Microsoft claims WP7 is 20% more efficient than other platforms

Microsoft is not shy about taking its gloves off when it comes to comparing its products to the competion. They recently released a video (and then pulled it) that talked about how OpenOffice was actually costing corporations money rather than saving it. 

Microsoft is claiming, based on internal research, that WP7 "requires up to 20% fewer steps to perform common tasks," according to Computerworld.com. These claims are to show that Microsoft's platform, despite being the new kid on the block, will actually save you time. This information aligns with the idea that WP7 was designed to be a "glance and go" OS rather than a "stop and stare" OS.

As Microsoft continues its advertising campaign, you can be certain that they will be pushing this idea that WP7 is the most efficient mobile OS on the market. With nearly $500 million dollars behind the advertising campaign, they will release a barrage of content that will plaster all the faces of modern media. 

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I just started seeing the commercials for the Windows phone on TV, so it looks like they are starting to put the advertising money you mentioned to use. I'm wondering how many users will decide to buy the first version of this phone. Do you think that this claim of being 20% more effective will motivate people?

What they are claiming is not easily verifiable. They're not claiming it to be 20% faster than the other platforms (which is something that I could believe, since it seems this OS was pretty much written up from the scratch with the iOS/android in mind).

So they're not talking about.. CPU efficiency, rendering times, etc. They're talking about "steps". Fewer taps on the screen? Fewer screens to review before going to the next step? Stuff like that. That's difficult to quantify, IMO, so i'll take this 20% with a grain of salt.

How do you assess whether an OS lets you do things "faster" than another one?

Julius Caro said,
So they're not talking about.. CPU efficiency, rendering times, etc. They're talking about "steps". Fewer taps on the screen? Fewer screens to review before going to the next step? Stuff like that. That's difficult to quantify, IMO, so i'll take this 20% with a grain of salt.
What are you talking about? Yes, that stuff is easy to quantify. It's probably the easiest stuff to quantify.

You say: how many steps does it take to call X contact on X phone. And count them. And see the difference.

There may indeed be differences in how it presents the information, or how quickly each step takes ... but they claimed "requires up to 20% fewer steps to perform common tasks"

Julius Caro said,
What they are claiming is not easily verifiable. They're not claiming it to be 20% faster than the other platforms (which is something that I could believe, since it seems this OS was pretty much written up from the scratch with the iOS/android in mind).

So they're not talking about.. CPU efficiency, rendering times, etc. They're talking about "steps". Fewer taps on the screen? Fewer screens to review before going to the next step? Stuff like that. That's difficult to quantify, IMO, so i'll take this 20% with a grain of salt.

I think that steps, or taps on the screen are what most users notice more than anyting else. With android, 90% of the users couldn't care less what the CPU is rated at, or how much it can be oc'd. They don't care about quadrant or linpack scores. They aren't going to notice a few millisecond difference in rendering. They notice how many steps it takes to get something done or to view updated information.

Is it more efficient when IE mobile fails to render a web page properly and you can't read it? Is it more efficient when you can't even copy and paste a piece of text? Is it more efficient when you can't view a web site properly because flash isn't supported on the platform? Is it more efficient when you can't even change a ringtone? Is it more efficient when third party apps can't run in the background? Is it more efficient when... You see where this is going lol.

Flawed said,
Is it more efficient when IE mobile fails to render a web page properly and you can't read it? Is it more efficient when you can't even copy and paste a piece of text? Is it more efficient when you can't view a web site properly because flash isn't supported on the platform? Is it more efficient when you can't even change a ringtone? Is it more efficient when third party apps can't run in the background? Is it more efficient when... You see where this is going lol.

Adobe has already stated that Flash will be supported by WP7, Android, and Blackberry, flash support is not Microsoft's problem unless they prevent it the way Jobs did.

Copy and Paste is something that other touch based platforms only brought to market a year ago and something they have already stated will be included in the near future.

As far as not being able to render web pages, if the browser is anything like the version of mobile IE on the ZuneHD, there shouldn't be any problem. Have you used the platform and discovered this yourself or are you assuming this is the case?

I think you are referring to not being able to add ringtones. Its pretty rediculous that not one of the testers wanted a different ringtone. That definitely shouldn't have been overlooked.

I have a vibrant and have have the MyTouch and G1 before that. One of the biggest problems I have with the Android platform is the inability to prevent applications (esp. anything installed in system/app) from starting up with the phone or from running in the background later. There is also no granular control over what permissions these apps get, just a read and accept prompt. Sometimes it is more efficient to prevent these things from happening or to give the user control over when it does happen. Usually when I exit from an app I'm done with it, though when I'm trying to do multiple things at once (cardio trainer + Pandora) I should be able to allow it to happen. Having to go into task manager to shut down apps I've exited seems redundant. Most users don't realize that some of the apps create services and that more are installed by the mftr or carrier into system/app and cannot be seen by the stock task manager.

I hope to god that Microsoft puts out a huge update before the new year for WP7. Currently there are some major bugs. Like not being able to adjust your phone volume using the volume rockers (it only changes the music volume) - WTF?
also:
*When adding a picture to a text message it is not possible to preview the picture.
*a2dp doesn't work.
*no way to send a meeting request to any arbitrary e-mail address - it can only be sent to people in your actual contact list.
*cant connect to wifi with hidden ssid.
and more


micro said,
Currently there are some major bugs. Like not being able to adjust your phone volume using the volume rockers (it only changes the music volume)

You can adjust the phone volume using the volume rockers, but only while you are in a call. Music volume ranges from 0 to 30, and phone volume ranges from 0 to 10. I'm not sure why they chose a different range...

I'm waiting to see whether 3rd party apps will develop Metro based apps. I'm afraid that they might not and it will make the OS look very inconsistent. I hope I'm wrong.

When I read the headline I thought it was referring to battery life. WP7 is much more efficient in terms of energy usage, too.

Tim Acheson said,
When I read the headline I thought it was referring to battery life. WP7 is much more efficient in terms of energy usage, too.

In the end with being able to get to and use apps/features quicker, it would also give you a little extra battery life. How noticable? I don't know. I'm in Canada, I don't have one of these phones yet. I'm want the Omnia 7 but we won't be getting it here, at least not in any plans that I know of yet. I'm waiting for a phone I'm gonna like. All the phones being released here are ugly. None of them appeal to me.

But yeah, I thought battery life too. This does help with battery life though so it's all cool.

Tim Acheson said,
When I read the headline I thought it was referring to battery life. WP7 is much more efficient in terms of energy usage, too.

Haven't noticed this myself though the battery in the HTC trophy is smaller than others

There are no doubts that driving a car requires more interaction than riding a bus but........ gives you also a much higher degree of flexibility in what you can do.

Fritzly said,
There are no doubts that driving a car requires more interaction than riding a bus but........ gives you also a much higher degree of flexibility in what you can do.

Driving a car gets you to where you need quicker than riding the bus would. WP7 (it's claimed) gets you to where you need quicker than the bus would. Your analogy reverses (though I got it).

WP7 is a car you drive off the lot, Android is a car you piece together in the shop yourself, wrench handy

burnblue said,

Driving a car gets you to where you need quicker than riding the bus would. WP7 (it's claimed) gets you to where you need quicker than the bus would. Your analogy reverses (though I got it).

WP7 is a car you drive off the lot, Android is a car you piece together in the shop yourself, wrench handy

WP7 is a car you drive off the lot, Android is a car you piece together in the shop yourself, then when you needed more it crashes itself, also some of the good pieces work only if you put extra time & effort tuning(rooting) your car, so you really can use your car as your like it.

I can vouch for this - received my Omnia 7 on Monday as it's a total delight to use.

Once the OS can properly multi-task I think I will be making a permanent switch over from Android.

pixelfuze said,
I can vouch for this - received my Omnia 7 on Monday as it's a total delight to use.

Once the OS can properly multi-task I think I will be making a permanent switch over from Android.

Agreed, I have the same phone (isn't the amoled screen beautiful?) - they announced that they were going to open up background tasks to 3rd party devs soon, the dev has to prove its needed and isnt a resource hog. I think that's why the FB app is slow to reopen (say if you get a call then go back).

Once this is allowed we'll see better social apps (ping chat etc, messenger working properly etc)

duddit2 said,
(isn't the amoled screen beautiful?)

The fuzzy fonts ruin it for me. Heck, Orange tiles on the homescreen are jagged around the edges, whereas Blue tiles look nearly perfectly straight edged. Bad AMOLED screen, with it's weird pixel layout

pixelfuze said,
I can vouch for this - received my Omnia 7 on Monday as it's a total delight to use.

Once the OS can properly multi-task I think I will be making a permanent switch over from Android.

Don't hubs multitask? I thought apps could implement some functionality into hubs that needed multitasking. For example a music app could extend the Zune hub with it's own service. Idk I thought that... Don't any apps on the marketplace do that?

pixelfuze said,
I can vouch for this - received my Omnia 7 on Monday as it's a total delight to use.

Once the OS can properly multi-task I think I will be making a permanent switch over from Android.

Don't hubs multitask? I thought apps could implement some functionality into hubs that needed multitasking. For example a music app could extend the Zune hub with it's own service. Idk I thought that... Don't any apps on the marketplace do that?

Electric Jolt said,

Don't hubs multitask? I thought apps could implement some functionality into hubs that needed multitasking. For example a music app could extend the Zune hub with it's own service. Idk I thought that... Don't any apps on the marketplace do that?

True, for example I can run my Last.fm app as a marquee through the Zune hub so that it keeps running whilst I do other things - but if I just start the Last.fm app up and then minimize, my music stops playing. Not ideal!

duddit2 said,

Agreed, I have the same phone (isn't the amoled screen beautiful?)

Stunning screen!

duddit2 said,

Agreed, I have the same phone (isn't the amoled screen beautiful?)

You make it sound like WP7 phones are the only devices to have such a screen.

jbrooksuk said,

You make it sound like WP7 phones are the only devices to have such a screen.

Seriously, you have problems, he said nothing about the exclusivity of the screen.

Or maybe I just got trolled.

Since there are so many different versions of the phone(like droid) can they really give a percentage? I just think it would be based on particular phones with certain buttons etc..

the OS does look easier and quicker though..

Zeck said,
Since there are so many different versions of the phone(like droid) can they really give a percentage? I just think it would be based on particular phones with certain buttons etc..

the OS does look easier and quicker though..

The thing about these new phones compared to Android is the UI. The UI for the most part is all the same, unlike Android.

Based on this, it is easier to find out the efficiency of the phone usage.

Zeck said,
Since there are so many different versions of the phone(like droid) can they really give a percentage? I just think it would be based on particular phones with certain buttons etc..

the OS does look easier and quicker though..

You obviously have not been following Windows Phone 7. Windows Phone 7 is like Windows... Different hardware, same software experience. The manufacturers and carriers can install applications and put tiles on the start screen, HOWEVER, the applications can be uninstalled and the tiles can be removed... Not only that, there are 4 tiles on the start screen at the top (phone and such) that CANNOT be moved. So the carriers can only replace the bottom 4 tiles at the most.

It's the best of both worlds!

Zeck said,
Since there are so many different versions of the phone(like droid) can they really give a percentage? I just think it would be based on particular phones with certain buttons etc..

the OS does look easier and quicker though..

Haven't you even paid attention to the phones? They all have the same 3 hardware buttons on the top. It has nothing to do with typing. It has to do with the most common tasks done with a phone. And even if the phone has a physical keyboard, you can still type onscreen if u want too.

Please google and look at all the Windows phones. Obvioulsy you have no idea.

TechieXP said,

Obvioulsy you have no idea.


.... XD. i was talking about the hardware.. not all of their phones have the same exact buttons and accessories. the keyboard is the most obvious example. Personally i can type much faster on a physical keyboard than a virtual one. So if i was using a WP7 without a keyboard vs an iphone they would be the same but a WP7 with the keyboard would be much more efficient. Not all of the windows phones are going to have the same exact features. that was one of the main points microsoft made when it was announced.

Mr aldo said,

Windows Phone 7 is like Windows... Different hardware, same software experience.

This is exactly my point. A dell laptop and an asus laptop aren't going to be the same. some will have shortcuts for certain things. (quick pads, quick launch buttons, shortcuts, volume controls, network controls etc.)

It is quite easy to do things, only thing you need to really glace at is when your typing unless your good.

20% less tasks, well it's quite easy to delete applications, rate them and to go back, search etc The buttons help a lot on the iphone the back button had to be on the app unless you go right back to the home screen so you never have to scroll around looking for a back button.

Gaffney said,
It is quite easy to do things, only thing you need to really glace at is when your typing unless your good.

20% less tasks, well it's quite easy to delete applications, rate them and to go back, search etc The buttons help a lot on the iphone the back button had to be on the app unless you go right back to the home screen so you never have to scroll around looking for a back button.

I don't understand a thing you are writing. Anybody help with all this grammar?

satus said,

I don't understand a thing you are writing. Anybody help with all this grammar?

It really is quite easy to do things on WP7. Usually, the only thing that requires a lot of focus is typing, unless you're very good at it.
What do I think about this "20%" claim? Well it seems to be true in some cases: It's quite easy to delete applications, or after rating them to go back to the previous screen, or launch a search, etc. The physical buttons do help a lot. On the iPhone, the back button had to be a part of the app's UI, otherwise your only option is to exit the app completely and return to the home screen. On WP7 you don't need to examine the app for a back button... it's right there on the hardware.

Therefore, I believe this "20% less time to complete tasks" claim may have some merit.

burnblue said,

It really is quite easy to do things on WP7. Usually, the only thing that requires a lot of focus is typing, unless you're very good at it.
What do I think about this "20%" claim? Well it seems to be true in some cases: It's quite easy to delete applications, or after rating them to go back to the previous screen, or launch a search, etc. The physical buttons do help a lot. On the iPhone, the back button had to be a part of the app's UI, otherwise your only option is to exit the app completely and return to the home screen. On WP7 you don't need to examine the app for a back button... it's right there on the hardware.

Therefore, I believe this "20% less time to complete tasks" claim may have some merit.

And you got this all from those sentences? Congrats!!

burnblue said,

It really is quite easy to do things on WP7. Usually, the only thing that requires a lot of focus is typing, unless you're very good at it.
What do I think about this "20%" claim? Well it seems to be true in some cases: It's quite easy to delete applications, or after rating them to go back to the previous screen, or launch a search, etc. The physical buttons do help a lot. On the iPhone, the back button had to be a part of the app's UI, otherwise your only option is to exit the app completely and return to the home screen. On WP7 you don't need to examine the app for a back button... it's right there on the hardware.

Therefore, I believe this "20% less time to complete tasks" claim may have some merit.