Microsoft CIO Tony Scott leaves company for personal projects


Microsoft CIO Tony Scott left the company last week to pursue "personal projects."

Tony Scott, Microsoft's chief information officer for the past five years, left his role with the Windows maker last week, according to the former executive's LinkedIn profile. A recent media report indicates Scott left the company to pursue "personal projects."

Scott's departure was first reported by GeekWire on Sunday afternoon. GeekWire reported that Microsoft "announced the news internally to staff late last week." Scott oversaw security, infrastructure, messaging and business applications at Microsoft prior to his departure; he served in the same role at Walt Disney before joining Microsoft.

Microsoft provided GeekWire with the following statement confirming Scott's departure:

Tony Scott decided to depart Microsoft to focus on personal projects. While at Microsoft, Tony was a strong IT leader passionate about taking Microsoft’s technology to the next level and using our experiences and learnings to help customers and partners. We thank Tony for his contributions and wish him well.

Jim Dubois, vice president of IT product and services management at Microsoft, will service as interim CIO until a replacement is named.

Scott's departure marks the third executive to leave Microsoft in the seven months. Steven Sinofsky, the previous head of Windows development, left Microsoft in November amid speculation that he was forced out of the role. Peter Klein, Microsoft's former chief financial officer, announced his planned departure from the company in April.

Julie Larson-Green has since taken over as head of Windows development, though Tami Reller, chief financial officer and chief marketing officer for Windows, has assumed more business responsibilities for Microsoft's flagship operating system. Amy Hood was named the company's new CFO last month.

Source: GeekWire via CNET | Image via Microsoft

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