Microsoft: break up HTML 5

The ever-increasing intricacy of the World Wide Web is evidenced by the character and scope of the HTML 5 draft specification. Microsoft wants to hasten HTML 5's arrival, but its proposed solution may not sit well with all parties.

In a recent interview, Internet Explorer platform architect Chris Wilson told SD Times that more progress could be made with teams working in parallel, and he recommended that portions of the HTML 5 specification be broken off and assigned to new workgroups. That might not be as radical as it sounds, according to Forrester analyst Jeffrey Hammond, who believes that it makes sense to subdivide HTML 5 into smaller, more manageable pieces. "I can't even imagine how many years it will take browsers to implement it [HTML 5]." Hammond posited, "How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time."

Wilson explained that several pieces of HTML 5 would be equally useful outside of it, particularly for Web applications and content. Those bits include such features as the Canvas APIs, which are used to render moving graphics; offline caching of Web applications' resources; persistent client-side data storage; and the peer-to-peer (P2P) networking connection framework.

View: Full Article @ SD Times

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HTML5 isn't even finished yet, so why isn't MS worrying about the current recommendations (like XHTML 1.0, or even XHTML 1.1, and CSS 2.1, at the very least for now) before delving into drafts?

As for HTML5 already being here, no, it isn't. Silverlight doesn't work on Linux (though there is the Moonlight project headed by Mono developers), and people are getting tired of Flash (Flash makes the fans on my Windows notebook go into overdrive for some reason), meaning Flex isn't ideal either.

I like what the MS developers are doing with IE8 (as long as they don't backpedal on their decision to use IE8's super-compliance engine by default), but I hope they don't screw things up.

Yes, I agree it's a bit funny Microsoft of all companies are talking about this. They're just now with IE 8 starting to work hard for CSS 2.1 support.

(Jugalator said @ #5.1)
Yes, I agree it's a bit funny Microsoft of all companies are talking about this. They're just now with IE 8 starting to work hard for CSS 2.1 support.

Microsoft said in the IE8b1 Release Notes:
Effect of HTML 5.0 Spec Updates:

The Internet Explorer 8 AJAX features Cross Document Messaging and DOM Storage are based on the HTML 5.0 specification. The specification is in draft stage and is continually being updated. Therefore, our implementation of the specification may be based on an older version. The Internet Explorer team will look into updating the implementation when possible after Beta 1.


http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/949787

We have HTML5 already, just use Flex or Silverlight, they already support most of these features.

By the time this HTML5 spec will be standardized and implemented the web will be in Web 3.0 and it will be too little too late.

“I can’t even imagine how many years it will take browsers to implement it [HTML 5].” Hammond posited, “How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.”

Uh, yeah.. that's Microsoft ****ty way of implementing things alright. Hey, let's spend 5 years (or whatever the exact amount of time was) implementing CSS2. LMAO.

I think it'll add semi-standardised sets of features for browsers to implement, rather than them adding random features from all over the spec. Not that people won't implement the easiest to implement features, but still.

But will there be any practical differences compared to if they don't?

The WebKit team is planning to implement some "useful" parts of HTML 5, for example. And probably more to come in the future.

I think the web browser developers will incrementally start support HTML 5 regardless if this happens or not.