program trying to reference invalid memory takes out the whole OS - crashing down into oblivion with any open apps and files going south with it - Yeah a great response to what could behandled much more safely.

I have had a few instances wher I have had some app try to write to invalid memory say - now I know the OS should intercept that and freeze it but can't they simply inform you - force an orderly shutdown of open apps and files and then force a shutdown.

Apparently not - for a simple memory error - a harmless incident if handled more elegantly - the OS crashes down then upon reboot scrambles your hard disk because checkdisk is more often than not set to run because of the file system errors generated by the Blue Screen.

As I said earlier I have something as inocuous as a memory allocation error force a Blue Screen, crash the OS and totally scramble the system partition on restart so that the only sensible solution was a re-install.

In fact - lets be honest - Windows almost demands a clean install every few months to keep running error free - no matter who is at fault.

Microsoft ARE responsible for the Blue Screens - it may not always be their code that cause them BUT it is their code which does such a bad job of handling it.

Really? What the hell are you guys doing to you computers? The last XP install lasted me 2 years.. and the only reason I wiped it out... was because I got a new MB, RAM , video card and CPU. One of my best friends has to reinstall Windows every few months, I always ask, "Jeff, why do you have to reinstall XP again?" His answer, "It just crashes." Faulty hardware, bad drivers and user errors can take their toll on Windows.

This is actually a decent tool, been testing it for a while. While most of the stuff "fixed" is just basic knowledge for geeks, it is likely to help solve a lot of "stupid" problems people have with their pc. (no I didnt call the people stupid, just the problems

There are plenty of problems Windows has that are unobvious or that return cryptic error messages... hopefully this tool will be able to help figure them out? Sometimes I've wondered why a Windows machine was just slowing down for no apparent reason or why it would slowly start choking on itself even though no new software was installed.

Most blue screens are caused by bad drivers. If people would just run microsofts dump file utility they would see the program that caused it.

Vista isn't a complete package, but it's not a horrible OS, either, damnit. It's not the fault of a single person or company, it's the fact that behind every application is a multi-million dollar corporation determined at making an extra buck. And, if testing the application thoroughly is going to cost them $$$, then they'll just do some simple tests that cost $, instead.

Microsoft is at fault,
Add-On companies are at fault,
laa laa laa.

Edit: And, god forbid, sometimes, it's you, the end user, who doesn't know what the f*ck to do.

i like how they try to shift the blame elsewhere while they try to clean up there own ****ups
not very mature at all microsoft

It's sad to see so many people point the finger at Microsoft when their computer doesn't run perfectly. 9 times out of 10 it's user error and the rest of the time it's a hardware failure or a bug in the OS or an application.

Blue screens of death are actually a good thing. The data is spits out will help you troubleshoot a failure. But people are too ignorant to understand that so they blame Microsoft because there's just NO WAY the problem could be between the chair and the keyboard

I'll agree to this. Only time XP has done a BSOD on me was from something wonderfully stupid I did. I really don't want to announce what I did either, but if you really want to know, PM me. :S

I actually received one last week... first time I've had one in a long while (XP SP3). I like how it automatically resets the computer for you now; however, it reset too quickly! I couldn't read the BSOD message.

And if it works right people will finally start getting a clue that their PC isn't just about Windows alone. It's easy to blame one thing for every problem even if that's really not the case.

(GP007 said @ #2.1)
And if it works right people will finally start getting a clue that their PC isn't just about Windows alone. It's easy to blame one thing for every problem even if that's really not the case.

Windows is the problem because the design of Windows is what has created many of these problems. Windows is unstable and fragile. One single corrupt or missing entry in the registry and it all comes crashing down. Windows is too $*(^(!*^$ stupid to reset its services and reconfigure the hardware when that happens. One bad driver and it won't boot because it's too @)$^(!)*^$ stupid to ignore it and load in safe mode. You've got restore points, but how about the restore point problems in Vista because MS once again made yet another idiotic design decision--in a poor imitation of Apple's Time Machine--and integrated Shadow Copy with it? Why !($*^!^$*#! is this now mandatory in Vista?

It really is Microsoft's fault. Other operating systems don't experience the same problems in quite the same way. They are more resilient to many of these errors that make Windows come crashing down, or not even boot. Much of it comes down to the Registry and the amount of bloat (and legacy support) that is in Windows.

Faulty drivers and badly written apps are often behind users’ unhappiness with their new PCs

Absolutely right. I can't count the amount of times people have moaned at me about Windows because <insert application name here> keeps crashing.

(El Sid said @ #1)

Absolutely right. I can't count the amount of times people have moaned at me about Windows because <insert application name here> keeps crashing.

explorer.exe?
iexplore.exe?

(_dandy_ said @ #1.1)

explorer.exe?
iexplore.exe?

And yet most of the time the crash is not from those two apps ether. The only crashes I have had with IE have been from bad Add-Ons or codecs with explorer

(bryonhowley said @ #1.4)

And yet most of the time the crash is not from those two apps ether. The only crashes I have had with IE have been from bad Add-Ons or codecs with explorer

Don't be so quick to be dismissive. I can still crash IE after a clean install + all updates, and while Explorer itself is more resilient to outrigth crashes, I can certainly get it to misbehave.